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Full text of "City-county record"

HI8T0RY PER/ODICALS 



SAN FRANCISCO HISTORY CEMrtR -^ 



□□ 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REFERENCE 
BOOK 

Nol to hr htkcii from lite Libniry 



*"*^'^PER,0D/QAL8 



^ 



THE CITY'S ANSWER TO GROWING THIRST 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




HETCH HETCHY'S HARRY E. LLOYD AND ORAL L MOORE 
The young engineer succeeds the veteran Lloyd as boss March 1st 




Stanford University Holds 
Rapid Transit 'Mandatory' 

CTANFORD UNIVERSITY has joined the University of California in 
calling regional rapid transit a "must" for the Bay Aea. 
In a letter to BARTD. Dr. F. E. Terman, univereity provost, said 
Stanford believes rapid transit "is mandatory in order that the Bay 
Metropolis continue to function as a very special area in which to live 
and to work." 

He said that the system — offer- 
ing high-speed linkage to other 
points on the Peninsula, and to 
San Francisco, the East Bay and 
Marin County"-- would sei-ve as a 
great stimulus to Stanford. He 
mentioned "other uses" of the Uni- 
versity's land which point up the 
need for rapid ti'ansit: the medical 
center, industrial park, shopping 
center, professional area, and V. A. 
hospital. 

Several months ago, Glenn T. 
Seaborg, U.C. Chancellor, said that 
rapid transit would provide "mu- 
tual accessibility" between the imi- 
versity and community. He said it 
would help solve the travel and 
parking problems of a U.C. popu- 
lation soon to reach 40,000 persons. 

The fuU te.xt of the Stanford statement: 

"Stanford University joins with its neighbors, as well as countless 
other institutions — public and private, in advocating a workable rapid 
transit system to connect the many centers of population around San 
Francisco Bay. 

"The University realizes full well what it derives from its position 
in this world-renowned metropolis; it hopes and believes that as a cen- 
ter of culture and leai-ning, it also makes important contributions to 
the area. 

"Many of the benefits of living in his region call for a system of 
rapid transit to supplement our existing and proposed network of traf- 
flcways. As the populations of the Bay Counties soar, this need is un- 
derscored daily. 

"Stanford University would welcome high-speed linkage to other 
points on the Peninsula, and to San Francisco, the East Bay and Marin 
County." 

"We at Stanford feel today that a sound regional rapid transit sys- 
tem can serve as a great stimulus to the future of oui- institution of 
learning and that such a system is mandatory in order that the Bay 
Metropolis continue to function as a vei-y special area in which to live 
and work." 



U.C. Chancellor 
GLENN SEABORG 



CINCOTTA BROTHERS 

Distributors 
MARINE HARDWARE - FISHERIES SUPPLIES 

169 JEFFERSON STREET 
San Francisco 11, Calif. 

PR 5-8977 
liranch — Monterey, Calif. 



DIRECT JETS f'^om San Francisco 

From SAI\ FRANCISCO 

To PARIS and FRANKFURT 
Fastest Service SAN FRANCISCO - ITALY 

LUFTHANSA GERMAN AIRLINES 

364 POST STREET EX. 7-6969 

CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT 



THEODORE V. TRONOFF 

Civil Engineer & Surveyor 

Subdivision - Tracts - Lots - Boundaries 6? Contours 

Two Offices to serve you 

1617 University Avenue — T,H 3-4242 

BERKELEY 

345 Park Plaza Drive — PL 5-7144 

DALY CITY 



Coates, Herfurth & England 

Consulting Actuaries 

Crocker Building, San Francisco 4 
Offices in San Francisco - Denver - Pasadena 

California Water & TeJeplione Co. 

300 MONTGOMERY STREET 
GA. 1-4826 San Francisco 



Pacific Fire Extinguisiier Company 

Established 1894 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 
Executive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, Calif. 

ELIZABETH MANOR 

Home for the Aged 

ORA E. FERGUSON, Administrator 

514 - 12th AVENUE BAyvieu 1-0270 

San Francisco 18, Calif. 



THE RECX>R| 



PUBLIC U^h^. 
-^^'^- 196) 47w3,.63<( 



bay wind 





'AKE FOR US ? Being inordinately fond of all you ( OUR readers are 
' the most literate, cantankerous, lovable, carping, and so on until 
(U must realize that we really KNOW as well as LIKE you I, we want 

share a family event with you. It's this: The City-County Record is 
1 years old this month, isn't showing a strand of gray hair, thank you. 
anks to constant application of printing ink, perhaps should cut down 
1 the calorie intake just a wee 
t, invites you all most cordially, 
st the same, to have a big slice 

hypothetical birthday cake . . . 

WORLD'S GREATEST . . . Don 
lenvood, "the world's gi'eatest 
sc jockey" (a "disc jockey " is a 
inner of platters & tales), an- 
lunces that within a couple of 
lai-s "I'm going to step down 
om my pedestal — rather than 
I pished off." . . . Did you know 
at Dick Rinehart is back in 
wn. writing a novel ? He's the 
finer Chronicle City Hall report- 
who's spent the last couple of 
ATS in the Near East (Turkey! 
1 a Ford Foundation grant. 
Dvel's about Turkey . . . George 
lodes, the News-Call's aviation 
porter, is about to practice what 
I writes: In Augaist he'll conduct 
1 airborne tour to Eiuope : 
FOOTNOTE ON LLOYD: In his 




worked out his Sheraton-Palace She's lively-eyed, cute, chubby, 
problems by then — so that the but when we wandered in to pay 
Lloyd gala will not be dampened respects she was playing with an 
enormous doll and eating a banana. 
This occupied both hands, and 
somewhat outraged, we told her 
daddy: "Tell her to get rid of that 
doll and get to work!" But she 
smiles and said, "I'd rather play 
doll." And her daddy — obviously 
no disciplinarian he — let her. 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Hetch Hetchy Chief 
HARRY LLOYD 



propose to fill, but quickly, as fol- 
lows and to-wit: 

Harry E. (for Edison) Lloyd was 
ory on the big $115,000,00 water born in New Mexico (in White 
mds (see Page 4), Bill Simons oaks, on February 3, 1896), is a 
IS a few notes on Harry E. Lloyd. World War I veteran ( in as a Pri- 
tio retires as Chief of the Hetch vate, out as 2nd Lieutenant, Field 
etchy Tiibe March 1. But not Artilleiy), University of California 
any personal notes were used, giaduate (B.S. in Mining, 1921), 
hich is a reportorial lacuna we married a very charming lady ( the 
fonner Janice Chui'ch) . . . 

February 27 will be a gala Mon- 
day night at the Sheraton-Palace 
when throngs of Lloyd's friends 
will gather in the Gold Ballroom to 
tender a giant testimonial — to a 
giant of a man, come to think of 
it, both from the point of view of 
physical as well as performance 
stature; Harry's a hulking 6-foot, 
2-incher. His successor, 39-year-old 
Oral Moore, is one inch taller. 

Sodden thought (as the repeti- 
tious daily columnists unimagin- 
atively enjoy titling items like 
this) : Hope Chef Finance will have 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

The Magazine of Good Govcrnmettl 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Ed.tur and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14. California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.UU Per Year 

JAN. -FEB., 1961 

VOLUME 28 NUMBER 9 



MELVIN CRONIN 
Judge Superior C^urt 

by cool service from a frictionized 
kitchen! 

WELL EARNED: It couldn't 
have happened to a more deserv- 
ing, more unselfish man. Juvenile 
Court Judge Mel Cronin being 
named Big Brother of 1960. But 
these awards he's been receiving 
have been piling up at a confusing 
rate, so much so that for the rec- 
ord we intend to list them: San 
Francisco Moose Lodge "Man of 
the Year" award, St. Thomas More 
award of USF, Colimibus Civic 
Club's, "Columbus" award of life 
membership in California Congress 
of Parents and Teachers. Enough? 

DOLLS & OILS: One of the 
cuter stories of the month has been 
run in the dailies about 5-year-old 
Theresa Keller who paints abstract 
after abstract which her father 
sells in his Zieniewicz Art Gallerj-. 
2335 Market Street. He's sold some 
30 of her oils, water colors and 
crayon drawings to date for nearly 
$400.00, all of which goes into a 
bank account to defray college ex- 
penses years hence. 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Even most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex' 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit: fares are surprisingly 



U'Drives, 

Limousines, 

Charier Buses 

arailable 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



kNUARY-FEBRUARY, 1961 



THE BIG THIRST 

The Qty's Answer to Growing Thirst : 
A $115,000,000 Water Bond Proposal 

BY BILL SIMONS 
IJESPONDING NOW to the fast-approa-liiiiK requiremt'nts of tlip 
future, tlie Publie Utilities Comnijssion has announced plans for :i 
SI l.">,(M)0,(Mt() bond issue to expand the city's water system. 

BijiK'est in San Francisco's history, the bond issue — which tiic 
Coniinission hopes to have before the voters on the November ballot- 
would nearly double the capacity 

of the famed system that stalls Near-magical? Well, comide, 
in the High Sierra, 167 miles from this: In completely successful c'e- 
the city. This capacity increase fiance of the national inflationary- 
would guarantee the future needs trend, rates for the smallest bio 1: 
of San Francisco and would con- of water sold are 10 per cent les.-: 
tinue to meet the ever-increasing today than in 1930 when San Fian- 
thirst of the booming population in cisco acquired its own water sys- 
the suburban market down the tem. 

Peninsula and around the South ^^.^ ^^^^ ^^ municipal economy 
^•^ ' has been made possible by the 

And the mammoth construction vision and courage of generationj 
program of dams, tunnels and of gan Franciscans. The first plan- 
pipelines will be accomplished ning goes back to the turn of the 
without affecting the city's tax century. And the funds to trans- 
''^'•^- late the dieams of those early 

The Commission points out that planners into what is today one of 
the bonds would be repaid over a the world's great water system?, 
20-year period by the sale of water were provided through approval of 
and Hetch Hetchy power, the re- many major bond issues over the 
payment being already undei-wiit- years. 

ten by long-term contracts with The system is actually composed 
suburban wholesale water custom- of two sister utilities: the Hetch 
ers. In addition — such ai'e the Hetchy Water and Power Supply 
near-magical results of sound utili- Project which catches the njnoff 
ties administration — it is entirely from the melting snow in the Tu- 
possible that a series of rate re- olumne River watershed and regu- 
ductions will be accomplished dur- lates its flow via gravity through 
ing the bond-repayment period. {Continued on Page 15) 



PITTSBURGH TESTING 
LABORATORY 

Established 1 88 1 
INSPECTING ENGINEERS AND CHEMISTS 

651 HOWARD STREET 

San Francisco 5, California 



Cecil's Transmission Service 

Overhauled — Exchanged — Repaired — Aulomotire Service 

Cecil H. Doss 

No. 4 Joost Avenue — JU 6-7979 — San Francisco, Calif. 




-% 



drops 2400 feet down the great penstock to 
electric energy at new Cherry Power House : 



piolu.ibif hydn 



the High Sit 



E. MARTINONI CO. 



"Eestablished 1874" 



WHOLESALERS dc RECTIFIERS OF 
DISTILLED SPIRITS 



70 BERRY STREET 



EX. 7-2760 



San Francisco, Cahf. 



GEORGE L. BURGER 

Wholesale Dealers Potatoes and Onions 



52 VALLEJO ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 11 



EXbrook 2-1313 



THE RECORl! 



DATELINE: ANYWHERE 

Bj KEVIN KEATING 



newspaper men from the U. S. 
thought there was a price of $10.- 
000 on Villa's head, violated the 
grave and ran for the border with 

i" THE WORLD IS anyone's oyster, it's Stanton Dclaplane's. their prize in a hatbox. They were 

The foot-loose columnist for The San Francisco Chronicle has the almost caught by sympathizers 

viable assignment of traveling anywhere and writing anything. As near the border and they sold the 

ig as it makes several million readers laugh. head to a farmer who buried it on 

Delaplane has no trouble getting such results. His soft sell humor his farm. I know a man who claims 

>m ai-ound the world brightens the day for newspaper readers across to have seen it buried. 

; nation. 

Delaplane's success seems to be 

iged on his unique talent to look 

vond the obvious and come up 

th the unusual. Like the time he 

mt looking for Pancho Villa'.s 

ltd. 

[t happened a short time back. 

vild and wacky expedition which 

vas fortunate enough to witne3s. 

rhe action began in Mexico City 

the offices of a dapper Colonel 
the Spanish Colonial building. 

m, wearing the expression of 

1 cat that ate the canary, strod; 
to the Colonel's desk and said: 

"Hola! Is this the seat of Los 

irados de Villa, the Golden Ones. 

3 immortal bodyguards of Gen- 
ii Francisco Villa, deceased?" 

The Colonel wore a khaki uni- 

•m with many ribbons across the 

east; he wore no tie because the 

y was warm. Behind him was a 

■ge photogiaph of Pancho Villa 

the good old days. 

"Si senor," the Colonel replied. 

u servidor. What can I do for 



"I am Stanton Delaplane, col- 
inist for Norte America news- 
pers," said Stan. "I have news 
the l-.ead of Pancho Villa." The 
ilonel jumped from his chair, 
her Doradocs dashed into the 
tie room. 

"Madre de Dios," mustered the 
ilonel. "It cannot be. The North 
nericans cut off the head of the 

irered General many years ago. I Delaplane," said Borzani, with only 
ve heard it is in the Smithsonian a trace of a Hungarian accent. 




Cleopatra used to drink perals in Arrack, a date wine, and Stan Delaplane, 
the Pulitzer prize winning globe-combing columnist, tries her recipe in Cairo 



stitution, guarded heavily by the 
Uted States gove:-nment. 



"My chief interest," Delaplane 
continued, "is in the nine remain- 
I bring him special seasoning ing widows of the great General, 
from Japan." said Delaplane. "He To discover the head of their hus- 
band would bring them great joy. 



looked closely at Stan Deleplane. 
No one who knew Stan when he 
was Captain of the Monterey 
(Californa) lightweight football 
team (he invented Old No. 47, an 
extremely tricky play) ever 
dreamed he would turn out to be a 
Pulitzer prize winner and world 
traveler. Today, he is writing a 
coluinn, "Postcards from Dela- 
plane," which carries datelines 
from Tokyo to Athens, and which, 
some pretty good judges say, is 
the most oinginal humor in Amer- 
ica today. 

Home base for Delaplane is The 
Chronicle, but his column nms in 
dozens of other U. S. newspapers 
through syndication. He is re- 
sponsible for five "Postcards" each 
week, plus an additional column on 
Sundays ("Around the World with 
Delaplane") which answers read- 
ers' travel questions. 

Some stay-at-homes think Dela- 
plane has the best job in the world. 
All he has to do is travel where- 
ever he wants to, staying at the 
best hotels and resorts, from time 
to time taking" a cut at the beluga 
caviar at the Baur-au-lac in Zurich 
or knocking over an order of Cane- 
loni at Passetto's in Rome. Not to 
mention dining on thousand-year- 
old eggs in Hong Kong or belting 
Irish Coffee (which he introduced 
into the United States I at Shannon 
Airport. He has been invited to 
fight a bull in Seville, offered half 
ownership of a bathhouse in the 
Ginza. and asked to smuggle gold 
out of Manila. He declined all of- 
fers. "After all," he says, "I can't 
do all that and write a column 
too." 

The stay-at-homes are wrong. 
This much and more I learned 
about Delaplane when I decided to 
find out for myself just how glam- 
orous a travel writer's life can be. 
(Continued on Page 12) 



"Not so." said Delaplane. unbut- j^ ^^^y ^i„^ ^^ me 
ling his trench coat slowly. "I "ping •• j gaid "But what about It would cement relations between 
.ve here a map. The head of the pgncho Villa's head? Do you really t-^e two great Republics and may- 
spected leader, Pancho Villa, lies j^^q^ where it is''" ^^ ^^^" S'^*^ '"^ something to 

your country, near Hildalgo del ..wuhin a hundred yards," said write about." 

irral. I propose an expedition of ^^^^ ..^^^ ^,^^ ^^1^. ^^^,.^1,. Two As we were being served, I 
IS Dorados. To them must go the 
nor of retrieving the topmost 
rt of the departed leader. " 
"If we are successful, you shall 
come an officer of Los Dorados," 
outed the Colonel. "You shall be 
cond only to me!" 
And with that introduction. 
;laplane was hot on the trail of 
new advontu'e. He and I left the 
Ilonel and taxied to the Rivoli, 
exico's best restaurant. Dario 
jrzani, the owner, bowed us to a 
lOice table. "Es su casa, Senor 



Basketball 


- Baseball - Football - Golf - Softball - T 


rack - Tennis 


Bowli 


ig- 


Uniforms ■ Trc 


>phics Si Rentals - Sk 


Rentals 


Flyin 


^ 


Goose 

"GOOSE 


Sporting 

• GOSLAND 


Goods 






1404 Taraval Street 




MO 1-1909 






San Francisco 16 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 



kNUARY-FEBRUARY, 1961 



HENRY R. ROLPH IS NEW PRESIDENT 
OF THE S. F. MARINE EXCHANGE 

HENRY K. ROLPH, San Francisco Snix-rvisor, admiralty attorney 
and partner In the law firm of (iraliatii, James & Kolpli, lias been 
eUytwl president of the Marine Exchanee of the San Francisco Bay 
region. 

Also selected to lejul the 111-year old maritime service and develop- 
ment organization in the cominj; year were ('apt. John D. Knox 
of Weyerhaeuser Steamship Com- 
pany, 1st vice president; Winston 
J. Jones, States Steamship Com- 
pany. 2nd vice president: Henry 
E. Cabaud. Jr., Johnson and Hig- 
gins of California, 3rd vice presi- 
dent, and V. K. Atkins, Doran Co. 
of California, treasurer, 

Rolph succeeds John R. Wagner, 
executive vice president of Pacific 
Far East Line, Inc., and 1960 Ex- 
change president. 

Newly-elected directors are Carl 
C. Bland, director and senior vice 
president, Balfour-Guthrie & Co., 
Ltd.; Capt. John P. Chiles, assist- 
ant to the vice president, oper- 
ations, American President Lines; 
George F. Hansen, vice president 
and secretai'y, Matson Navigation 
Company, Rear Adm. G. M. Rich- 
ardson, USN (Ret. I district man- 
ager, Raytheon Company and 
Capt. Henry W. Simonsen, presi- 
dent, Industrial Tank. Inc., Mar- 
tinez, and president of the Board 




HENRY R. ROLPH 
Supervisor 

of State Pilot Commissioners. 

Rolph, who has served as an Ex- 
change director since 1958 and as 
1st vice president during the cur- 
rent year, also headed the Bay Re- 
gion Marine Affairs Conference for 



the past three years in a program 
to improve navigational facilities 
throughout the twelve-c o u n t y 
area. 

A native San Franciscan, he was 
elected to the San Francisco Board 
of Supei'visors in Januai-y, 1956 
and serves as chairman of that 
body's Educat on. Parks and Rec- 
reation Committee. Rolph is a 
graduate of Lowell High School, 
San Francisco, and Stanford Uni- 
versity and Stanford Law School. 
He enlisted in the Marine Corps 
and saw active duty in World War 
II in the Pacific Area and now 
holds the rank of Colonel in the 
Resei-ve. 

In accepting his new assignment, 
Ro'ph noted the increasing 
changes taking place in the mari- 
time industry, and in the Bay Re- 
gion. "This is progress, but the 
kind calling for inititative and 
leadership. The Exchange has tra- 
ditionally been the focal point for 
new ideas and programs, with re- 
cent examples including the now 
world-wide effort to cut ship 'red 
tape,' improve harbor navigational 
aids and safety, facilitate locally 
the use of ocean-going cargo con- 
tainers and many others." 

"It is this spirit of willingness to 
evaluate critically present ways of 
doing things and be ready for the 
many demands posed by our grow- 



ing maritime commerce that i 
hope wll continue to characteriz 

the Marine Exchange's program, 
he said. 




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Care Everywhere — 

"WHERE TO BUY THEM" 

MANUFACTURER 

PICO BATTERY MFG. 
CO. 

Johnny Giusti — Owner 
1500 Army Mission 8-1013 

DISTRIBUTOR 

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MArket 1-6696 



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The Bay Area's Largest Fixed Base Operation 

For Flight Information Call JUno 3-8300 or contact your TRAVEL AGENT for Fares and Reservations 



THE RECORi 



tstmaster Fixa Honored by P.O. Department 

)n January 18, 1961, in Wash- National Association of Postmas- 
ton. D. C, in the office of the ters of the United States in pro- 
itmaster General, San Fran- inoting the Department's program 
;o's Postmaster John F. Fixa of improving operating efficiency 
3 honored by the Post Office De- while reducing costs " 
tment when Postmaster Gen- 
1 Arthur E. Summei-field pro- 
ted him with the coveted Meri- 
ious Service Citation, 
"he citation i-ead: "For leador- 
p and management assistance as 
itmaster of the San Francisco 
It Office and as President of the 



DIXIE CLEANERS 

ALTERATIONS AND 

LAUNDRY SERVICE 

Blankets - Drapes - Spreads 
Comforters 

Also "One-Day Special" 

WILLIE B. ERVIN, Prop. 

1698 TURK STREET 

V E 1- 9819 S,in Francisco 

Scavengers' Protective 
Association, Inc. 

Contractors for the Removal of 

Sarhagc, Rubbish 6? Waste Paper 

also Basement Cleaning 

2550 MASON STREET 

Xbrook 2-3859 San Francisco 

Frank Portnian, Jr. 

General Building Contractor 
Alterations and Repairs 

190 Mission St. San Francisco 
J 4-4414 LO 4-2623 




JOHN F. FIXA 

In presenting this award. Post- 
master General Summerfield stat- 
ed: "I am pleased to grant a Meri- 
torious Service Award in recogni- 
tion of the outstanding leadership 
and management assistance pro- 
vided by you to my staff during the 
past eight years. I hope you will 
accept this award as a token of my 
personal appreciation for a job well 
done." 

John F. Fi.\ has been Postmaster 
of San Francisco since August 1, 
1948. 

He served as President of the 
National Association of Postmas- 
ters of the United States for two 
terms, in 1955 and 1956 and at 
present is a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of that group. 



WILSON MEYER NAMED 
TO S.F. WAR MEMORIAL 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Wil.son Meyer, chairman of the 
board of Wilson & Geo. Meyei- .>; 
Co., was appointed by May i 
George Chiistopher on January 1 
to a six-year term on the board or 
tru.stees of the War Memorial of 
oan Francisco. 

The trustees administer the 
city's multi-million dollar War Me- 
morial, where the United Nations 
UM ; born in 1945. The Memorial 
comprises the nation's first mimici- 
pally owned Opera House, seating 
3,285 persons, and the nearby Vet- 
erans' Building, which houses of- 
fices of more than 100 veterans' or- 
ganizations. 

Meyer, member of a pioneer San 

KARESH TAKES THE 
OATH AS JUDGE 

Joseph Karesh officially became 
San Francisco's newest Superior 
Judge after taking the oath of of- 
fice in the home of his law school 
classmate. Judge John B. Molinari. 

Karesh's tenii began January 1, 
and thus he had to be sworn in 
even though the day was a legal 
holiday. 

So he asked Judge Molinari to 
administer the oath in his home at 
1262 Lombard St. The two judges 
were graduated in 1933 from the 
University of San Francisco Law 
School. 



Francisco family and long a promi- 
nent figure in the local business 
community, is a graduate of the 
University of California and a vet- 
eran of World War I. He is also a 
trustee of the California Academy 
of Scifncp.s and of the Society of 




WILSON MEYER 

California Pioneers. He recently 
was decorated by King Oliv V of 
Norway with the Knight's Cross, 
First Clas, of the Royal Order of 
St. Olav of Norway. 

The 111-year old company of 
which he is board chairman en- 
gages in the distiibution of indus- 
trial and agricultural chemicals 
and plastics in the Western States, 
with headquarters in San Fran- 
cisco and district offices in Los An- 
geles, Portland, Seattle and Salt 
Lake City. 



EX 


7-5138 


TW 


x-888 




FRANK J. 


MOHR 




INVESTMENT SECURITIES 


- STOCKS - BONDS 




r'ftsjf 








454 COLUMBUS 


AVENUE 






San Francisco 





GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



NONA REALTY 

Nona Harwick - Realtor 

533 BALBOA STREET 

Bus. BA. 1-5576 Res. BA. 1-3504 



THOS. THOMASSER & ASSOCIATES 

Caterers 

1228 - 20th AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



<njARY-FEBRUARY, 1961 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



HE 1-2121 



MAYOR 

■J(K1 City Hall MA 1 

"It'orpe Christopher. Mayor 

Joaoph J. Allen, Executive Secretary 
Mark Jj. ("lerstle III, Cont^dential Secretary 
Mareraret Smith. Personal Secretary 
.loliii 1>. Mootz, Administrative Assistant 
■liihn 1>, Sullivan. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

2.15 City Hall 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Dr. Charlea A. Ertola. President. 

25.1 Columbus Ave. 
William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 
.loseph M. Casey. 252,'! Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Dobbs. S51 California St. 
John .1. Ferdon. 155 Montgomery St. 
•lames U Halley. H70 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 
Henry R. Kolph. 310 Sansome St. 
James J. Sullivan, 31 West Portal 
J. Joseph Sullivan. Ill Sutter St. 
Alfonso J. Zirpoli, 300 MontRnmery St. 

Ttobert J. Dolan. Clerk 

Lillian M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — James J 

Sullivan. Blake. McMahon 
Count.v. State and National Affairs — Ferdon, Casey, 

Halley 
Education. Parks and Recreation — Rolph, Blake, J 

Joseph Sullivan 
Finance, Revenue and Taxation — Halley, Ferdon 

Zirpoli 
Judiciary, Legislative and Civil Service — Dobbs 

Casey, Rolph 
Police — Casey, Dobbs, James J. Sullivan 
Public Buildings, Lands and City Planning — J 

Joseph Sullivan. Dobbs, James J. Sullivan 
Public Health & Welfare — Zirpoli. Halley, McMahon 
Public Utilities — McMahon, Ferdon, Zirpoli 
Streets and Highways — Blake, Rolph, ,1. J 



ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall 
Uus.s.ll L. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

L'lifi <-ity Hall 
Dinii R. Holm 



'I'lir 



Lyi 



PUBLIC DEFENDER 

7(iii .Mnnteomerv S 
Kdward T. Mancuso 
SHERIFF 

331 City Hall 
Matthew C. Carberry 
TREASURER 

nil City Hall 
Jiihii J. GooJuin 



EX 7-0500 
EX 2-1535 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor, City Hall U.X 1-855. 

H. A. VanDerZee, presiding Gerald S. Levin 

Raymond J. Arata I'rancis McCailv 

Carl H. Allen John B. Moliiiari 

Byron Arnold Edward .Molkenbuhr 

Walter Carpeneti Clarence W. .Morris 

C. Harold Cauifleld Harry J. Neubarth 

Melvyn I. Cronin Edward F. ODay 

Preston Devine (*harles S. Peery 

Norman Elklngton Oeorge W. Schonfeld 

Timothy I. Fitzpatrlck William F. Traverso 

Joseph Karesh Alvin E. Weinberger 

Joseph M. Cummin!!, Secretary 

480 City Hall UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall KL 2-3008 

John W. Hussey. presiding Clarence Linn 

Albert A. Axelrod William O'Brien 

Robert J. Drewes Raymond O'Connor 

Andrew J. Kynian Lenore D. Underwood 

Clayton W. Horn James J. Welsh 

Leland J. Lazarus George E. Maloney 



Ivan L. Slavich, Secretary 

301 City Hall 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Co 



Kl, 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

lilt City Hall KL 2-300S 

.lames M. Cannon, Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-.S552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
Daniel J. Collins. Foreman 
Sydney W. Hopkins. Secretary 
Ralph A. Shcehan, Consulting Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St. YU fi-2950 

John D. Kavanaugh, Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 340 Fremont St. 
William Moskowitz. 1901 California Street 
Robert A. Peabody, 399 Fremont 
Adolph L. Pierotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Prank Ratto, 526 California St. 
Kendrick Vaughan, 60 Sansome SI. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SB 1-5740 



JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 445 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch. 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger. 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
Rev. James B. Flynn, 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Boswell, 1975 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duekel 

Joseph Mignola. Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 
Maurice Shean, 

940 - 25th St. N.W.. Washington. D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
El Mirador Hotel. Sacramento, during Si 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 I-ivrkin HE 1- 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley. M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Nell Sinton, 1020 Francisco St. 

.lohn K. Hagopian, Mills Tower 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson, 2836 Vallejo St, 

William B. Knuth, S. F. State College 

Jos.'ph Esherick, 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell. 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
I^resldent, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library l':ommission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 I^u-kiri St. HE 1-2 

Meets every Thursday 2;30 P.M. 

Joseph B. Tinney, President. 2517 Mis.sion St. I 
Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. 
James S. Kearney. 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Mein. 315 Montgomery St. 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter. 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 

Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 
Thomas G. Miller, .Secretary 1 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 1 

151 City Hall HE 1-2 

Meets every Thur.sdav at 4 P.M. 

Wm. Kilpatrick. President. 827 Hyde St. . 

Richard C. Ham. 200 Bush St. ' i 

Hubert J. Sober. 155 Montgomerj- St. I 

George J. Orubb. Gen. Mgr. of Personnel ] 

DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. HE 1-2 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.). Director 
Alex X. McCausland, Public Information GITicel 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN S-< 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M„ 
170 Fell St. 

Mrs. Claire Matzger. President. 3550 Jackson St. 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper, Jr., 10 Walnut St. 
Adolfo de Urioste. 512 Van Ness Ave. 
Edward Kemmitt. 601 Polk St. 
Samuel Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 
Joseph A. Moore, Jr., 351 California St. 
Elmer F. Skinner, 220 Fell St. 
Dr. Harold Spears 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 1- 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 
Bert Simon, President, 1350 Folsom St. 
Dr. Peter Angel, 1867 - 15th Ave. 
Philip Dindia, 536 Bryant St. 

William F. Murray, Chief of Department 

Albert E. Hayes. Chief, Division of Fire 
Prevention & Investigation 

Thomas TV. McCarthy, Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

61 Grove St. HE 1-1 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook, President, 220 Montgomei 
George W. Cunitfe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell. M.D., 977 Valencia St. 
Frank J. Collins. 2614 - 16th Ave. 

Thomas W. McGrath 

Ruben E. Hunt, Medical Director 



Ex-Officio Members 

Chairman, Finance Conmiittee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3- 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jefferson A. Beaver. Chairman, 2400 Sutter St. 

Al F. Mailloux. 200 Guerrero St. 

Charles R. Greenstone, 2 Gearv St. 

Charles J. Jung. 622 Washington St. 

Thomas W. McGrath. 2940 - ICth St 

Jacob Shemano, 988 Market St. 

John W. Beard. Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

.536 Golden Gate Ave. PR 6- 

Meets every Thursday. 4 P.M. 
John E. Sullivan. 69 West Portal 
Jay E. Jellick. 564 Market SI. 
<j. Baltzer Peterson. 116 New .Montgomery St. 
David Thomson. 65 Berry St. 

Vining T. Fisher, General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 



THE RECOII 



ERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 
227 City Hall 

M.'.ta fViry Wednesday at 3.Sii P.M 
lent, ;iS.| F„\y 



IIIO l-211'l 



A'llllam H. H. Davis, President, 
I. Max Moore. VU-e-Hies,. fi'is P 
Vllllam H. H. Plivla, 984 Folsom 
•cter Tainaia.s, 1020 Harrison St 
;larence J. Walsh. 2450 - 17th St 
Brnest I.. West. 265 MontKonier; 
J. Bdwln Mattox. Secretary 

>OLICE COMMISSION 



Me 



Mil 



iit 5:011 



St. 



'.M. 



larold R. MiKlniion. President, 255 I'alifo 

>aul A. Blsslnger. P.O. Box 2442 

:honias J. Mellon, 390 First St. 
Thomas CahMI. Chief of Pollee 
Alfred J. Nelder. Deputy IMlief of Polic. 
I. Thomas ZaniKOza, Direetnr of Traffl( 
rapt. Daniel MeKlem. I'hief of Inspect 
lA. Wm. .1. (1-Hrien. rommission Secrel 
rapt. John T. Hutler. IVpartnunt Seer 

>UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 



Meets 1st Tiiesda 
ris 



St. 



I. Lee Vavuris. President. 'J'Mi ileary 
ohn M. Bransten. 665 - 3rd St. 
V. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 
tose M. Kanueehi. 511 rolumbus Ave. 
larearet Cirdner. 1360 Lonihard St. 
ohn 10. Ourleh. 300 Monteomery St. 
lev. William Turner. 1642 Broderick St 
irs. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 
Jllton K. I/epetieh, 1655 Polk Street 
Libert E. Sehwabacher, Jr.. 100 Montgoi 
'homas W. S. Wu. D.D.S., 1111 Stockto 
William R. Holman. Librarian 
Krank A. (.'larvoe. Jr.. Secretary 



'UBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

2S7 City ilai; H 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

)on Fazackerley, President. 851 Howard St 
Ituart N. Greenberg. 765 Kolsom St. 
leorKe F. Hansen. 215 Market St. 
Ienr\- W. Roden. lilHil Broadway 
■homas P. White, 400 Brannan St. 

C. Kirkwood, Manager of Utililie 



Robe 



J. Fil 



Sec- 



Bureaus and Departments 
.ecounts, 2S7 City Hall 1 

Cieorge Negri. Director 
lirport, San Francisco International, S. F 

Belford Brown. Manager 
letch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. 1 

Harry E. Lloyd. Chief Engineer and Ci 
Manager 

lunicipal Railway, !i4!i Presidio Ave. 

\'erniin \V. Anderson. .Manager 
ersonnel 4 Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
'ubiic Service, 287 City Hall ) 

William J. Simons, Director 
Vater Department, 425 Mason St. 

James H. Turner. General Manager 

UBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
5S5 Bush St. 



6-5656 
1-2121 



Me 



at 9 A.M. 



nd 3rd Tuesda: 



ach 



nth 



Irs. John J. Murray. President. 1306 Pnrtola Dri 
richolas A. Loumos. 220 Montgomery St. 
nillam P. Scott. Jr.. 249 Natoma St. 
acquelino Smith. 537 Tenth Avenue 
rank H. Slo.ss, 351 California St. 

Ronald H. Born. Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Eulala .Smith. Secretary 

lECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

Mcl.^ren Lodge. Golden Gate Park SK l-4,s 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 

I'aller A. Haas, Sr.. 98 Battery St.. President 

'eter Bercut. I !.,umbard St. 

lary .Margaret Casey. 532 Mission St. 

niliam M. Coffinan. 525 Market St. 

•r. Francis J. Herz. 430 Sutter St. 

Irs. Joseph A. Moore, 2590 Green St. 

ohn F. Conway. Jr.. 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
Paul N. Moore. Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gale Ave. 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Everett Orlffin, Chairman, 465 California 
James B. Black, .Ir . iJii .Mnntgomery St 



RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 



IIK 1-2121 



Meets every Wednesday at 3 P.M. 
William T. Reed, President, 2151 - ISlh Ave. 
Philip S. Dalton, 1 Sansome St. 
James M. Hamlll 120 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. DIez. 2251 - 35th Ave. 
.Martin F. Wormuth. 4109 Pacheco 

Ex-Officio Members 
Presldiinl. Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce. Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Vetei-ans Building MA 1- 

Mcets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
tgonu- 



lOii;;. 



1349 Nor 



867 Market SI. 
i;, ..iL-i r Havis. Ill Sutter St. 
Siiiii K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson. 19 Maywood Drive 
WiKnn Mever. 333 MontL'omerv St. 
Guiilii J. Mu.sto. 535 North Point 
Samuel D. Sayad. 35 .•\ntos Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern. 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharke.v. Managing Director 

E. Lawrence George. Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veter.TUs Building HK 1- 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg.. Kmbarcaderi 
Raymond L. Bozzini 

• Market, Bayshnre & Ale 



Thos. P. Chr 



Market Maste 



Ml 7-9423 
DO 2-0461 



CORONER 

650 Merchant St. 
Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

n. (1. Town.send. Chief 
Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Plant 

FINANCE <!. RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk & Recorder HE 1-2121 

' Martin Mongan. 317 City Hall 

Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Ci.rni-liu.'* S. .Shea. 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Chiirl.s .\, Ki.RiTs. 167 City Hall 



Tax Collector 

Li.uis Cnnll. Ili7 I'ity Hall 
Records Center 

L. J. LcGuennec, 160 Otis 



HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEmlock 1-2121. Ext. 704 
Lloyd Conrieb. 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea. 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnin. Stockton & O'F.n 
Frank E. Oman. 557 - 4th St. 
Terence J. O'Sullivan. 200 Gu 

Bermrd A. Cummings. Se 



Ha 



PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building I'X 1-1701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. E. C. Sage, Assistant Director of Public Health 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4033 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 7tli ,\ve. & Dewey Blvd. 

lyiiuis A. .Moriiii. Siipcrintindent MO 4-1380 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. 10. Albers. Suiierintendent Ml 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake. Adm. Superintendent HE I-2S0O 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 



City Ha 



Reuben II. Owens. Dinitor 
R. Brooks Larter, 

Assistant Director. Administrative 
L. J. Archer, 

Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 






Accounts, 2611 City Hall 


HE 1 


2121 


.1. .1. .MiClnsk.v. Supervisor 






Architecture. 26.-| city Hull 


1110 1 


2121 


Charles W. Griffith. City Anhit.ct 






Building Inspection, 275 citv Hall 


HE 1 


2121 


Hubert C. Levy, Suiierlnlindent 






Building Repair, 2:'.2:i Artny 


1110 1 


2121 


A, II lOkiribi-rg. Superlnti iid.-nt 






Central Permit Bureau, 2S6 cilv Hall 


HE 1 


2121 


Slilniv Franklin. Supervisor 






Egineering. ■'■:••■' cilv Hall 


HE 1 


2121 


clirfi.ril .1, G.irtz. Cilv Engineer 






Sewer Repair i Sewage Treatment, 232 


1 Army 


St. 


W:illir B. Jones 


HE I 


2121 


Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. 


HE 1 


2121 


I'.irriard .M. Crotty, Superintendent 






Street Repair, 2323 Army St. 


HE 1 


2121 



F. 11. Brown. Superintendent 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 

Bin lienas. Purchaser of Supplies 

T. F. Conwav. Chief Assistant 
Purcha.ser of Supplies 
Central Shops, .sno Quint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, l.'.th and Hai 

J. 10. Learv. Siipirvisor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 5 



orge 



REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 



Philip L Rczo 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 City Hall 1110 1- 

O. C. Skinner. Jr. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Co'.den Gate Park HA 1- 

Dr. Robert C. .Miller. Director 



coin Park 



Meets 2nd iMonday. Jan 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 
.Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. Honorary President 

2 Pine St. 
Walter E. Buck. President. 233 Montgome; 
id Armsby. Ill Sutt' 



BA 1-5610 
. Oct. 



Lou 



A. Benoist, 37 Dri 



St. 



Tobin Clark. San Mate 
Alexander de Bretteville. 2000 Washington I 
Walter S. Johnson. 2,411 Hyde St. 
.Mrs. Hruie ICclham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 
Charles -NLner. San erancisco Examiner 
William W. .Mein, 313 Montgomery St. 
Liavid PKytleii-oouverie, Glen Ellen, Calif. 
John N. Uosckrans. 333 Montgomery St. 
William R. Wallace, Jr., 100 Bush St. 
Whitney Warren, 111 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach, 1 Bush St. 



Ex-Offici< 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & 

Thomas Carr Howe. 

Capt. Myron 10. Thon 



Me 



aber 



etar 



M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park HA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. April. June. ocl.. 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

Mr.s. Helen Cameron. Honorary President. 
Hillsborough 

l;i(h:irr] Ub.i-in. President. 1659 Russ Budg. 

.Mil hel 1 ' Willi. 126 Post 

.Mi.-«s Liiui.se A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

Sbeldiin G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

Cluirlis de Young Thlerlot. 1802 Flouribunda. Hills- 
h irouffh 

K. clwin Follis, 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Helmbucher. 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garret McEnerncv. II, 3725 Washington St. 

Roscoe F. Oakes, 2006 Washington St. 

Joseph O. Tobin, 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker, Burlingame Country Club 

Charles Page, 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Filoli San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

i resident. Recreation & Park Commission 
Dr. Walter Heil, Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Maealplne. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

4:16 City Hall HIO 1-2121 

Robert J. Everson. Librarian 



Charles W. Fl 



chs. Secretary 



MA 1-17 
and Manager 



KNUARY-FEBRUARY. 1961 



Fire Department I nderwater Rescue Team 



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Througlj the efforts of Chief William Murray and with the voluntary action of 
six members, the San Francisco Fire Department now has a well equipped under- 
water rescue team of six men. Chief Murray feels that the Fire Department 
should be ready for every eventuality and with the City surrounded by water, 
the utility of this group will become necessary at any time. 



DIESEL ENGINEERING SERVICE 



COMPLETE DIESEL ENGINE 
REPAIRS AND SERVICE 



1401 Middle Harbor Road 
TEmplebar 2-2118 Oakland 20, Calif. 

Sunshine Corner Rest Home 

FOR THE AGED - AMBULATORY 



"T/ie Best of Food and Care' 



1521 MASONIC AVE. 
Ernestine L. McLoriii 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone UNderhill 3-4470 



Board of Permit Appeals, Cit\i 
And County of San Francisco 

Tf/ILLIAM H. H. DAVIS is the new President of the Board of Permit 
Appeals, City and County of San Francisco. Mr. Davis succeeded 
Ernest L. West in the Board presidency. Mr. Davis, appointed to the 
Board by Mayor George Christopher in 19.57, is President of the Duart 
Manufacturing Company, at 984 Folsom Street. He served as Chairman 
of the 1955 City and County Grand Jury. 

At the Board's annual reorganization meeting Commissioner J*.' 
Max .Moore, prominent business 
and community leader, was named 
Vice President. 

The Board of Permit Appeals is 
an appellate body to which the citi- 
bens can appl.v for hearings in 
cases where denials of city li- 
censes or permits issued by any 
City Department has imposed 
hardship by reason of technicali- 
ties, or outmoded codes with all 
due regard to be given to all safe- 
ty factors. This Board is often 
spoken of as "the poor man's 
court." Also any individual or 
group, feeling that the operations 
allowed under any issued permit 
will adversely affect the public in- 
terest or their own property rights 
and values, may appeal to have 
said permit revoked, if they can 
convince four of the five Board 
members of the justice of their 
cause. The Board of Permit Ap- 
peals provides these appellate serv- 
ices to any citizen without their 
having to resort to expensive and 
time consuming law suits. The 
Board acts as a checkmate on any 
possible exercise or abuse of dis- 
cretion or arbitrary interpretations 
of codes or law on the pait of any 
City Department permit issuing 
head. Its decisions, in turn, may be 
appealed to the courts. In twenty- 
eight years three such cases have 
been resolved in imanimous Cali- 
fornia Supreme Court decisions af- 
firming the Board's actions, ami 
these decisions along with the Cit\' 

Charter and Municipal Code have ERNEST L. WEST 

clearly and fully delineated the Retiring President of Board < 

scope of its authority. Permit Appeals 






Hydromatic Fordomatic Dynaflow Powerfl 


te 




Torqiie-flitc Powerglide Mercomatic 






BARCO 






AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION SERVICE 






All Work Guaranteed 




562 


BRYANT STREET SU 


1-08J9 




EDWARD J. HILL & ASSOCIATES 






Consulting Engineer 




166 


GEARY STREET GArfield 
San Francisco 8, California 


1-3955 



THE RECORI 



lounces Candidacy 
Retirement Board 




WILLIAM T REED 
Chief Land Appraiser 

Room 101 - City Hall 

San Francisco 2. California 

KLondikc 2-1910 

January 3, 1961 
ow City Employees: 
:any of our mutual friends have 
;d me to run for re-election to 
Retirement Board at next Feb- 
■j''s election. 

ive years on the Board is a long 
5. and yet it takes just about 
; long to acquire the experience 

know-how necessaiy to do a 
notch job for our fellow City 
p 1 o y e e s coming before the 
rd. 

have thought long and careful- 
.bout this. You know well that 
ive done everything: within my 
er and ability to give a sympa- 
c hearing to the matters and 
»ns before the Board. That's 
it I went on the Board to do in 

first place. 

fith the knowledge that comes 
n experiensce, I feel I can con- 
le to do the type of job you 
it done for you on the Retire- 
it Board, and to be, as I have 
i always to be, an effective rep- 
ntative of all City employees, 

simply of one Branch, one 
sion. One Department, 
have therefore decided to run 
in in February 1961 and I ask 
r support and help. 
11 I can promise is a square 
1 for every employee coming 
»re the Board; to make myself 
liable any time to hear your 
jlems with the Board; to do 
very best that's in me for the 
'ice and benefit of all my fellow 
r Employees. 

U deeply appreciate your siip- 
;. Sincerely, 

WILLIAM T. REED 
lection: Feb. 1, 1961 - Feb. 15. 
1. 



Marsh & Mclennan - (Osgrovc 
& COMPANY 

•■E.-^tiiblislicd ISVr" 

INSURANCE 

ONE BUSH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 4 

YU 2-1900 

San Francisco - Los Angeles - Seattle - Vancouver, B.C. 
Oakland - Portland - San Diego - Phoenix, Ariz. 

MART BANQUET CLUB 



Retirement Luncheons 8C Dinners 
Fashion Shows - Banquets - Dances 

50 to 1,000 Persons. Privacy ■ Comfort - Parking 

1333 MARKET STREET LJN 1-2820 

PRICE'S CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL 

331 Pennsylvania Street 
MI. 7-3587 San Francisco 

ALPINE REST HOME 

E.xpcrt Care — Ecd. Scmi-Bcd £?■ i^mhulatory 

Sreciiil Diets if Needed — Dclieious Food 

St.tte Liecnscd Nursing Care 24 Hours 

MRS. RUTH BAKER.' OwnerOpcrator 

1152 ALPINE ROAD WALNUT CREEK, CALIF. 

YEllowstone 5-5560 

Compliments of 

DION R. HOLM 

CITY ATTORNEY 
and 

THOMAS M. O'CONNOR 

PUBLIC UTILITIES COUNSEL 

NEW METHOD 

Laundry and Dry Cleaners 

407 SANCHEZ STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 
MArket 1-0545 



Mae's lloiiic for (lie \f,d 

,'\Mlhul,U..,V GucMs 

45} . 4}rd AVENUE 
SK 1-7757 



BOP CITY 

I6W POST STREET 
SAN FRArJC.'SCO 



Toulouse French Laundry 

L;iundry 6C Cleaning 

S21 IINCOLN WAY 

MO 4-1634 



Gary's Auto Service 

Touring - AAA Auto Atsn. Ser.icc 

General Auto Repairs 

3475 CHAMPION ST. 

KE 6-2165 Oakland, Calif. 



North Beach French- 
Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



JUnlper 7-7020 



MACHINE SHOP 



Bill Nutter's Garage 

Specialiits on Wheel Aligninent 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

BILL R.Mitl.A, 

515 VISIT ACION AVE. 

Near Bayshorc Blvd. San Frencisco 2A 



Belfast Beverages 

640 VALENCIA STREET 
San Francisco 



Civic Center Stationery 

Complete Line of Stationery 

46S McAllister street 

Across from the City Hall 
MArket 1-8041 



Victoria Pastry Co., Inc. 

Italian & French Pastries 

and Confections 

Cakei for All Occasions 

1362 STOCKTON STREET 

SU I-20I5 



TAOICH GRILL 

SU. 1-9754 
545 CLAY STREET 



ARV-FEBRUARY. 1961 



Dateline: Anywhere 

(Continued from Page 5) 
Interesting it is; glamorous it is 
not. 

Delaplane "v/rites hard" as he 
puts it. He must turn out 600 
words a day. and those words must 
be funny. He writes enough ma- 
terial to fill three full-length novels 
every year. A lot of thought, con- 
versation and reading about his 
subject is demanded before Dela- 
plane ever sits down at the type- 
writer. 

One of his trade secrets is peo- 
ple. He studies them with a pas- 
sion, and he has an incredible "ear" 
for stylized conversation, which he 
quotes to perfection in his column. 

In his "Post Cards," Stan essays 
the role of a sort of henpecked 
slightly confused "milktoast indi- 
vidual. This personality couldn't be 
further from his own. He is a 
warm, pei'sonable and witty con- 
versationalist whose alert mind 
misses no tiick. He knows his way 
around the world in an intimate 
way that few travelers ever ac- 
complish. As a student of history, 
he is familiar with the country he 
visits long before he sets foot on 
new ground. Prodigious reading 
precedes each trip he makes. 

We were walking along the 
Boulevard of the Insurgents when 



Del pointed to a statue in the mid- 
dle of a square. "Cuauhtemoc," he 
said, "last of the Emperors. Mexi- 
can hero. When Cortez thought 
Cuauhtemoc knew where some 
treasiue was biuied, he poured oil 
over the Indians feet and set a 
good little bonfire. Cuauhtemoc 
never popped about the gold, al- 
though it must have been pretty 
painful business. 

"That is how the hotfoot was 
invented," said Delaplane with a 
know-it-all look. 

"How'd you find this out?" I 
asked. 

"Books," said Delaplane. 

Stan also finds lots of material 
right at home, although his con- 
tract requires that he have a for- 
eign dateline at least six months 
of every year. 

Stan is a very shy man, and his 
happy knack is getting himself in- 
volved in relatively unhappy situ- 
ations, even as you and I. He seems 
to have the oddest transportation 
problems. In Mexico he rode a 
thousand miles in a taxi when his 
car broke down in Tepic. Another 
time he hired a driver to take him 
over the winding mountain roads 
to the seacoast. The young driver 
was happy. "You are wise to em- 
ploy me," he said. "Now I must go 
imediately to make preparations." 
He drove away in Delaplane's car. 



Later that night Stan saw his car 
packed to the gunwales with happy 
Mexicans screaming through the 
streets. The next morning, the long 
trip started. Late. Two hours out 
of the city the driver began to cry. 

"Stop that," Delaplane said. "I 
can't stand seeing a grown man 
cry." "Aiee," sobbed the driver, "I 
am sad to be leaving my home." 
"Leaving home?" Del said. "You'll 
be back home tomorrow." "Ah, but 
senor, I have never been away 
from home befoie, so I am sad. 
Also I am very sick in the head 
and stomach and would like it for 
you to drive." So with his 'hired 
man' sobbing in the rear of the car, 
Stan drove all the way to the 
coast, never turning around to cuss 
the diiver because his attention 
was on the road which had many 
treacherous curves. 

Stan comes by all this suffering 
honestly; he's been a newspaper- 
man a long time. He joined The 
Chronicle about 1935, having ar- 
rived by a roimdabout route from 
Chicago. Almost immediately he 
became the talking dog editor and, 
almost as rapidly, the best report- 
er.-rewrite-feature man in the 
city. When six counties of Oregon 
and California decided to secede 
from their mother states to from a 
new state, Delaplane was at the 
ramparts. He won a Pulitzer Prize 



in 1942 for this coverage, and 
1946 the Headliners Club nam« 
him the outstanding feature writi 
in the nation. "Postcards fro 
Deleplane" won him another Heai 
liners' award in 1959. 

During the war he was Commai 
del Deleplane of the U. S. Maritin 
Service and fought the good figl 
on the banks of the Potomac. I 
was a genuine war conespondei 
in the Pacific foi' the Chronic 
and NANA. His columns have bei 
collected in a book published 1 
Doubleday and another one, titli 
"The Little World of Stanton Del 
plane," was a best seller. 

Oh, you're wondering about Pa 
cho Villa's head? Stan didn't 1 
cate it on the expedition I've bet 
telling you about. But he wi 
Some new clues have turned i 
and Stanton Delaplane is cham 
ing at the bit until his schedu 
will allow him to return to Mexii 
and retrieve the most sought-aft 
head in the Americas. 



C. C. Shadcr — now operating 

Hoffmann Bros. 

Grocery fit Liquors 
3807 -24th St. MI 701 £ 



Arnold's Appliance 
Service 

Installation - Delivery Service 

All Major Home Appliances 

632 Persia St. JU 6-6100 



Bay Super Market 

Liquors - Beer - Wines 

Free Delivery &? ParkinK 

S6?H Green Stamp.s 

2525 Jones St. OR 3-55J 



Dobie's Navigation School 

409 Washington St. Suite 8-9 

San Francisco II, Calif. 

GA 1-8176 



Ed Woodward & Son 

PAINTER 

No Job Too Large or Too Snwll 
241 Leiand Ave. DE 3-7562 



BONDED DRAYAGE 
SERVICE 

1445 ILLINOIS STREET 
MI 8-6060 



J. P. ManettCo. 

BROKER 

Eggs • Butter - Meats 

329 Clay St. GA 1-8933 



THE VILLAGE 

Private Parties 

Weddings - Receptions 

01 Columbus Ave. PR 6-4775 



Kowji's Richfield Service 

SfefH Green Stamps 
2 Stciner St. MA 6-0530 



Mabel Minton 
Guest House 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9253 



Sayed's Cafeteria 

ANNIE McMULLEN 

25 ST ANY AN STREET 

BA 1-6091 



BURKE ROOFING 

Residential • Commercial 

5951 MISSION STREET 

JU 6-1212 



Arneice's Beauty Salon 

Regain and Retain that which is 
Naturally Yours 

2085 SUTTER STREET 

FI 6-4629 



Edgar Meat Products Co. 

EDGAR WONG 

2943 MISSION STREET 

VA 6-6830 



B & D Speedo-Tachograph 

SERVICE 

Service on Speedometers, Tacho' 

meters Sangamo Tachographs 

and Clocks 

690 Van Ness Ave. TU 5-1642 



EARTHQUAKE 
McGOQN'S 

99 BROADWAY 
YU 6-1433 



Hanah Market 

1101 Silver Ave. DE 3-7IS 



PAUL SEMION 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 
1655 Polk St. OR 3-177i 



Ling's Signal Service 

John Ling 
595 Brvant St. SU l-tl'M 



Andy's New Glass 

New S Used Table Tops 
5234 - 3rd St. VA 6-0840 



HOTEL REO 

422 Valencia St. t^A I-?I6; 



Chicago Barber Shop 
No. I 

2004 Sutter St. JO 7-W3 



HOTEL BOYD 

Transient - V/eekly Rates 
41 Jones St. MA I-IQ4I 

Westward Dental 
Products Co. 

1037 Polk St. SR 4.717. 



INDAY CAFE 



557 Kearny St. 




c James Lick Monument BEFORE Crane Pest Controllers applied Scarecrow, 
lacquer — like substance which chased the pigeons away to happier hunting 
unds. The new substance keeps the birds from roosting and, in so doing, 
ps the Mayor of San Francisco happy. 



The James Lick Monument in San Francisco's Civic Center AFTER Crane ap- 
plied Scarecrow. No more pigeons — no more dirt — plenty more money for City 



lome four months after San 
incisco city officials agreed to 
use of the famed James Lick 
nument in Civic Center as a 
sting ground" for a new type of 
eon repellant which would aid 
yor George Christopher in his 
tinuing battle against these 
Jthei- merchants." The city ap- 
rs to be winning . . . and by a 
tout at that. 

LCcording to Eric Livingston, 
sident of Crane Pest Control, 
ich applied the lacquer-like sub- 
nce. nary a pigeon has set foot 
the monument and Mr. James 



Lick is almost as clean as the day 
he was sculpted. This is incredible, 
added Cran'e President, in view of 
the fact that literally thousands of 
pigeons had made Mr. Lick's . . . 
and the Mayor's . . . life miserable 
for years. 

The experiment started when 
Livingston, who has nothing 
againss pigeons personally, discov- 
ered that the city was spending 
a p p ro X i m a t e 1 y $1,000 I ONE 
THOUSAND ) a year for each civic 
monument cleaned! Since San 
Francisco has many monuments. . . 
and since the city has many more 



pigeons . . . and since Mr. Living- 
ston is a civic-minded citizen, he 
decided something should be done 
immediately. 

The "something" was Scarecrow, 
which had already kept the pig- 
eons away from Trafalgar Square 
in London for some than two 
years. Whereupon Crane offered to 
varnish at least one monument free 
of charge as a key test; an offer 
which both the Department of 
Public Works and the Park and 



Recreation Department accepted 
with alacrity. 

And, at this writng Crane's ef- 
forts, in cooperation with the city 
fathers, to "keep this city clean" 
seems to be paying off. The final 
decision will be made, however, 
when a year's time elapses. But if 
the piegons keep losing this 
"battle," it would appear that San 
Francisco . . . and other cities, as 
well . . . may well save themselves 
hundreds of thousands of dollars. 



ROBERTA'S 

Drcssmakinj; - Alterations 

2477 SACRAMENTO ST. 

FI 6-4616 



Chris says "GREETINGS 
And drop into the 

RED ROBIN 

16 Eddy St. TU 5-3413 



In this corner! 



Ray's Corner Liquor! 

Beer • Wines Liqin.rs 

Imported (s' Domestic 

506 Valencia St. UN 3-6334 

Jeanellf's Beauty Salon 

Complete Beauty Service 
2701 JUDAH STREET 

MO 4.iii,iy 



Ocean View Variety 
Store 

Geo. E. Hcndcl Virginia Perry 

133 Broad St. JU 4-8101 

Jimmy Wong — now operating 

Union Service Station 

Complete Automotive Service 
2698 California St. WE 1-9773 

Roland H. Osterberg 

DIAMOND SETTER 

1509 OCEAN AVENUE 

JU 4-8950 



BILL'S TRUCKING 

Wm. Cotton, Mgr.-Owner 

41 CONNECTICUT ST. 

UN 1-2696 

Dee's Apparel Shop 

Ruth Davis, Prop. 

Women's 8C Children's Apparel 

463 Castro St. UN 1-7713 

ALEXANDER 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

684 COMMERIAL STREET 
YU J-2491 



nJARY-FEBRUARY, 1961 



Bay Window 

t Continued from Page 3 ) 
Incidentally, the United Press 
International people were out to 
interview and photograph her last 
week, whiih means we'll have a 
pint-sized national celebrity on 
our hands soon. But we do hope she 
gies up that silly doll business 
soon: if she were younger there'd 
be some excuse . . . 

NO SEATS: When Time Maga- 
zine opened its architectural show 
at the Museum of Art it did an al- 
most slick job indeed. There was a 
preview party with almost expert 
catering for 300 of Our Town's 
finest, including a goodly number 
of Time advertisers present. But 
despite the fine bar sei-vice, the 
well laden buffet tables, there was 
one oversight that made it an "al- 
most" affair: No chairs were pro- 
vided the guests. Ever tried eat- 



SUPERIOR AUTO TRIM 

Auto Tops, Etc. 

All Work Guaranteed 
Prices Reasonable 

925 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 
WA 2-2366 



CRAFTSMEN 
TOOL RENTAL, INC. 

THE POWERCRAT LINE 

Sales - Service ' Rental 
Diamnnd Core Drilling 

1267 FOLSOM STREET 
UNderhill 5-8383 San Francisco 

L. H. ARFSTEN-Res. EV 6-:72'; 



DICK CHIN 
REALTY CO. 

Specializing in North Beach 
and Chinatown Properties 

850 JACKSON ST. 

EX. 7-3255 



Ivy's Beauty Salon 

Hdir Slyllrq 
18121/1 Eddy St. JO 7-3684 



ALFRED GEE 

INSURANCE 
amento SI. E 



Leo J. Mahsoud 

Carpcti - Creator i Designer 
37 Clementina SI. YU 6-0217 



ing, a plate in one hand, a glass in 
the other? 

WHITHER WEATHER ? The 
Down Town Assn. has legitimate 
reasons to sue the Weather Guy- 
Here they go about advertising a 
59 degree year-roimd climate — and 
then this Guy lets go with our con- 
tinuing frigid streak, thus bringing 
the climate average plummeting 
toward zero! . - - Speaking of 
chills, noticed the nasty looks be- 
ing un-cordially exchanged by San 
Francisco's two gri'eat AM news- 
papers ? All over a trifling thing 
called Circulation, Circulation, 
Who's got the Circulation? . . . 
The Examiner's most recent act of 
incivility was to kidnap Larry Mc- 
Manus from The Chronicle; Larry 
(who consented to the action) is 
Third and Market's new City Edi- 
tor, Wilson O'Brien moving over to 
assist Sunday Editor . . . 



Kotzbeck Galleries 

Fine Prints - Expert Framing 

Orltrinals in Water Colors 6? Oils 

2031 FILLMORE ST. 

FI 6-5620 



Ruthies School ol' Dance 

Specializing in Children's Dancing 

Expert Training — ^Tap, Ballet, 

Character &? Acrobatic 

2229 Taraval St. OV 1-5226 



Bradley Cameras 

Gifts - Budget Terms 

Free Parking at Richfield Static 

1126 MARKET STREET 

HE 1-7476 



Gold Spike Restaurant 

Italian Dinners • Family Style 

Cocktails, etc. 

527 COLUMBUS AVE. 

GA 1-9363 



Swanson's Residence Club 

Family -Style Dinners 

Recreation 6? TV Rooms at two 

Locations 

860 Sutter St. PR 5-1522 

851 California St. DO 2-9597 



Black & White Garage 

Public Parking Sc Storage 

Mainten.ance SC Lubrication 

955 POST STREET 

PR 5-9680 



Teinescal Rug & 
Upholstery Qeaners 

CIcanmg • Mothproofing 

In Your Homec.rat Our Plant 

4701 Shiittuck Ave. OokKind 

OL 8-2575 



SCULLY DRUG CO. 

Owl Rexal Drugs - Franchised Dealer 

136 GEARY STREET 

SUtter 1-5090 San Francisco 8, California 

1770 Fulton Street - 948 Market Street - 2598 Mission Street 

CHARLES L. TURNER 

REAL ESTATE 

General Insurance - Auto - Fire 

GLENN REALTY CO.— 1851 Divisidero Street 

FI 6-7304 - JO 7-3558 San Francisco 15, Calif- 

UNIT-BILT STORE EQUIPMENT CO. 



Contractors Store Fronts - In 
Manufacturers Store Equipment - Showcases 

175 QUINT STREET Telephone ATwatcr 2-9900 

San Francisco 24, California 

Sanitary Truck Drivers & Helpers 
Local 350 



2940 - 16th STREET 



Fernando Bussi, Secty.-Treasurer 



McWnXUMS RADIO & TV 

Sales - Service • TV Rentals 
BOB KELLY, Manager 
3060 TARAVAL ST f> 



POOL POOL POOL POOL POOL POOL POOL 

MIKE'S PLACE 

COCKTAILS 

SANDWICHES 

LUNCHES & DINNERS 

ITALIAN FOOD 

BILLIARDS 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



521 BROADWAY 



POOL POOL POOL POOL POOL POOL POOl 



The Big Thirst 

(Continued from Page 41 
luducts to the Bay Area and 

San Francisco Water Depart- 
nt which takes the high nioun- 
1 water and, together with ad- 
onal water produced in Bay 
ia reservoirs, serves it to San 
inciscans as well as to neigh- 
s in most of San Mateo County, 
ts of Santa Claia and Alameda 
mties. 

"he Hetch Hetchy Pi-oject pix)- 
Bs approximately two-thirds of 

water supplied to customers, 
an average, with the rest com- 

from such local sources as 
averas Dam in Alameda County 
1 the chain of resei-voirs located 
Ban Mateo County, 
tatistics tell a dramatic story 
Bay Area growth in connection 
h the water system's average 
sumption 31 years ago as corn- 
ed with today. Then it was 52,- 
,000 gallons per day; now it is 
.000,000. 

.nd 31 years ago San Fran- 
:o's average daily consumption 
i 48.900.000 gallons; last fiscal 
r it was 92.000.000 gallons. But 
n more spectacular is the 
wth in average daily consump- 
1 in the burgeoning suburban 
1 outside the city where water 
lold at wholesale prices — from 
10.000 gallons 31 years ago to 
ut 78.000.000 gallons! 



To complete the almost fantastic 
growth story, consider the census 
elements: While San Francisco's 
growth is necessarily leveling off 
within the confiines of its water- 
and San Mateo County-bordered 
area, popvilation trends in the 
neighboring communities of the 
suburban area continue sharply up- 
wai-ds, with increases predicted to 
continue annually at from 7 to 10 
per cent. 

Parenthetically, even with San 
Francisco's population growth 
shifted into very low gear, its 
water consumption continues to 
increase annually. 

Thus, the increasing require- 
ments of the entire area point up 
the need for expansion of the water 
system. And the entirely sense- 
making answer, as submitted by the 
Public Utilities Commission, is the 
$115,000,000 bond issue. 

Bond proposals obviously must 
be of sound architecture if they 
are to win the two-thirds vote of 
acceptance required. And it is sig- 
nificant here to note again the tra- 
ditional support given to utilities 
bond issues in San Francisco. 

The last time a Hetch Hetchy 
bond issue was submitted to the 
voters was in 1955 when they gave 
resounding approval to the $54,- 
000,000 bonds to constmct two 
vast power projects in the moun- 
tains. One — the Cherry, with a 
rated generating capacity of 135,- 



ILAREMONT RESIDENCE 
CLUB 

Room 6^ Board 
$65,00 per month and up 

1500 SUTTER STREET 
PR 6-1860 



THE miA 



Established 1925 

Fully Equipped to render 
Hospital Care 

JOSEPH SARTO. Prop. 

130 VALE STREET 

PL 5-0411 Daly City 



\utomatic Transmission Specialty 



City Towing Service 



4. Fuentes, Jr, 



MIKE & JIM'S GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
3950 - 24th STREET 

VAle 



F. FRAGOMENI & SONS 

Wooltcorth Poultry & Delicatessen 

Corner of Powell and Market Streets 

San Francisco 



000 kilowatts was completed last 
fall; construction of the other, the 
Canyon, will commence once Fed- 
eral permits have been obtained. 

It is both interesting and reas- 
suring that the same two archi- 
tects — the word is used loosely, 
since both are engineers - of the 
Cherry-Canyon powei- bonds are 
also responsible for the present 
proposition to expand the entire 
system: Harry E, Lloyd, General 
Manager and Chief Engineer of 
the Hetch Hetchy Project, and 
James H. Turner, General Man- 
ager and Chief Engineer of the 
Water Department. 

And this time the huge bond pro- 
posal of the two veteran engineers 
has the benefit of the all-out, cata- 
lytic support of a relatively new 
boss. Utilities Manager Robert C. 
Kirkwood. the former State Con- 
troller who was induced to join 
San Franc is co's governmental 
family two years ago by Mayor 
George Christopher. 

Lloyd will leave his Hetch 
Hetchy position at the end of Feb- 
ruary, retii-ing at the mandatory 
age of 65. 

He leaves with the gr-atitude of 
a city for a job superbly well done 
over the 30 year-s devoted to the 
Hetch Hetchy Project. It was back 
in 1928 that San Francisco's late, 
legendai-y City Engineer Michael 
Maui-ice O'Shaughnessy brought 
the young Harry Lloyd to work for 
the Pr'oject. 

And some six years later Lloyd 
saw the completion of the tremen- 
dous aqueduct when the first 
watei-s of Hetch Hetchy cascaded 
into Pulgas Water Temple at Ci'ys- 
tal Springs Lake. That was on Oc- 
tober 2. 1934—16 days after the 
death of his friend and mentor, M. 
M. O'Shaughnessy. 

Lloyd continued on with the Pro- 
ject, investing in it the enthusias- 
tic vigor and perfonnance skill 
that inevitably brought him to one 
of San Francisco's highest posi- 
tions when, in 1951. he was ap- 
pointed head of the entir-e Hetch 
Hetchy system. 

When the $14,000,000 Cherry 
Valley Dam — $10,000,000 of Fed- 
eral flood control funds. $4,000,000 
San Francisco bonds — was filled 
for the fir-st time in 1957, the Board 
of Supervisors took an extraordi- 
nary action. It paid recognition to 
Engineer Lloyd — and to the pr-ose- 
lyting fore-sightedness of Engineer 
O'Shaughnessy — by naming the 
newly-formed reservoir "Lake 
Lloyd." It's about 10 miles distance 
from "O'Shaughnessy Daim." 

On Lloyd's retirement he will be 
succeeded by Oral L. Moore, Hetch 
Hetchy construction engineer, who, 



at age 39, will be the yoimgest boss 
in the Project's long history. 

And announcement of the ap- 
pointment of his successor" caused 
Harry Lloyd to smile contentedly 
and somewhat nostalgically. It 
was jnst 12 year-s ago that he put 
Moore to work as a junior engi- 
neer — and this is history. Hetch 
Hetchy-type histoi-y. swinging full 
circle again. 



Red Cherry Bakery 

New Owners 

FRANK & ERNA HOtSTEIN 

4417 Mliion Street JU 5-9213 



TWELFTH & KIRKHAM 
MARKET 

TIM CORCORAN 
754 KIrkham St. SE |.«40 



Skyway Realty 

Lillio Wong. Broker 

Real Estate - Insurance - Notary Public 

(88 Guerrero UN 3-8950 



Parkside Tavern 

Cocktails - Live Music 

Your Hosts: 

Merv Coleman - Johnny Caruso 

915 Taraval St. SE 1-9525 



Sherwood's Liquors - Foods 

400 San Jose Ave. t^l 7-9853 



Sofronio V. Abreara 

Philippine Consul General 



JACK'S TAVERN 



1931 Sutter St. 



Ben Harlick 
Woodworking Co. 



683 t^cAlllster 



KEAN HOTEL 

Clean - Com'ortable - Convenient 
1018 Misson Sti. MA 1-9291 



Baylacq French Laundry 

Mi Clement St. SK 1-0971 



Leavenworth Market 



1762 Leavenwortti St. 



Ahrens Bakery 

1946 Van Ness Ave. TU 5-5060 



Joe's Mobile Service 

4199 Mission St, JU 5-9922 



Colonial Upholstering Shop 



lUARY-FEBRUARY, 1961 



rUB. LIBR:\fly PERIODICAL ROOM 

Civic Center 

Snn Francisco 2, Calif. 

52 X-1/59 (3077) 3630 



ANCHOR 
REALTY 




Loans - Rentals - Insurance 

2122 MARKET STREET 

MArket 1-2700 San Francisco 14, Calif. 



William O. (Bill) 

DUFFY 

TAX CONSULTANT 
TAX ACCOUNTANT 



2888 MISSION ST. 



AT. 2-4151 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calil 
Permit No. 4507 



CARL N. SWENSON COJNC. 



Contractors 



1095 STOCKTON AVENUE 

Phone CYpress 4-5232 



SAN JOSE 6, CALIFORNIA 



G. W. THOMAS DRAYAGE AND RIGGING CO., INI 

GENERAL DRAYING - FREIGHT FORWARDING 



114- 14th STREET 

HEmlock 1-9624 

San Francisco 



Steel for All Purposes 

815 Bryant St. at 6th MArket 1306 

San Francisco 3, CaHfornia 




RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




JACK ROSENBAUM. SAN FRANCISCO'S "MR. NICE GUY' 



MARCH -APRIL. 1961 




THOMAS M. O'CONNOR 
Public Utilities Counsel 



One of the more familiar faces on the second floor of city hall is the . 
popular Thomas M. O'Connor. Public Utilities Counsel in the City Attoi - 
ney's office. The nidfiv-facpil OPonnor has been a city hall figure since 
ity city attorney by former City At- 
torney John J. O. 'Toole. 

O'Connor was born in San 
Francisco on March 2. 1913. His 
father, Thomas M. O'Connor, Sr., 
a prominent San Francisco at- 
torney, was born in Hollister, 
California, and his mother, the 
formei' Mai'garet Finnigan, is a 
native of San Francisco. She re- 
sides in the family home at 1360 
Fourth Avenue, having lived 
there over 40 years. 

O'Connor attended L a g u n a 
Honda Elementery School, St. 
Ignatius High School, the Uni- 
versity of Santa Clara and the 
University of San Francisco. In 
to the practice of law in thatsc 
1937 he graduated from the Law 
School at USF and was admitted 
to practice law the same year. He 
demonstrated a bent for pub- 
lic service almost immediately thereafter when he became a member 
of the staff of Clerk Paul P. O'Brien of the United States Court of Ap- 
peals in San Francisco. Subsequently, private practice of his profes- 
sion beckoned and he became legal counsel for the Bank of America 
and later joined the law firm of Malone and Sullivan. 

As happened to millions of others. World War II internjpted his 
career while he served as a Special Agent in the United States Navy 
Intelligence Service. Also as happened to millions of others, O'Connor 
met his life partner during the war, and on September 6, 1943 he and 
Lenore Massoni, a San Fiancisco girl, were mariied. 

After his appointment in 1947 as a Deputy City Attorney, O'Con- 
nor took an active part in all phases of the activities of the office, with 
the accent on trying jury cases involving claims against the Municipal 
Railway and the Public Works Deparement. During this period he ac- 
quired an exensive knowledge of the problems and activities of neirly 
every department of city goverament. 

Upon the untimely death of A. Dal Thompson, who was then Public 
Utilities Counsel. City Attorney Dion R. Holm in 1953 appointed O'Con- 
nor to that position. 

The Public Utilities Counsel is, under the City Attorney, the chief 
legal adviser to the Public Utilities Commission, and the several de- 
partments and bureaus under it, including the Municipal Railway, the 
Hetch Hetchy Project, the Water Department and the International 
Aii-port. He also supervises the work of several deputy city attorneys 
assigned to utility problems. During his tenure in this position O'Con- 
nor has handled such important litigation as the Connelly case, involv- 
ing road contracts at Hetch Hetchy, the Trans World Airlines and the 
Western Airlines cases, involving chaiges for airport services, and the 
Blum case, involving the cable cars. 

Aside from his sei-vice to the city, Mr. O'Connor served from 1949 
to 19.51 on the faculty of the Law School of the University of San 
Fi-ancisco. He is currently the President of the Police Athletic League 
Booster's Club, an organization formed last fall to assist the Police 
Athletic League in its youth sports program by relieving the League 
of administrative and financial details. 

O'Connor makes his home at 250 Magellan Avenue with his wife 
and their four children, Thomas, Jr., 16, Katharine, 13, Michael, 6, and 
Lenore Joan, 2. 



MART BANQUET CLUB 

Retirement Luncheons 8C Dinners 
Fashion Shows - Banquets - Dances 

5U to 1 ,000 Pcrson.s. Privacy - Comfort - Parking 

1355 MARKET STREET UN 1-2820 



"My new electric dishwasher frees us 
from after-dinner drudgery!" 

What a life! . . . when you can settle down right after 
dinner with the kitchen neat as a pin! No "K.P." for 
family or friends, for dishes are done automatically. 
Cleaner dishes, too, because they're washed in water 
hotter than your hands could ever touch! See them at 
your dealer — portable (at about $200) or built-in . . . 
You'll agree: Why be a dishwasher — buy one\ 

PG&E Service is your best household bargain ■_■ • f^am/WJ* • 
Pacific Gas and Electric Ccjmpany 




MEL'S TRUCKING 
SERVICE 

30580 ALGUIRE ROAD 
JEfferson 8-4844 

UNION CITY 



bay 



^iAV ] 196) 

wind. 





THE NON-ELECTIVE BRASS: There's an unusual organization 
top San Francisco city employees known familiarly at City Hall as 
he M. E. E. A." which tranlates into "The Municipal Executive Em- 
lyees Association" . . , You might call it a quasi-social, quasi-profes- 
nal, quasi-labor union type of outfit involving virtually every member 
the city's non-elective brass, with a catholicity of interests ranging 
m professional standards to 



aries (its members' salaries, 
it isl to an occasional wine-test- 
; expedition into deepest vin- 
rdland. 




SHERMAN P. DUCKEL 

;;ome April 19 there will be a 
inge in the MEEA command 
lelon when Joe Mignola, Execu- 
e Assistant to CAO Shei'man P. 
ickel, takes over the presidency 
im 'Vic Peterson, the big. good- 
tured, capable Muni Railway 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

~be Xfa^azine of Good Gorernmeni 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14. California 
Telephone HEmlock M2I2 

Subscriptiun $5.00 Per Year 

MARCH- APRIL. 1961 
/OLUME 28 NUMBER 10 



Equipment Superintendent . . . 
Mignola is a careerist in city gov- 
ernment who spent a half dozen 
years or so as Secretary to the 
Planning Commission before 
emerging from a civil service ex- 
amination as No. 1 over a formid- 
able group of contenders for the 
important job as right hand man 
of The Duke ... It was back in 
the wilder days of the Planning 
Commisison that Joe — as well as 
the then Planning Director Paul 
Opperman — sui-vived the frequent 
"I'll fire you all!" threats of Ernie 
Toragno (whose departure from 
this earth resulted in more pub- 
licity, you mayy recall, than he 
had received while on it). 

Methodical, painstaking, intel- 
ligent and pleasant. Joe — who is 
regularly referred to as "Joe Mag- 
nolia" by Dean Dick Chase of the 



DICK CHIN 
REALTY CO. 

specializing in 

NORTH BEACH & 

CHINATOWN PROPERTIES 

813 Clay Street 



When you need TV repairs call a 
thoroughly trained technician to spot 
your trouble and repair it correctly. 

ANY MAKE OR MODEL 
Phone: VA 4-6150 

AC TV CO. 

4080 - 24th Street San Francisco 




simply and t a s t e f u 1 1 y titled 
"Again" that it had been ABC-re- 
vealed "to have led in total circu- 
lation among San Francisco morn- 
ing newspapers." So there, you 
City's Only Home Owned Newspa- 
per! . . . 

THROUGH THE LOOKING 

GLASS: Goodness, the political 

pot is boiling over, isn't it? For 

(Continued on Page 14) 



J. EDWIN MATTOX 
Secretary, Board of Permit Appeals 
City and County of San Francisco 

City Hall Press Room — will be 
bolstered in his new MEEA role by 
Edie Mattox, Board of Permit Ap- 
peals Secretary, as vice president, 
Finance and Records Director Vir- 
gil Elliott as secretary, and Law 
Librarian Bob Everson as treas- 
urer ... In addition to the of- 
ficers, the MEEA Executive Com- 
mittee will include PUC Secretary 
Jim Finn. Asst. City Engineer My- 
ron Tatarian and Don Mazzoni. 
chief of the Muni Railway's claims 
division .... 

FOURTH ESTATE FOREVER: 
Leo Lee, former Examiner assist- 
ant city editor and a past Press 
Club ( during the Powell Street 
era, before the merger with Union 
League! president, has returned to 
San Francisco newspapering; he's 
on The Chronicle . . . Bill Nichols, 
for years one of the better press 
photogs (the old Call-B. on with 
the News-Call Bi. has been ac- 
quired by The Examiner as Chief 
Photog . . . Continuing is the verb 
to use in describing the circulation 
battle between the two SF AM 
giants — with the latest blow 
st.'uck by The Examiner. The Mon- 
arch of the Dailies crowed proudly 
recently in a Page One box story 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Even most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friencis: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 
low, 

U-Drires, 

Limousines, 

Charter Buses 

available 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
'YUkon 6-4000 



^RCH- APRIL. 1961 




JACK ROSENBAUM, Columnist 

They sat in a spitball-tossing row, the four of them, and some- 
times their exasperated teacher would rap her ruler and declare, "You 
boys will never ajiiount to anything." 

But she was wrong. They all .nniounted to something. 

One was executed at San Quen- 
tin for murder. 

Another, a lad named Willie, 
went on to become Father William 
Tobin. rector of a Jesuit Order. 

The third, George Christsopher, 
become Mayor. 

The fourth boy, the smallest of 
the group, seemed least likely to 
achieve fame of any sort. 

But today he is a daily house- 
hold guest in the homes of thous- 
ands of San Franciscans — who read 
his column in the News Call-Bul- 
letin. His name: Jack Rosenbaum. 

It was as natural for Jack Ros- 
enbaum to become a successful 
newspaperman as it was for the 
Lincoln School in its tough South- 
of-Market neighborhood at Fourth 
and Harrison to spew its pupils 
into every walk of life. 

He has an Inquisitive mind, a 
fondness foi' people, a sense of fair 
play ( developed to the point that it 
sometimes kills his choice items), 
and 

two-liners that kindle headline de- 
velopments. 

It is a combination that has 
made him welcome behind closed 
doors, in locker rooms ajid at so- 
cial gatherings, as well as in the 
homes of the paper's readers. 

No more evidence of his profes- 
sional stature is needed than to 
note that when the News and Call- 
BuUetin were merged, Rosenbaum 
retained featured play in the joint 
product. 

Those days before the merger, 
he remembers, were as hectic as 
any spent tossing spitballs at his 
future Mayor and news source. 

News of the long-expected merg- 
er came while he was listening to 
Russ Hodges broadcast a Giants 
game. 

Hodges said, "We have an im- 
portant announcement about a big 
newspaper story. Give it to you 
right after Willie Mays bats." 

Recalls Rosenbaum: "Willie was 
never .so long at the plate." 

After the announcement came. 
Jack's wife, Pauline, inquired: 
"Why don't you go down to the 
paper and find out how you 
stand?" 

Rosenbaum shrugged. "I'll find 
out soon enough." 

At midnight he did. A telegram 
came from the editors of the new 
paper. "Be interested in same 
.status?" 



JACK ROSENBAUM 
News Call-Bulletin 

He was. The coknnn remained 
a fixture. 

The San Francisco scene, viewed 

through the eyes of a man who 

has lived here all of his 52 years, 

'"".""'" " T~ """' ",' parades daily across the typewriter 

flair for composmg brash , ^, „ , . ■ '^ 

of the Polytechnic and University 

of California graduate. 



People frequently ask Rosen- 
baum if he has any assistants. 
"Yes." is the reply. "About 760,- 

000 of them. Everyone is invited." 
But ^side from tips by his read- 
ers, he handles the staggering 
chore of assembling reams of notes 
into a pithy column by himself. 

And it's not all glamorous — 
not even the parties. 

Rosenbaum used to take his wife 
to the dozens of gay soirees he 
must attend each week. But not 
any more. 

"She got tired of standing on 
one foot and then the other while 

1 collared people over martinis," 
he said. "And besides, after one 
party at the Fairmont, I drove 
home, musing about the column, 
only to recall as I crossed Divisa- 
deio I had left Pauline in the hotel 
lobby." 

But despite that one family cris- 
is, Pauline remains not only an 
avid fan but an excellent critic, as 
well as the administrator of their 
Richmond District home which in- 
cludes two small children. 

"She saves me from falling into 
some deadly pitfalls that always 
leer at you in this business," Jack 
commented. "I'll call her at 10 
p.m. to read an item related to me 
by a source and I'll be pretty proud 
of it because it's really funny. And 
after I finish reading it, she'll say, 



HOME REMODELING 



Kitchens - Baths - Additions 
Aliiininuin Siding 



V. PERRUQUET 

General Contractor 

4788 MISSION STREET 
Phone JU 4-SSOO 



'Yes, and it was very funny whc 
Jack Paar told it last Tuesds 
night, too'." 

Rosenbaum, whose bright brow 
eyes peer over a prizefighter's no. 
and a biush mustache, was led in 
the hectic world of a daily colum 
ist by his uncontrolable night-o\ 
tendencies. 

As a sportswritei' on the o 
News, Jack would roam the citj 
nightspots and banquet room 
culling exclusive tidbits for 
highly unusual sports page fea 
ure called "Sports Man Aboi 
Town." He began writing one at 
two-liners that became "mus 
reading for thousands of San Fra: 
ciscans, including many not pa 
ticularly addicted to sports. 

Then one day, nearly 13 yea: 
ago. Editor Frank Clarvoe calU 
Rosenbaum into his office. 

"Son," he said, "you are now 
columnist." 

Rosenbaum cleared his throi 
and choked that there WAS ot 
little commitment he really shou 
take care of first. 

He had invested in a diamor 
ring and marriage license and ha 
a wedding date the following Sui 
day. 

Clarvoe, not a man to stand 1 
the way of romance, told Jack 1 
go ahead, marry the girl. "Tal" 
a three-day honeymoon and the 
let me know about the column." 

Three days later, Rosenbaum r 
longei' was a carefree sportswiitin 
bachelor. He was a married ma; 
with a wife and column to su) 
port. The second responsibilil 
was easily the most staggering. , 

"Somebody said writing a co 
umn is comparable to feeding 
lion." said Rosenbaum. "It has 1 
be fed every day at a certain tiro 
and if its not, it will growl at youi 

After a dozen years, "I still doni 
know what makes an item." i 
(Continued on Page 13) 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 



THE RECORl 



Around and About 



n.v WIIIT HENRY 

Travelers leliirn to San Francisco after trips to foreign shores 
111 rave about colorful spots in distant lands; they speak of radiant 
lex'co or exotic Peru. And then, in the next breath, condemn the 
ick Tar Hotel as being too gaudy or not in keeping with the San 
rancisco wc love. To those critics I say Poppycock and Balderdash, 
like the blue.s and reds of the Jack Tar Hotel. I also like the red of 
amniv's Joynt across the street. 



ompare those spots with the eye- 
ires on the east side of Kearny 
treet between Pine and California. 
r blighted areas south of the slot. 
avers of San Francisco, and I am 
•oud to be one, love to hear visi- 
irs refer to our city as colorful. 
a me. and to many of my friends, 
le Jack Tar Hotel is a welcome 
Idition to our city. To the Texans 
isponsible may I say "WEL- 
DME!" 



walls of the theater where he was 
p<>rf(inning. In his day, every song 
\vrit<-r asked, or hopeil that .1. Aid- 
rich Liblx-y (what a name for a 
matinee idol ? ) would use his com- 
position on one of his programs. 
If J. Aldrieh sang it, it was almost 
sure to become a hit. "After the 
Ball" x\as one of thase. It set a 
record in sheet music sales that, I 
believe, stands to this day; more 
than four million copies. What is 
more, microphones weren't invent- 
ed or even thought of in those days 
eone of his treasured Pos«;«'i«>n« of yesteryear. Join me in a silent 
prayer and tribute to the late, the 
great Peerless Baritone, J. Aldrieh 
Libbey. 



Keci-ntiv a friend of mine showed 



an original copy of "After the 

'.I!" by Charles K. Harris. On the 

pver is a picture of one, possibly 

le most, [Mipular singer of the 

me who was known a,s The Peer- 

ss IJ'iritone, J. Aldrieh Libbey. A group whose interests turn 

e had a voice that, when turned to nostalgic melodies is the Society 

ose. would literallv bend out the for the Preservation and Eucour- 



agement of Barber Shop Quartet 
Singing in America, Inc. It was 
in April, 1938. that the society 
was formed. Invitations were is- 
sued by an attorney named Owen 
C. Cash in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to 
about 14 men of his acquaintance 
to assemble for the purpose of "en- 
joyment of the last remaining ves- 
tige of human liberty guaranteed 
under the Bill of Rights that has 
not been limited in some way. 
Nearly 30 men attended the first 
meeting and formed the organiza- 
tion with the record-breaking name 
and elected the founder to the of- 
fice of "Permanent Third Assist- 
ant Temporary Vice Chairman." 
From this modest beginning the 
organization spread like wild fire 
from the Oklahoma cradle to the 
extremities of the country. Ad- 
dicts of close harmony renewed 
and extended their love for this 
art; members found a release from 
the cares of the fast pace of mod- 
ern living through the medium of 
informal singing. The organiza- 
tion has become a respected inter- 
national institution with members 
in Canada to the north to Alaska 
farther north. As far west as 
Guam and east to Maine. 

Next fall there will be a concert, 
an annual event, in San Francisco. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



PETERSON SUPPLY 
CO. 

NEON SIGN SUPPLIES 
iind EQUIPMENT 

480 Fifth Street 

DOuglas 2-1695 San Francisco 7 



MATTEUCCI 
BROS. 

Choice Meats 

POULTRY ■ FISH ■ EGGS 

2794 - 24th STREET 

VA 4-5419 



ANNOUNCING 

Mr. Donald M. Paul 

Now Man.iging-Owner of 

Pem Manufacturing Co., 
Inc. 

1474 Egbert Ave VA 4-3713 

San Francisco 



SWISS AMERICAN SAUSAGE CO, 

**Marconi Brand" 

35 WILLIAMS AVENUE 
San Francisco 24, Calif. ATwater 8-5400 

FRANK WERNER 

Bally Shoe§ for Men, Women & Children 

GRANT AVENUE AT POST - SU 1-6240 

255 GEARY AT UNION 

12 STONESTOWN 

38 EAST 4th AVENUE - SAN MATEO 

HEARST CORPORATION 

HEARST BUILDING 
San Francisco, California 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Inflight & Industrial Food Services 

1461 OLD BAYSHORE BLVD. DI 2-6361 

BURLINGAME, CALIF. 



Jack GanshurR, General Mana 



D Guttmann 




CLARENCE X. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



Fruitvale Chapel 
1580 FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIlog 3-4114 



Elmhurst Chapel 
8901 E. 14th STREET 

NEptune 2-4343 



ARCH - .^PRIL. 1961 



1 


IL 


i 




1^ 


m 

kj \> 


1 








^^1^^^^9 


1 


' ■'. 




^^9 




The 6rst thing a San Francisco Firefighter is taught is that the saving of a life left, one fireman lies across boy's head and face as another jams his body Uj 

is the most important part of hisjoh. These on-the-spot photos taken by Chct into cave to keep sand from re-covering boy. In second photo, the happ 

Bom, Fire Dept. Photographer, on March 31st, show how Firemen were able ending. (All photos by CHET BORN, San Francisco Fire Departmec 

to save the life of a small bay completely covered by a cave-in. In photo, upper Photographer. 



PLaza 6-4300 

n A R V I S Construction, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

W. C. "Bill" Harr, President 
946 EL CAMINO REAL 
South San Francisco, California 

SYLVANIA - PHILCO - ADMIRAL ■ MOTOROL.A • DUMONT 

SALES SERVICE 

AI] Milken and Models 

DAY & NIGHT Television Service Co. 

Open 9.00 A.M. - 10;00 P.M. 7 Days a Week 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 

UNderhill 3-0793 San Francisco, Calif. 

THE PROGRESSIVE CLUB 

UN. 1-0859 95 Capp Street 



CARROLL BROTHERS 

ARTISTIC MEMORIALS AND INSCRIPTIONS 

Phone PL 5-2818 

STUDIO: 1730 MISSION ROAD 

Between Cypress Lawn and Holy Cross Cemeteries 
South San Francisco 



DIINN ROOFING CO. 



1429 Valencia Street 



AT 2-5666 



San Francisco 



GRANDI ELECTRIC CO. 

Industrial - Commercial - Rcsidcnti.il Wiring isf Alterations 
3556 Sacramento Street WA 2-2141 

THOMASSER & ASSOCIATES 

Caterers - Wines & Spirits 
1228 Twentieth Avenue San Francisco 11 



THE RECX1KI 




I April 1st, at 12:20 a.m.. Truck 6, Truck 12, Battalion 5 and Division 3, and were able to catch the man just as he passed out (photo upper left). In 

:ponded to an alarm at Christmas Tree Point, found a distraught citizen photo, upper right. Firemen White and Reddick can be seen delivering their 

ip a metal tower some 100 feet high. The man, threatening to jump or burden into the eager hands of the waiting Truckmen. (Photos by CHET 

lb an electric wire, would not come down. Two Firefighters, Lieut. Ernie BORN, S.F.F.D.) 
ddick and Operator Chas, White, climbed to the top of an aerial ladder 



BAYHA, WEIR & FINATO, INC. 

Mechanical & Electrical Engineers 
812 Howard Street YU 2-1200 

Foster & Kleiser 

OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 



1675 Ed«lv Street 



San Francisco 



Phone OLympic 2-8210 Day or Night 

RED TOP ELECTRIC CO. 

EMERYVILLE, INC. 

Electrical Construction and Maintenance 

4377 Adeline Street Emeryville 8, California 

AUTOMOTIVE 

The SAFETY HOUSE, Inc. 

982 Post Street ORdway 3-3505 

San Francisco 9. Calif. 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

1745 FOLSOM STREET 

San Fraiici.sco 3, California 

UNderhiU 1-1455 

DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

Sweetheart Hants & Bacons 
"Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 

AVAILABLE FOR CHARTER DELUXE 45 PASSENGER BUSES 

Air Condit.nncd 

BARRETT TRANSPORTATION CO. 

735 HARRISON STREET - DOuglas 2-1016 

LATE MODEL UDRIVE CARS 

NATIONAL CAR RENTALS 

■571 POST STREET - GRaystone 4-5300 



kRCH . APRIL, 1961 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 Oily Hall MA 1-016! 

• liMtrpre Christopher, Mayor 

Joseph J. Allen, Executive Secretary 
Mark L. Gerstle III, ConHdential Secretary 
Margaret Smith, Personal Secretarj' 
John Tj. Montz. Administrative Assistant 
John r>. Sullivan. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS. BOARD OF 

3.15 Oitv Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Dr. rharle.s A. Ertola. President. 

2.';3 Columbus Ave. 
William C. Blalte. 90 Polsonl St. 
Joseph M. Ca.sev, 2S2,'! Ocean Ave. 
Il.irold S. nobbs. Sr,l California St. 
John .7. Perdon. 155 Monteomerv St. 
James L,. Hallev. S70 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 70S Market St. 
Peter Tamaras. 36 San Rafael Way 
Joseph E. Tinney. 2517 Mis.slon St. 
J. Jo.seph Sullivan. Ill Sutter St. 
Alfonso .T. Zirpoll, 300 Montgomery St. 

Robert J. Dolan. Clerk 

Ijillian M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 
Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — James J 

Sullivan. Blake. McMahon 
County. State and National Affairs — Ferdon, Casey 

Halley 
Education, Parks and Recreation — Rolph, Blake, J 

Joseph Sullivan 
Finance, Revenue and Taxation — Halley, Ferdon 

Zirpoll 
Judiciary, Legislative and Civil Service — Dobbs 

Casey. Rolph 
Police — Casey. Dobbs. James J. Sullivan 
Public Buildings. Lands and City Planning — J 

Joseph Sullivan. Dobbs, James J. Sullivan 
Public Health & Welfare— Zirpoll, Halley, McMahon 
Public Utilities— McMahon. Ferdon. Zirpoll 
Streets and Highways — Blake. Rolph. J. Joseph 

Sullivan 
Rules— Ertola, Dobbs, Halley 

ASSESSOR 

101 Citv Hall 
Russell L. Wolden 



CITY ATTORNEY 

206 Citv Hall 
Dion R. Holm 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

017 Alontgomery St. 
■rlionias C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

7110 Montgomery St. 
Edward T. Mancuso 
SHERIFF 

331 City Hall 
Matthew C. Carberry 
TREASURER 

110 City Hall 
John J. Goodwin 



KL 2-1911 
HE 1-132: 
EX 7-0500 
EX 2-1535 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR. JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor, City Hall UN 1-S552 

H A. VanDerZee. I'residing Gerald S. Levin 

Raymond J. Arata Francis McCarty 

Carl H. Allen John B. Molinari 

Byron Arnold Edward Molkenbuhr 

Walter Carpenell Clarence W. Morris 

C. Harold Caultield Harry J. Neubarth 

Melvyn I. Cronin Edward F. O'Day 

Pi'eston Devine Charles S. Peery 

Nortnan Elkington George W. Schonfeld 

Timothy I. Fitzpatrlck William P. Traverse 

.loseph Karesh Alvin E. Weinberger 

.loseph M. Cummins, Secretary 

4S0 City Hall UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor, City Hall KL 2-3008 

.Fohn W. Bussey. Presiding Clarence Linn 
Albert A, Axelrod 
Ilobert .1. Drewes 
Andrew J. Eyman 
Clayton W. Horn 
Leland J. Lazaxus 

Ivan L. Slavlch, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-300S 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



William O'Brien 
Raymond O'Connor 
Lenore D. Underwood 
James J. Welsh 
George E. Maloney 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

MARCH, 1961 

TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

164 City Hall KL 2-300S 

James M. Cannon, Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at 8 P,M. 
Daniel J. Collins. Foreman 
Sydney W. Hopkins. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Consulting Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St. YU 6-2950 

John D. Kavanaugh, Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrlck Vaughan. Chairman, 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 399 Fremont St. 
William Moskowitz. 1901 California Street 
Robert A. Peabody, 456 Post St. 
Adolph L. Pierotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Prank Ratto, 526 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5740 



JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 445 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger, 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan. 501 Haight St. 
Rev. James B. Plynn. 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green. 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2S9 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D, Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean, 

940 - 25th St. N.W.. Washington. D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator. Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley. M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Nell Sinton. 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagopian, Mills Tower 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson, 2836 Vallejo St. 

William E. Knuth, S. F. State College 

Joseph Esherick, 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 I^rkin St. HE 1-2: 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 

Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. 
James S. Kearney. 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Meln. 315 Montgomery St. 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter. 142 - 27th Avenue 
Mark R. Sullivan 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 

Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 
Thomas G. Miller, Secretary ■ 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION I 

151 City Hall HE 1-1: 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Wm. Kilpatrick, President. 827 Hyde St. 

Richard C. Ham. 200 Bush St. ] 

Hubert J. Sober, 155 Montgomery St. ■ 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel I 

DISASTER CORPS j 

45 Hyde St. HE 1-S 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.). Director 
Alex X. McCausland, Public Information Officer 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-^ 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 
170 Fell St. 

Mrs. Claire Matzger. President. 3550 Jackson St. 

Mrs. Ijawrence Draper. Jr.. 10 Walnut St. 

Adolfo de Urioste. 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Edward Kemmitt. 601 Polk St. 

Samuel Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 

■Toseph A. Moore. Jr.. 351 California St. 

Elmer P. Skinner. 220 Fell St. 

Dr. Harold Spears. Supt. of Schools and Serf 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

Bert Simon. President, 1350 Folsom St. 

Dr. Peter Angel. 1S67 - 15th Ave. 

Philip Dindia, 536 Bryant St. 

William P. Murray. Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

61 Grove St. HE 1-i 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook. President. 220 Montgomery S' 
George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell, M.D., 977 Valencia St. 
Frank J. Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave. 
Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Robert B. Hunt, Acting Executive Dire. 



Ex-Officio Members 

ttee. Board of 



Chairman, Finance Co 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3-51 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jefferson A. Beaver, Chairman, 2400 Sutter St. 
Al F. Mailloux, 200 Guerrero St. 
Charles R. Greenstone, 2 Geary St. 
Charles J. Jung, 622 Washington St. 
Jacob Shemano. 988 Market St. 

John W. Beard. Executive Director 
PARKING AUTHORITY 

536 Golden Gate Ave. PR 6-11 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 
John E. Sullivan, Chairman, 69 West Portal 
Jay E. Jclllck. 564 Market St. 
Donald Magnin. 77 O'Farrell St. 
G. Haltzer Peterson. 116 New Montgomery SI. 
David Thomson. 65 Berry St. 

Vinlng T. Fisher, General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 



THE RECOII 



ERMIT APPEALS. BOARD OF 
227 City Hall 



JlLits eve 



W.'diiesdny 



t 3:00 r..M. 
rit, 8S4 Fols 



Vllllam H. H. Davis. Presld 
. Max Moor.'. r.!IS Potroro Ave. 
ieoPK.' Cllllll. 401II - inth Ave. 
Clarence .1. Walsh. 2450 - 17lh St. 
Brnost I, West. 20,'; MontKomory St. 
J. Edwin Mattox. Sooretary 

>OLICE COMMISSION 

Hall of Justice SU 1-2 

Meets every Monday at 6:00 P.M. 

larold I!. MoKinnon. President. 25,i California !^ 
>aiil A. UlsslnKer. P.d. Hox 2442 
?hoinas J. Mellon. 390 First St. 

Thomas Cahlll. Chief of Pollee 
Alfred J. Nelder, Deputy Chief of Polie.^ 
I. Thomas ZaraKOza, Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel McKleni. Chief of Inspectors 
Lt. Wni. .1. O'Brien. Commission Secretary 
Capt. John T. Kutlcr. Department Secretary 

•UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center HK 1-2 

Meets 1st Tuesday each month at 4 P.M. 

I. U-e Vavuris. President. 9(10 Geary St. 

ohn M. Hransten. 665 - 3rd St. 

V. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 

;o.se M Panucchl. 1445 Stockton St. 

larKaret nirdner. 1360 Ix>nibard St. 

ohn 10. Gurich. 300 Montpromerv St. 

Lev. ■William Turner. 1042 Broderick St. 

trs. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 

niton K. I.#petich. 1655 Polk Street 

ilhert K. Schwabacher, Jr., 100 Montgomery St. 

'homas W. S. Wu, D.D.S.. 1111 Stockton St. 

\Villl:ini R. Hi>lman. Librarian 

Frank A. Clarvoe. Jr.. Secretary 



UBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
>on Fazackerley. President. .'^51 How 
tuart N. Greenberg, 765 Polsom St. 
leorKe K. Hansen, 215 Market St. 
lerry W. Uoden. 1999 Broadway 
■homas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 



Bureaus and Departments 
ccounts. 2S7 City Hall H 15 1-2121 

George Negri, Director 
.irport, San Francisco International, S. F. 2S 

Belford Brown. Manager PL. 6-0500 

letch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PK 5-7000 

Oral L.. Moore, Chief Engineer and General 
Manager 

unicipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. Fl 0-5056 

Vernon \V, Anderson, General Manager 
ersonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5650 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
ubiic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
titer Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7iirai 

James H. Turner. General Manager 

UBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St. EX 7-6000 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays each month 
at 9 A.M. 

icholas A. Loumos, President, 220 Montgomery St. 
Irs. John J. Murray. 1306 Portola Drive 
rilllam P. Scott. Jr.. 249 Natoma St. 
icqueline Smith. 2015 Steiner St. 
rank H. Sloss. 351 California St. 

Ronald H. Born. Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Eulala Smith. Secretary 

ECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge. Golden Gate Park Sl< 1-4S60 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 

Salter A. Haas, Sr., 98 Battery St., President 

eter Bercut, 1 Lombard St. 

[arj- Margaret Casey, 532 Mission St. 

nillam M. Coffman, 525 Market St, 

r. Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

Ta. Joseph A. Moore. 2590 Green St. 

>hn F. Conway. Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. KImbell. General Manager 
Paul N. Moore, Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

.■,2.-. Colilen ll.ltr Av.-. I'.V ?,. 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Everett Griffin, Chairman, 406 California St. 
James B. Black, Jr.. 120 Montgomery St. 
James A. Folger. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
ivrcnce R. Palaclos. 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann. Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

93 Grove Street HE 1- 

Meots every Wednesday at 3 P..M. 

William T. Reed, President, 2151 - 18th Ave. 

I'hilii) S. Dalton, 1 Sansome St. 

■ lies M. Hamill. 120 Montgomery St. 

Daniel A. Diez. 2251 - 35th Ave. 

Martin F. Wormuth, 4109 Pacheco 
Ex-Officio Members 

President, Board of Supervisors 

City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrooce, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA 1- 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
I-'rcderic Oampagnoli. President. 300 Montgome 
u.iie D. B.iinett. 22.1 Bush St. 

ml. \ ri. nil T, Ki \'..rl. -a St. 
1,1 I , • ILil. , ,lr , ■ •:; Mark.'t St. 



li'ui \ 1 1. i,.i, ,.„,i,. i;i .\hiy wood Drive 
is.in Mil, I, :;;;:■, Mo.HKoinery St. 
hiM .1 .MiiMo. .535 North Point 

I n S.iyatl. 35 Aptos Ave. 

Pli .1. A, .Slern. 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. ManagiiiK Direc-tor 

E. Lawrence George, .^ecrotar.v 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2040 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

.\grirulUiial lUdg.. Einli:ircadero SC l-.1on.1 

■in.inrt L. Bozzini. Coniroissioner 
■mers' Market, Bayshnre & Alemanv 

Thos. P. Christian. Market Master MI 7-942.", 

CORONER 

650 Merchant St. DO 2-0161 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

0. Townsend, Chief 
Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Plant 

FINANCE & RECORDS. DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE i-:i:;i 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk & Recorder HE 1-2121 

.M.irlin .1. Mongan, 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea. 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters 

Charles A. Rogers. 107 City Hall 



Collector 



nti. 107 



Hall 



HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-L'121 



L. J. LeGuennee, 160 Otis 
HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEnilock 1-2121. Ext, 704 
Lloyd Conrich. 4.'. - 2nd Street 



Frank E. Oman. 557 - 4th St. 

Terence J. O'Sullivan, 200 Guerrero St. 

Bernard A. Cumniings. Secretary. 254 City Hall 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building CX 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Iir. Knineis .1. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
.\rtliur c. l;iinis. Asst. Director Public Health for 

llospiuil .Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou. Suix.riiitendent 
Laguna Honda Home. 7lh Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

U.uis A. .MoiMii. Siiii. riiit.ndent MO 4-15SO 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. E, All.er.s. Superintendent MI 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake, Adm. Snii.rlntendent HE 1-2S00 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 

H. Brooks Larter. 

Assistant Director. Administrative 
J. Archer. 
Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Acco 



City 



J. J. MeCIo 



Hull 

Cliiirles W. Grifrith. Cite Anliitect 
Building Inspection, 275 cliv Hall 

liolierl c. Lew. Superintendent 
Building Repair. 2:;2:i Armv 

A H, i:i<eTil..rg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 2.S0 City Hall 

Sidnr\- I'ranklin. Supervisor 
Egineering. :!.-,;i city Hall 

Clllfnrtl .1. i;.-.rlz. Cliv Engineer 
Sewer Repair £. Sewage Treatment, 2323 

Waller li. Jones 
Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. 

I'.ernai-d M. Crotty. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. 

K. D. lirown. Superintendent 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 

Ben Henas. Purchaser of Suiiplles 

T. i'V Conway, Chief Assistant 
I'lirehaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, sun Quint 

A. M. Flaherl.\-. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies. 15th and Harris 



HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HR 1 

HE 1 

Army i 
HE 1- 
HB 1- 



2121 
-2121 



I,.' 



nd Repr 



Ro 



REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

93 Grove St. 1 1 IC 1-2121 

Philip L, Rezos. Director of Properly 
James T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 City Hall HE 1-2I2I 

O. C. Skinner. .Ir, 

SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park 
Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 



DA 1-5100 



CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 




Lincoln Park 


BA 1 


Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April, Ju 
3:30 P.M. 


ne. Oct. 


Board of Trustees 





•Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President, 

2 Pine St. 
Walter E. Buck. President, 235 Montgomery St, 
E. Raymond Armsby. Ill Sutter St. 
fyouis A, Benoisf ST iM-iimm St. 
Mrs. c. Ti.liiii II It! ii,.r, ,.11 Hill. .San Mateo 
hington St. 



St. 



ello Blvd. 
ry St. 



I -harl.s .M;ivei-, San I 

William W, .M.iii, :;i,', 

I 'avid n, y,lell-r.no\, Iir. clen Ellen. Calif. 

,iohn X. i;.,,v. kiMis. :;:::; .\iontgomerv St. 

Williaiii R. Wallace, Jr.. 100 Uush St. 

Whitney Warren. Ill Telegrardi Hill Blvd. 



Harold L, Ze 



1 Bu.sh St. 
tx-Officio Members 



Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe, Jr.. Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park l;A 1-2067 

.Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. .Vpril. June. Oct.. 2.30 P.J' 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron. Honorary President, 
Hillsborough 

Ijirliard l:li,-,in. President. 1059 Russ Budg. 

Mi. h, 1 1 . w. ill. 126 Post 

Mi.^s la.ui.-. .\. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

Sbeld.m c,. ivioper. 020 Market St. 

Charl.s d.> Young Thieriot. 1S02 Floribunda. Hills 



R. Gwin 



'ollli 



•lifford V. He 



T'lliiii 
Tuck, 



3690 Washington St. 
mbucher. 220 Bush St. 
niii. St. Francis Hotel 

111 %. II, ::72.-, Washingto 
s. !• ; Washington St. 

1 .l..lles SI. 



lUulii 



Charles Page, 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Flloli San Mateo C 

Ex-Offlcio Members 
Mayor 
President, Recreation & Park Commissi! 

Dr. Walter Hell. Director 

Col. Ian F. M. Macalplne. Secretary 



Roliei-t J. I-:verson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 
2500 - 16th St. 
Charles W. Friedrichs, Secretary 



MA 1-1700 
ind Manager 



ARCH -APRIL, 1961 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 5) 

A short while ago I was given 
a boolilet describing the Shriners 
Hospital in San Francisco. It i£ 
with pleasure that I quote three 
paragraphs from it: 

"One of the gravest and most 
complex responsibilities of society 
is the care and guidance of crippled 
children whose parents are unable 
to pay for their treatment. When 
not given proper treatment anci 
care, such children are deprived of 
normal associations and develop- 
ment, and frequently create a dis- 
torted and unhappy family life 
Many thousands are denied the op- 
poi'tunity of becoming self-support- 
ing citizens by conditions beyond 
the control of their families. 

"It was recognition of this urg- 
ent responsibility which, over 2o 
years ago. prompted the Shrine 
organization to establish the Shrin- 
ers Hospital for Crippled Children. 
These hospitals provide free care 
and surgical treatment to crippled 
or deformed children regardless of 
I'ace, color or ci'eed, provided their 
parent are unable to pay for med- 
ical services. Their purpose is to 
he'p these children lead a normal, 
happy life and become responsible, 
sell-supporting citizens. 

"The San Francisco unit of the 
Shriners Hospital for Crippled 
Children was organized in 1923, 
and is one of sixteen hospitals in 
the United States, Canada, Mexico 
and Hawaii, owned and operated 
by a non-profit corporation estab- 
lished by the ancient Arabic Order 
of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine 
of North America. This corpora- 
tion is directed by a Board of 
Trustees acting through local 
Boards of Governors in each of the 
hospital districts. An Advisory 
Committee of leading orthopedic 
surgeons assists the Board of Trus- 
tees in the selection of the Chief 
Surgeon of each hospital. General 
management is entrusted to an 
Administrator who is appointed by 
the Trustees." 

In my next column I will con- 
tinue with more excerpts from the 
most informative booklet on the 
Shrine Hospitals. 




WH.^iT'S MY WINE? — Joe Allen, Mayor Christopher's executive sec- 
retary, holds aloft a bottle of California and a bottle of foreign wine 
while two participants in a "blind" comparative tasting — Chronicle 
Citj' Hall Reporter Mel Wax (left) and Walls Fargo-American Trust 
Vic" President Leo M. Bianco — puzzle over which wine they like best 
and wlierc it was grown. The blind tasting was held on a recent MEEA 
tour of tile Napa Valley wine country. California wines swept the 
Champagne first places and tied with the foreign Rose and claret, with 
th.^ resultant total points: 57 for ('alifornia, 55 for the foreignl And 
a home-State price note: total pric<> of foreign wines was $20.51, while 
the California wine price tag wa.s $10.78. 



Basketball 
Bowli 


- Baseball - Football - Golf - Softball - Track - Tennis 
ig - Uniforms - Trophies 8C Rentals - Ski Rentals 


Flyin 


^ 


Goose Sporting 

"GOOSE" GOSLAND 

1404 Taraval Street 


Goods 


MO 1-1909 




San Francisco 16 



THE IDEAL HOTEl 

Clean - Comfortable 
Economical 



1334 Stockton St. 
SIJ 1-9613 



The Sperry and Hutchinson Company 



Always Shop Where 
Vou See This Sign 



Serving Nationally 
since 1896 





BELL BAZAAR 

Toys - Gifts - Cards 
3030- 16th Street UN 1-2824 



BIRDIE'S PET SHOP 

Pets 8C Supplies 
141 1 ■ 45th Ave. LO 4-6482 



PACIFIC HEIGHTS 
RESIDENCE CLL'B 

■We Try to Make You Happy" 
1901 Pacific Ave. TU 5-9725 



STOVALL'S 

Ladies dC Gents Tailoring, 

Alterations, Valet Service 

510 Powell St. San Francirco 

GArfield 1-9285 Bill Stovall 



Gurley-Lord Tire Co.. 

THE GENERAL TIRE 

For SAFE Human Mileage 

Mission at 1 1th St. HE I-I8OO1 

San Francisco 3, Calif. 



Greetings fri 



Major Lawrence Pilsbury 

354 ARGUELLO BLVD. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Flash Photo Service 

Photos Finished Sc Developed 

Also Color 

Frederick & Marceline Castlenian 1 

573 Mission Street DO 2-6840 



LITTLE DUTCH 
LAUNDROMAT 

Merle 3C Lorraine Tabor 
2900 Taraval St. LO 6-4200 

MOLLERICH & CO. 

550 MISSION STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Russian Life Daily 

2450 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Black & White Garage 

Public Parking SC Storage 

Maintenance Si. Lubrication 

955 POST STREET 

PR 5-9680 



THE RECOH 



BILL'S PLACE 

Home of ihc Hamburger 
arid Hoi Dog 

BILL FREY 



2252 Clement St. 



BELL JEWELERS 

Complete Line of Jewelry 
Expert Watch SC Clock Repairing 

715 Irvino; Street 

MO I-I080 



DON'T GO BUGS- 
GO CRAISE 




' ..tflfO. CU- 

sincf I9MI 

FREE INSPECTION 

WA 2-1666 

2700 Geary San Francisco 

Eric Livingston, Pres. 

CRANE Pest Control 



HOF BRAU 

O'Farrell & Powell 
San Francisco 2 



MARK -STEVENS 

QUALITY FISH 
6f POULTRY 

1145 Market St. 

Between 7th & 8th Streets 

Located in Giannini Food Fair 

Paul Sleye,i< 



I960 Is Record Year 
For Farmers' Market 




JOHN BRUCATO 
Superintendent of Agriculture 

The San Francisco Farmers' 
Market has recorded 1960 as one 
of the most successful years in its 
17'; year history, based on number 
of farmers using the facility, ton- 
nage handled and patrons accom- 
modated. 

At the same time. Chief Admin- 
istrative Officer Sherman P. Du- 
ckel. under whose supervision the 
Market operates, said by the end 
of 1962 the Market could "burn its 
mortgage." 

The $243,963 capital investment 
in the city owned and operated 
Market is now 90 per cent paid. 
As of Nov. 30, 1960, a total of 
$217,271 had been returned to the 
city from fees. 

The investment includes pur- 
chase of the present Alemanv Blvd. 
site, construction of two rows of 
displa.y stalls and an administra- 
tion building, as well as parking 
facilities for the ever - growing 
number of Market patrons. 

The Market operates under an 
ordinance requiring that only bona 
fide farmers may use the facility 
and must pay fees in an amount 
that will cover operating expenses 
and eventually repay the city's in- 
vestment. Only fresh and dried 
fruits, fresh vegetables, nuts and 
honey may be sold at the Market, 
which provides a common meeting 
ground for producer and consumer. 



ROBERTA'S 

Drc^smakiiiR • .Mtcr.itions 

2477 SACRAMENTO ST. 

FI 6-4616 



EAGLESON 
EXOIXEER!^ 



615 Sansome Street 

San Franciso 11, California 



Solly Schuman 

CATERING COMPANY 

City Park, — B.ill P,irks — Stjdiums — Fairs — Air Show.s 
Race Tracks — Auto Races — Parties — Barbecues 6? Other Functions 

ROSE SCHUMAN 

Foot of Van Ness Avenue at Aquatic Park 

SEabnght 1-1899 San Francisco, Calif. GRaystonc 4-9791 

Carlson Termite Control 

PROTECT YOUR HOME — YOUR PROPERTY 

CALL ON US FOR PROMPT CONSULTATION 

HONEST ESTIMATES 

Liccn.sed hy State oi California 



1331 Nineteenth Avenue 



LO 4-3030 



Higgins Funeral Home and Ambulance Service 

^'We Invite Your Confidence'^ 

1510 "A" STREET 
PL 7-4343 ANTIOCH, CALIF. 

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP 

BERT WEIBLE — District Manager 

2141 Lombard St. JO 7-1860 



UlCH- APRIL. 1961 



New Show Policy At 
Morrison Planetarium 




ROBERT C. MILLER 

Academy Director 

Morrison Planetarium in Golden 
Gate Park inaugurated a new pol- 
icy of special astronomy shows. 
Every Saturday, in addition to the 
regular week-end showings at 2:00, 
3:30 and 8:30 p.m.. the Planteari- 
um offers "budget matinees" de- 
signed especially for children at 
11:00 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. The 
admission for all, adults and chil- 
dren alike, is only 20(t per peison. 
Repeated requests for such shows 
have caused the expansion in the 
Planetarium's presentations. 

The content of the shows is 
much the same as that featured in 
whatever is the current attraction 
at San Francisco's beautiful The- 
atre of the Sky at the California 
Academy of Sciences. 



"Hire a Veteran Week" 
To Be Observed in May 

Albert H. Long, chairman of the 
San Francisco Advisory Commit- 
tee of the California Department 
of Employment, recently called at- 
tention to the fact that the week 
beginning May 7th will be ob- 
served as "Hire a Veteran Week." 

"Purpose of the week," said Mr. 
Long, "IS to draw attention to the 
public of the occupational qualifica- 
tions of veterans of the armed 
forces, and to urge employei's to 
place their orders for workei-s with 
the local offices of the Department 
of Employment so that veterans 
may receive priority of i-eferral to 
jobs as provided by law." 

For many years Mr. Long has 
been active in veterans affairs in 
San Francisco. Recently retired 
from the Department of Agricul- 
tiu'e, he keeps busy as a volunteer 
worker for benefits for veterans 
and a few months ago was made 
chairman of the Advisory Commit- 
tee that so capably serves the De- 
partment of Employment. His mili- 
tary career began in 1913 when he 
joined the army. Four years latei- 
he enlisted in the Marine Corps in 
whichc he distinguished himself 
until his retirement from military 
life in 1937, at which time he was 
a Master Sergeant. 

"The employment of veterans i.s 
a year 'round objective with us," 
concluded Mr. Long, "and anything 
we can do that will focus attention 
to employers regarding the bene- 
fits of employing veterans is our 
never-ending aim." 



William O. (Bill) 

DUFFY 

TAX COISSULTANT 
TAX ACCOUNTAIST 



2888 MISSION ST 



AT. 2-4151 



Continental Service Co, 

260 Fifth Street 
San Francisco 3, California 

The Bank of TOKYO 
of California 

64 Sutter Street YU 1-1200 

San Francisco 

Cecil's Transmission Service 

Overhauled — Exchanged — Repaired — Automotive Service 

Cecil H. Doss 

No. 4 Joost Avenue — JU 6-7979 — San Francisco, Calif. 

GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

NONA REALTY 

Nona Harivick - Realtor 

533 BALBOA STREET 

Bus. BA. 1-5576 Res. BA. 1-3504 

HASTIE 

Real Estate Inspection and Repair, Inc. 

Complete Termite Inspection Reports 

Termites - Fungi - Beetles 

225 CAPITOL AVENUE 

San Francisco 12, Calif. DElaware 3-3700' 

HARRY H. HASTIE 



THE RECOH 



ROSENBAUM 

(Continued from Page 41 
iminiites. "Even the leadeis are 
)t sure. I've been stopped on the 
reet by one guy who will say. 
ack. your column really sparkled 
day.' Then half a block away 
lothcr guy eyes me sadly and la- 
ents, 'Boy. you must of been 
■unk when you wrote that.' What 
n you do?" 

Then there are the "innocent" 
>ms that go awry. 
Like the time Jack meant to 
rite "the comely girl " and it came 
it "homely." He had to elude an 
itire high school football team 
at sought him out in defense of 
eir pretty classmate. 
Rosenbaum is a quiet sort of cru- 
der who stirs warmly rewarding 
suits with his sensitive approach 
the "little man's" problems. 
In 1951, he met an unhappy 
ung man named Martin Dunne 
lo had come from Ireland, been 
afted. and lost a leg in Korea. 
)w a civilian again, he wasn't 
gible for a city, state or federal 



job because he hadn't been in this 
countiy five years and therefore 
wasn't a citizen. This seemed mis- 
erably unfair to Jack, and he told 
his readers about it. As a result 
of his campaign. Congiess changed 
the law. and the Disabled Ameri- 
can Veterans gave Rosenbaum an 
award. 

A few months ago, an 88-year- 
old pensioner, Eddie Anderson, 
trudged into the paper and bought 
a three-line advertisement, hoping 
someone would I'emember him with 
a card on his birthday. Rosenbaum 
spied the ad and stuck a line in his 
column suggesting that his readers 
take four minutes and four cents 
to remember Eddie with a card. 

They did. 

Before the deluge ended, Eddie's 
room was flooded with more than 
3,000 cards and dozens of birthday 
caltes. 

Moie recently, a biting four-liner 
in Rosenbaum's column about a 
proposed tax on San Francisco's 
sidewalk flower vendors kicked up 
a magnificent fuss that eventually 



became banner headlines in all the 
dailies. When the whole ta.\ re- 
adjustment idea was abandoned, 
largely Ijccause of the uproar, the 
flower vendors sent special thanks 
to Rosenbaum "who became the 
very first to espouse our cause." 

Rosenbaum has won numerous 
accolades over the years, but the 
one he prizes most was the Piess 
Club Award in 1955 for the best 
feature story. The story was his 
tribute to his father, "the govei-- 
nor," written at his death, and it 
had to be the finest writing that 
heart and head could put on papei-. 

Even with success rearing its 
handsome head over the Rosen- 
baum column for 1.3 years. Jack 
still finds days when he envies the 
less hectic life of a sportswritei- 
without that hungry lion to feed. 

"This is like a store or a restau- 
rant," he said. "You open it up 
every day. and you don't know 
who will coine in." 

When a string of fascinating 
people spilling sparkling witti- 
cisms in their wake cross the Ros- 



enbaum path in the course of an 
item-gathering evening, "this is 
the best job in the world." 

But there arc dog days "when 
everybody seems to have taken a 
vow of silence and I fei-vently wish 
I was back covering the sports 
arenas." 

Rosenbaum grins a tight little 
grin and confides : 

"The most lonesome feeling in 
the world is at midnight over a cold 
typewriter, with the composing 
room foreman standing by impa- 
tiently." 

But then. Rosenbaum fans can 
rest assured, the sharp brown eyes 
will light upon a small gray note 
scratched upon folded copypaper, 
or the phone will jangle with a 
message that strikes a responsive 
chord. 

And the ne.xt day thousands of 
News Call-Bulletin readers will 
turn to Rosenbaum's coraer of the 
paper and smile, frown, laugh, sigh 
or spring into outraged action, 
whatever Jack intends they should 
do on that particular afternoon in 
San Francisco. 



iusterman Plumbing Co. 

24-Hour Service 

All Work Guaranteed 

454 - 14th STREET 

JN 1-5556 Evenings LO 6-3366 



Golden State Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

2012 FILLMORE ST. 
FI 6-2191 



Bianclii & Co. 
Cunio Bakery 

Fresh Roasled Coffee 
23 Green St. EX 2-4969 

Geo. E. Chase & 
Associates 

Insurance Adjusters 
14 Sansome St. GA 1-1277 

OHN F. MORRISON 
Real Estate 

2026 MISSION STREET 
MA 1-6090 

EDDIE'S CAFE 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner 

Short Orders 

Eddie Barrre, Owner 

»20 Turk Street FI 6-5004 



RILEY'S SCHOOL 

School for P.B.X-Reccptionist 
Training for Hotel & Motel Service 

502 Flood BIdg., 870 Market St. 

GA 1-8112 



Race Radio & TV 

RCA Sales 3; Service 

707C SAN JOSE AVE. 

VA 6-1303 



Jurado Boarding Home 

For Ambulatory 3t Aged Guests 

911 McAllister st. 

WA 2-0335 



40th & Taraval 
Barber Shop 

Jim Tagner 

3004 TARAVAL STREET 

OV 1-3454 



ATOMIC AGE 

RUG ac UPHOLSTERY 

Cleaning - Installation - Sales 

339 Divisadero UN 3-0445 

Booker T. Holly Warren Jackson 



Joseph's Barber Shop 

Hair Styling 

Joseph Flores, Prop. 

573 Buckingham Way SE 1-9976 

Stonestown 



WAGNER HOTEL 

J. L. Jolly 
2791 ■ 16th STREET 

UN 3-9873 



WONG'S GROCERY 

Groceries- Beer - Wine 
Meat 

1135 - 18th STREET 

ME 7-0137 



CAVALIER MOTEL 

TV - Beautyrest Mattresses 

throughout 

Singles - Doubles - Kitchenettes 

/. HEROLD. Mgr. 

2663 JUNIPERO SERRA BLVD. 

PL 5-9415 DALY CITY 



Frederick Meiswinkel, 
Inc. 

CONTRACTING 
PLASTERER 

2155 TURK STREET 

JU 7-7587 



BOB'S DONUT SHOP 

DONUTS 
APPLE TURNOVERS 



1621 POLK STREET 
GR 4-9667 



Frederick's Paint Shop 



Anna's Danish Cookie Co. 

3560 - 18th STREET 
UN 3-3882 



Sparkle Laundry - Cleaners 



PILSNER BAR 



MRS. CLARK 

Spiritualist-Medium-Clairvoyant 

Advice on all Affairs of Life 

946 Geary St. GR 4-0758 



LAFAYETTE PARK 
RESIDENCE CLUB 

1916 Octavia St. TU 5-0993 



Compliments 

of a 

FRIEND 



PHIL EGAN 

Watch SC Clock Repairing 
Valencia nr. 16th HE 1-8753 



Maurice Airport 
Salon De Coiffure 

At the Airport 
San Francisco JU 3-8830 



JICH- APRIL. 1961 



Bay Window 

(Continued from Page 3) 
example, J. Joseph Sullivan final- 
ly came out with his candidacy for 
City Attorney in a most challeng- 
ing manner. Flanked by Walter 
Haas and Roger Lapham. Jr., Sul- 
livan declared it's time for a 
change . . . With Dion Holm retir- 
ing at the end of his term i which 
is also the end of this year I there 
certainly will have to be a change. 
But with Utilities Counsel Tom 
O'Connor still not an officially de- 
clared candidate to succeed The 
Boss, that really makes Joe Sulli- 
van the only candidate in the 
arena . . . Tliis situation will be 
remedied in the near future, rest 
assuied, however, and the only 
sure thing about the City Attor- 
ney's office come November is that 
it will be won by an Irishman! 

The Board of Supervisors situ- 
ation is quite up in the air, to coin 
a phrase, what with the untimely 
death of James J. Sullivan, the 
resignation of Henry R. Rolph, the 
City Attorney candidacy of Joe 
Sullivan which, of course, means 
he'll not run for another supei-vis- 
orial term, the assumption in many 
ricles that Al Zirpoli and John Jay 
Ferdon will receive Bench appoint- 
ments ... all this adds up, as 
we've mentioned to a sky-high 
situation. 

Hienie Rolph, popular, soft-spo- 
ken, methodical, resigned because 
of the pressures of his booming ad- 
miralty law business; he noted, 
very fairly, that he wanted his re- 
placement to gain experience and 
to prepare for the election . . . 



And Mayor Christopher, acting 
swiftly in the unprecedented 
double vacancy occuring the same 
day. immediately appointed his 
longtime friend, Peter Tamaras, 



backed by the S. F. Volunteers 
who invariably come up with win- 
ners . , . Assuming that Joe Sul- 
livan will resign shortly, that will 
leave as the only veteran incum- 




PETER TAMARAS 
New Supervisor 

and, several days later. Lawyer Jo- 
seph E. Tinney . . . Both are criti- 
cism-proof appointments, Tamaris 
(the second Greek-American mem- 
ber in the Board's history; the 
first having been a dairyman name 
of Christopher I made as excellent 
a record on the Board of Permit 
Appeals as did Joe Tinney (not 
the first Irish-American in the 
Bard's history! on the City Plan- 
ning Commission, of which he had 
been President. 

Both Tamaras and Tinney, par- 
ticularly with the Incumbency 
edge, should retain their positions 
viate elective route this year; 
chances are they both will be 



MARK ROBERT SULLIVAN 

bent facing November's voters the 
good Bill Blake . . . Really, it's 
somewhat like chess or Chinese 
checkers, isn't it? 

To carry on, or — to put it an- 
other way — to complete the pic- 
ture, the Mayor then appointed 
onetime U. S. Mint Superintendent 
( before the days of the late Repub- 
lican regime, that is I George Gil- 
len to the Permit Appeals Board. 
Then he reached into the Pacific 
Union Club to claim as Tinney's 
replacement on the Planning Com- 
mission none other than the re- 
tired Board Chairman of the P T 
& T, Mark R. Sullivan. 



Now, let's see, where are we' 
Well, there are a number of per 
fectly good San Franciscans wh( 
arer umored to be interested in be 
ing a Supervisor . . . Jack Mor 
rison is riding on more than a ni 
mor. certainly; the former Chron 
icle 4th floor City Hall reporter re 
signed several months ago to con 
centrate on the job of making 1 
down to the 2nd floor where th 
supervisorial chambers are locate 
. . . Roger Boas has been men 
tioned. as have Albert E. Schlee 
inger, School Board Member J( 
seph A. Moore (whose wifi 
Gladys, is on the Rec-Park Con 
mission, and who is a cousin < 
Henry Rolph, but this isn't nepoj 
tism because they're all wonderful 
people), Public Utilities Commis- 
sioner Thomas P. White (one ot 
the best "labor" members the PUC 
has ever had) and 30 or 90 others 
who will be mentioned in the po- 
litical savvy columns from now or 
in . . . As an exclusive belonging 
entiiely to Bay Window, hov\'e\-er, 
we would like to share with you 
the information that Benny Bu- 
fano is not — repeat: NOT — inter- 
ested. All Benny wants is to be Icfl 
alone in Rube Owens' North Beach 
Sweage Treatment Plant to chisel 
and chisel and chisel. 



Arnold's Appliance 
Service 

Installation - Delivery Service 

All Major Home Appliances 

632 Persia St. JU 6-6 IOC 



FALLON, HARGREAVES AND BIXBY 

559 Washington Street 

San Francisco 11, Calif. 

Telephone SUtter 1-2338 

Cable Address: FALHAR 



AVE MOTRONI 
and Associates 

Windotv Displfiys 
617 Market Street GArfield 1-3676 



SHEEDY DRAYAGE CO. 

SHEEDY TRANSPORTATION CO. 

Crane, Rigging and Lift Service up to 40 Tons 
Machinery and Equipment Hauling 

1215 MICHIGAN STREET 

Near 3rd and Mariposa Streets, San Francisco 

W. A. STATTON, President 

Tel. Mission 8-7171 Home: PLaia 6-9117 



We Give S8CH Green Stamps 



Pickup and Delivt 



McCOTS SERVICE 

7th AVE. & LINCOLN WAY 

San Francisco 

For Ser\ ice Phone LO 4-5176 

W. HARRY JOHNS 

Licensed Brokerage - School of Real Estate 

For those inexperienced in Buying Real Estate 

415 Gough Street - UN. 3-6692 



THE RECOR] 




.YOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 



Gary's Auto Service 

curing - AAA Auto Assn. Service 

General Auto Repairs 

3475 CHAMPION ST. 

E 6-2165 Oakland, Calif. 

Sorlh Beach French- 
Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



Jn;p«r r-?020 



MACHINE SHOP 



Bill Nutter's Garage 

Specialists on Wheel Alignment 

Brakes and Motor Tunc-up 

BILL BARCA 

515 VISIT ACION AVE. 

Itar Biiyshorc Blvd. San Francisco 24 

Belfast Beverages 

640 VALENCIA STREET 
San Francisco 



jvic Center Stationery 

Complete Line of Stationery 

468 McAllister street 

Across froin the City Hall 
MArket 1-8041 



ictoria Pastry Co., Inc. 

Italian & French Paitries 

and Confections 

Cakes for All Occasions 

1362 STOCKTON STREET 

SU 1-2015 



TADICH GRILL 

SU. 1-9754 
545 CLAY STREET 



Mabel Minton 
Guest House 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9253 



S. F. Will Not Join 
Bay Area Association 

Sun Fruncisio's decision to stay 
nut of the newly-formed Associa- 
tion of Bay Area Governments ha.s 
I aused disappointment in some 
ciuarlers but it was based on sound 
leasons. 

As Mayor Christopher said, San 
Fiancisco has long advocated the 
closest cooperation among Bay 
Area communities and it continues 
to do so. 

In the Association, however, San 
Francisco would pay about 25 per 
cent of the cost and have only two 
votes out of 93. Moreover, the As- 
sociation does not plan to hold 
many meetings for discussion of 
the area's many pressing problems 
- only two general membership 
meetings a year plus four meetings 
a year of its board of directors, 
although operating on a substan- 
tial budget. 

"I suggested that ABAG could 
have been set up on a very mini- 
mum scale, that could bring u.s 
together either monthly or at regu- 
lar periods for a discussion of our 
problems," declared the Mayor. 
"Had we established a 'get-to- 
gether' organization with mini- 
mum costs on an e.xpeiimental 
basis, we could thereafter deter- 
mine the effectiveness of our work 
and organize accordingly at that 
time. 

"However, the desire to set up 
immediately an executive secre- 
tary, personnel, stenographers, 
traveling expenses, etc., is but a 
forerunner of the higher budgets" 
of an organization in whose ad- 
ministration San Francisco would 
have only a "minute voice" but a 
big share of the bill. 

Mayor Christopher proposes that 
ABAC'S general membership hold 
its meetings in San Francisco's 
City Hall, at no cost, with San 
Francisco an interested observer, 
to discuss their problems at no 
cost and, after a reasonable period, 
decide on a future course of action. 

It seems like a reasonable, ine.x- 
pensive way to get ahead with a 
program of desirable Bay Area co- 
operation. 



THE VILLA 



Established 1923 

Fully Equipped to render 
Hospital Care 

JOSF.PH SARTO, Prup. 

130 VALE STREET 

PL 5-0411 Daly City 



G. W. THOMAS DRAYAGE AND RIGGING CO., INC. 

GENERAL DRAYING - FREIGHT FORWARDING 




114- 1 4th STREET 

HEmlock 1-9624 

Sail Francisco 



Steel for All Purposes 

815 Bryant St. al 6th MArket 1-3063 

San Francisco 3, California 

SCULLY DRUG CO. 

Owl Rexal Drugs - Franchisee! Dealer 

156 GEARY STREET 
SUtter 1-3090 San Francisco 8, California 

1770 Fulton Street - 948 Market Street - 2598 Mission Street 

California Water & Telephone Co. 

300 MONTGOMERY STREET 
GA. 1-4826 San Francisco 

Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Est:iblishcd 1S94 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 

E.\ecutive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, Calif. 

NEW METHOD 

laundry and Dry Cleaners 

407 SANCHEZ STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 
MArket 1-0545 



RCH- APRIL, 1961 



PUBLIC LIBRARY S.F. 

E.J. Clarke, Librarian 

Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, Calif. 

47 X_l/59 (27 subs) (2980) 3627 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 




OFFICES ■ CANDLESTICK PARK • SAN FRANCISCO 
JUNIPER 6-eOOO ■ CABLE ADDRESS "GIAr-JTS" 



To the Baseball Fans of Son Francisco: 

I deeply appreciate the warm welcome that has been extended to me 
by the press and the baseball fans of San Francisco. I feel I am among 
friends and that is pleasant to contemplate since I am cast in a new role 
this year, as Manager of the Giants, and have new responsibilities. The 
support and good will of the fans will lighten my tasks, I am sure, and 
serve as a constant inspiration. 

I am happy, of course, to be back with the Giants. I was an active 
player with them through the better part of my Major League career 
and thoroughly enjoyed the association. The Giants are a great name 
in ba.seball ond have rich traditions. Our aim and purpose is to main- 
tain these standards in San Francisco. 

it is not our intention to venture predictions at this time regarding the 
Giants' fortunes in 1961, since we are not yet thoroughly familiar with 
the team's personnel, hiowever, our observations in the recent past 
convinces us the Giants ore a solid ball club and we are confident its 
play will please the fans of San Francisco. 

Sincerely, 

ALVIN DARK 



PUBLIC LIBRMr^Y 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 



FRANCIS L. McCARTY 

A PROFILE 



BAY WINDOW 



AROUND & ABOUT 

WHIT HENRY 



ART CLASSES — 
DE YOUNG MUSEUM 






SUPERIOR COURT JUDGE FRANCIS L McCARTY 




JUNE -JULY. 1961 



^ 



$8,000,000 JET-AGE PROJECT GETS UNDERWAY 
WITH EXCAVATION AND PILE DRIVING 



Construction of San Fiancisco 
International Airport's new $8,000,- 
000 South Terminal Building got 
undei- way Monday. June 26. as 
excavation equipment was moved 
into place and the first of more 
than 680 pilings were driven an 
average of 100 feet to bedrock be- 
low the filled land. The new ter- 
minal facility, designed by Welton 
Becket and Associates, architects 
and engineers, is the first phase of 
the unique "wrap-around" master 
plan for the airport's jet-age de- 
velopment. 

The master plan, completed by 
the Becket firm in 1959. calls for 
this new South Terminal (comple- 
tion by 1963 1 and a similar north 
terminal building (completion by 
1970). 

These two new terminal build- 
ings will then round out the ter- 
minal complex to three buildings. 



including the existing terminal 
building. 

The new South Terminal build- 
ing will house American Airlines. 
TWA. Pan American, Japan Air- 
lines. BOAC. Qantas. and Lufth- 
ansa, while United Air Lines. West- 
ern. National PSA. Pacific and 
West Coast Airlines will remain 
m the existing terminal building. 

The passenger who boards his 
plane at the new South Terminal 
will do so entirely thiough tele- 
scoping loading bridges, thus walk- 
ing from the upper level of the 
terminal directly to the aircraft 
without going outside. 

All passenger waiting areas are 
in the piers themselves while th^^ 
main body of the new terminal will 
house public lounges, restaurants, 
cocktail lounges, baggage - claim 
lobbies with the latest in baggage- 
handling equipment, airline offices, 
newsstands and other concessions. 



LAFAYEnE Italian-French Pastry 

CAKES FOR ALL OCCASIONS MADE TO ORDER 

Henry Arri(;(itti 

2184 UNION STREET Phone WEst 1-7655 San Francisco 23 



ANCHOR 
REALTY 




Loans • Rentals - Insurance 

2122 MARKET STREET 

MArket 1-2700 San Francisco 14, Calif. 




Electronic surveying 

Iielps keep PG&E service 

your best bargain 

To map the route of the 1400-mile Alberta-California pipeline 
which will bring Canadian natural gas to PG&E customers, sur- 
veyors used electronic measurement. It works day or night, in 
rain or fog, and can measure long distances. Electronics meant 
a faster, more economical survey on the S300 million pipeline 
in Pacific Gas and Electric Company's continuing program 
of building ahead for California — a state-on-the-grow. ^Si 

CREATIVE ENGINEERING • PIONEERING RESEARCH ° PROGRESSIVE PLANNING 
P e t r i n i Plaza 

Falletti and Baldocchi 



FINER FOODS 



phone Jordan 7-0976 



fulton and masonic 



THE RfcCOB 



PUBLIC m[i!\H\ 



JUL 2 1961 



bay ^vindlQAv 





TERY W EI.L, VERY WELL. So uc- here in the Citj' of the Sainted 
Fnincis — but don't call it "Frisro" — liaxc a "Modrl T" form of 
■ornment ! All, tlie slianic, tin- liorrihle, nntarnislird, iiak — (yoii'll 
■use tlie n>«' «ord, please) — ed sliamel 

Now comes the Bljtli-Zellerl)a<li report on municipal efficiency — 
Inefficiency ? — uith recommendations galore. The report would save 

taxpayers of the fabled, hill- 
ping, valley-loving, water — (al- 
st) circled city a cool $25,000,- 
-plus in a year, a frigid $45,- 
,000-plus in the ne.xt two years. 



Y S ■ 

MATTHEW C. CARBERRY 
Jut. fellow Citizen San Francis- 
is, do we really want to save all 
3 money ? Do we really want to 
away with the elective sport of 
ning via the polls Russ Wolden 
Assessor— or perhaps throwing 
good Russ out and finding a 




win with someone whose fingers 
might be slippery as Treasurer? 
Ah, Sir, you didn't even know we 
had a Treasurer! And the same ap- 
plies for the respected office of 
Public Defender but here we 
must admit with head bowed (over 
a double Beefeater or equivalent ) 
that the name of the incumbent 
official holding this admittedly im- 
portant office plumb eludes us. 

Now, Sir and, pardon, Madame, 
you \v,th thf pictty eyes, each Vvfith 



But if you're willing to pay — 
and pay and pay well, then, dear 
Sir et Madame down with the 
blithe Blyth - Zellerbach report! 
Let's keep the City of the Sainted 
Francis on the Sainted Status 
Quo! 

CROSSING THE "T's": Remem- 
ber when the "Big E" first burst 
upon the San Francisco scene, giv- 
ing a fantastically successful lift 
(Contimift'. on Page 14) 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

he Manazine of Good Goyertimeul 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $^.00 Per Year 

JUNE -JULY, 1961 

'OLUME :8 NUMBER II 



CHARLES A. ERTOL.A 

replacement in a Yank as authen- 
tic as the good Charles Ertola — or 
stop the beautiful campaign of the 
two lival Irishmen, Thos. O'Con- 
nor and J. Joseph Sullivan, for the 
valued office of City Attorney, or 
have the highly sensitive office of 
Sheriff appointive rather than 
elect, time and time again, the 
likes of Matt Carbcrry whose po- 
litical roots impregnably span both 
Irish and Italian poles? 

Do we really want to replace the 
elective likes of Honest John Good- 




JOHN J. GOODWIN 
Treasurer S. F. 

a charmingly different color, peep- 
ing over a copy of the City-County 
Record— if it's merely a tax-sav- 
ing procedure you're interested in, 
well, that's a different story line in- 
deed. 



Basketball - Baseball - Footb.ill - Golf - Softball - Track - Tennis 


Bowling - 


Uniforms • Trophies dC Rentals - S 


(i Rentals 


Flying 


Goose Sporting 

-GOOSE" GOSLAND 

1404 Taraval Street 


Goods 


MO 1-1909 


San Francisco 16 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




tven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranf^cr, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends; 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the backgrotind story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 



U-Drives, 




Charter Buses 
arailabtt 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



NEJULY. I<)61 



FRANCIS L. Mccarty 

Judge Superior Court 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



I tPERIOR COl'KT JITDGE FRANCIS LAWRENC E McCIARTY prominent radio commentator who 
' strode into his chambers one day last week, ob\ioiisly troubled by clucked that McCarty had over- 




^^^r "i^^ 



4m 

JUDGE FRANOS L. McCART-i 



"ptxt a aec(A cUfiut^ exfr&Uctice . . . 



a case of profound importance. 

His furrowed brow and pursed lips g:ave evidence of purposeful con- 
centration. He dropped his briefcase to the Boor with a hea\'y si}fh, 
then sip|)ed thoug:htfully at a cup of steaming coffee handed him by 

his bailiff, Gene Daley. 

At last, he spoke, "I can't un- 
derstand it." he said, unburdening 
himself. "Why aren't the Giants 
hitting?" 

Daley shiugged a sympathetic 
.shrug and disappeared into the 
courtroom. 

McCarty, a man of medium build 
to go with middle years, close- 
cropped hair, a brush mustache 
and soft voice, has a richly earned 
reputation for plying his mind with 
more significant matters than 
what's wrong or what's right at 
Candlestick Park. 

Still, it cannot be denied that he 
is a baseball nut, a facet of his 
character that is as unredeemable 
as his zest for a good scrap, even 
when the scrap is potentially po- 
litical suicide. 

Take the epic cable car contro- 
versy of 1954 when McCarthy was 
a member of the Board of Super- 
visors. He had the audacity to pro- 
pose a charter amendment that 
would eliminate two cable car 
lines that weren't doing much busi- 
ness. 

He promptly was besieged by 
the vociferous citizens committee 
to Save the Cable Cars. 

McCarty calmly observed that 
his amendment also would freeze 
into the charter two beloved cable 
car lines not then protected by the 
charter. 

This assuaged the riled ladies of 
the Save the Cable Cars commit- 
tee not one whit, but it did draw 
fire upon McCarty from anothei- 
direction. Strict economists who 
had silently applauded his proposal 
now turned on the supei-visor, 
branding him a rank sentamental- 
ist." 



As for the beleaguered McCarty, 
he stuck to his guns, defending the 
logic of his stand from both the 
viewpoint of tradition and dollars- 
and-cents. 

This was totally wasted upon a 



stepped himself this time, daring 
to tilt with cable cars, and that 
never again could he be elected so 
much as dog catcher. 

Other cynics chortled that the 
fur-clad ladies of the Save the 
Cable Car forces would chase Mr. 
McCarty right into the Bay. 

McCarty himself laughed all the 
way to the polls. The tumult had 
barely subsided when another elec- 
tion had rolled around and the vot- 
ers had their say. McCarty led the 
ticket by his biggest majority 
e\er. And as supervisor — not dog 
catcher. 

McCarty was born at 16th and 
Bryant Streets some 53 yeai'S ago, 
the son of a San Francisco police- 
man. This address later inspired 
one of his campaign managers in 
an overzealous moment to claim 
McCarty was bom in Seals Stadi- 




Located at 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



um, possibly during a twi-nij 
doubleheader. Actually, McCai 
concedes, with a broad grin, 
was born in a frame buildi 
across the street, a good 300 yai 
from centerfleld. 

The South-of-Market product i 
tended Lowell High School, S 
Mateo Junior College, the Univi 
sity of California and Hastin 
College of Law. 

Admitted to the bar in 1933, 
soon was acting the part ol 
struggling attorney, which, at $ 
a month, lequired no acting t 
lots of struggling. 

He found his niche in labor li 
and had developed a thriving pn 
tice when Mayor Elmer Robins 
tapped him for the Board of S 
pervisors in 19,52. The McCarty c 
reer since has been a matter 
public record, supported by an ; 
most unceasing staccato of pub 
applause. 

As a supervisor, he spearhead 
numerous civic projects, includi 
the Storyland playground for ch 
dren. Storyland, he confesses, w 
inspired by his daughter. Shan 
She was four years old when W 
Carty was a fledgling supervia 
She was forever begging her fat 
er to take her to Fairyland in Oa 
land. McCarty grew weaiy of t 
many trips across the bay. a 
after one tiring junket asked hii 



4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 



Around and About 



By WHIT HENKY 

'OMK VKAKS A(JO in this (•oliinin. n« lln- rcqiK'Nt of a niimhcr of 

IMMipli-, I ran the i>\<'r popular 'Tasfv At The Bat," a l)lt of verso 

lat I lia\e had tlie plt-asiirc of rc<-itiiiK on niimrroiis ocriusionN. There 

ive also been times when I have 

len followed by one of San Fran- 

sco's most favored and gifted 

ns. Jim Leary. with his inimit- 

ile "The Man Who StrvicU 0\it 

isey." 

at I give it to yon 



I then sent in my next one in my 

own peculiar style, 
And Casey swung with all his 

might and he missed it by a mile. 
with his permission ^ow, no matter what the poetry 

says about Casey and his bat, 
That's the way it happened and 

you can bet your life on that. 




THE MAN \\ HO STKITCK 
OUT CASEY 

By Jim Leary 

lere's been a lot of smoking 
about Casey and his bat, 
id how he didn't win the game 
and a lot of stuff like that. 
;s, they wrote a lot of ihymes 
about him, iuit to swell his fame, 
it what's the use of puffing up 
a gu>' who lost the game? 

1, I heard a lot about him and 
the way he smashed them out, 
id I'd heard about his posing just 
to make the bleachers shout, 
I when we met with Casey's 
team, you bet your life I tried 
I put a kink in Casey's fame and 
to puncture Ciisey's pride. 

)W those of you who saw the 
game, it's easy to recall 
lat we'd have lost and they'd 
have won IF Casey hit the ball, 
was in the ninth, two on— two 
out, when Casey came to bat, 
id Lordy how the bleachers 
cheered when on his hand-; he 
spat. 

ell, I wound up and then unltink- 
ed and let the horsehide fly. 
Id Casey didn't do a thing but 
watch the ball go by. 
Itrike one." the umpire shouted. 
and I thought there'd be a fight. 
it Casey turned around and said, 
"Be quiet, boys, he's right." 

len I shot in my number two and 
it whizzed across the plate; 
ell, if Casey thought he'd hit at 
it, he thought a bit too late. 
Itrike two," the umpire bellowed, 
and the bleachers didn't shout. 
id I took a look at Casey and his 
smile was wearing out. 



Oh, somewhere the band is play- 
ing, but it's not in Casey's town; 

They're celebrating Riley, he's the 
guy that put him down. 

So it's skidoo for Casey — his num- 
ber's twenty-three, 

It's Riley, Pitcher Riley, that's the 
hero, and that's me. 

In my last column I told about 
the Society for the Preservation 
and Encouragement of Barber 
Shop Quartet Singing in America 
and how it came into being. There 
have been a number of requests 
about the organization, particular- 
ly about the local chapter. It meets 
every Wednesday evening at the 
Elks Club, 345 Post Street. The 
President of the local chapter is 
Ken McElroy, an engineer em- 
ployed by the State of California. 
He assures me that anyone inter- 
ested will be more than welcome 
to attend a rehearsal and if they 
care to. can try out for member- 
ship. Next Fall the annual con- 
cert will be given in Nourse Audi- 
torium, Saturday evening, October 
28. Mark that date in your calen- 
dar now; the finest barber shop 
quartets in the Far West will ap- 
pear on that auspicious occasion. 

All children under the ago of 90, 
(Continued on Page 151 



Black & White Garage 

Public P.irking Si Stora-e 
Mnintcm.ice SC Lubricntion 



955 POST STREET 
PR 5-96''0 



George L. Avery 

Mt'ni:ipal Equipment and Supplies 
4518 KOLLIS STREET 

Oakland 8, California 
Olympic 4-5254 



William O. (Bill) 

DUFFY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
TAX CONSULTANT 



2888 MISSION ST, 



AT. 2-4151 



Carlson Termite Control 

PROTECT YOUR HOME — YOUR PROPERTY 

CALL ON US FOR PROMPT CON,SLILTATION 

HONEST ESTIMATES 

Licensed by State of California 



1331 Nineteenth Avenue 



LO 4-3030 



FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP 

BERT WEIBLE — District Manager 

2141 Lombard St. JO 71860 




CLARENCE X. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



Fruitvale Chapel 
1580 FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIlog 3-4114 



Elmhurat Chapel 
8901 E. 14th STREET 

NEptune 2-43'13 



JNE-JULY. 1961 



emil oelliiii 

Italian Marble Co. — Importers 

530 McAllister St UNcJerhiU 3-8620 

TABLES FROM $29X0 

ANDERSON k PERKINS, Inc. 

SPEC AllZED COLLECTION SERVICE 

Licensed and Bonded — Bunded Ci)rresp(indents <it All Points 

Wliolesule - Retail ■ Pro/essioKdl DepanmeiiU 

3 1 Geary St. San Francisco 8 EXbrook 2-8466 

THE LOWRIE PAVING CO., INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Grading - Pav!ng - Underground Construcli^n 

Mnin Office and Yard 

174 SAN BRUNO ROAD — SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

PLaza 5-8484 JUno 3-3574 

San Francisco Yard— 2170 Oakdale Ave., San Francisco 24— MI 7-6000 

R. J. KILROY. Supjrintend m 

MEL-WllllAMS COMPANY 

CANNED AND FROZEN FOOD PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers' Agentj — Canners' Representatives 



15 California Street 
Telephone: EXbrook 2-7366 



S^n Francisco II, California 
Cable Address: ME'.CO 



E. MARTINONI CO. 

WHOLESALERS and RECTIFIERS of DISTILLED SPIRITS 

"Established 1874" 



70 BERRY STREET 



San Francisco, California 



Phone EXbrook 7-2760 



All San Francisco Fire Department drivers, pump operators a] 
tillemion arc required lo pass a Driver Aptitude Test conducted 
tlie Division of Training. This test evaluates the applicants' ref! 
reaction, visual acuity, depth perception, side vision and night visio 
Completion of this test qualifies the applicant to participate in 
seven-day course covering driving, tiller and pump operation i 
struction. A final « rittcn examination is given. 



PHOTO CAPTIONS Page 7 (Left to Right) 

Director of Training, Asst. Chief Henry Lindecker and Ca| 
Alexander Potter observe Firemen Don Favorita and William H 
operate visual acuity and distance judgement machines. 

Photo upper right. Instruction on Driver and Tillerman tec 
nique at Drill Yard. 

Lt. Robert Bourke and Fireman Ed Cooper on Aerial 1 ru 
Tractor. 

Chief of Dept. William Murray and Capt. Ernest Banchero i 
spect Brake Reaction Detonator on Dept. Ford. 

Capt. Potter (inset photo) instructs Fireman Don Favorita 
the Reactometer. j 

In photo lower left, Lt. James Rustice explains Tillerman Tec 
nique to Fireman Jack Rial. 

Photo lower right shows Firemen Tom Knudsen and Ru 
Marino being instructed on both old and new fire engines. 
(All photos by CHET BORN, San Francisco Fre Department Photographe 



Amiens Liquors 



1825 IRVING STREET 



JOHN MULLIN and JOHN COSS 



FINE WINES and SPIRITS 
GLASSWARE - ICE CUBES 



Phone SE 1-6361 



Delivery Service. 




INEJULY. 1961 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Hnll MA 1 

George Chiistophcr. Mayor 

Joseph J. Allen. Kxeoutive Secretary 
Mark r^. Gerstle III. Confidential Secretary 
MarKaret Smith. Personal Secretary 
.Tohn T,. Mootz. Administrative Assistant 
.Tohn P. Sullivan. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS. BOARD OF 

i?.r, Pitv Hall HE 1 

Me.ts Mciiday at 2 P.M. 
r>r, rii.nrl.>j A Krtola. President. 



M-illi 



im C-. Illaiio. on Folsom St. 
h II. Casev. 2r)2S Ocean Ave. 
Ill S, Dtil.l.s. nsi California St. 
J. Ferdnn. I.'IB MontKOmery St. 
s T,. ITallev. S7n Market St. 
isa. Shortall McMahon. 70.1 Market St. 
•|':nnar-is. SB San Rafael Way 



' Mis.« 

.1. .In.^eph Rnllivan 111 Sntter St. 
.Mfonso .1. Zirpoli. 300 Montgomery St. 

Roliert .T. rinlan. Clerk 

T.illian M. Renter. Chief Assistant Clerk 
Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — James J 

Sullivan. Blake. McMahon 
County. State and National Affairs — Perdon, Casey, 

Halley 
Education. Parks and Recreation — Rolph, Blake, J 

Joseph Sullivan 
Finance, Revenue and Taxation — Halley, Ferdon 

Zirpoli 
Judiciary, Legislative and Civil Service — Dobbs 

Casey, Rolph 
Police — Casey, Dobbs. .Tames J. Sullivan 
Public Buildings. Lands and City Planning — J 

Joseph Sullivan, Dobbs, James J. Sullivan 
Public Health & Welfare— Zirpoli. Hallev. McMahon 
Public Utilities— McMahon, Ferdon. Zin 
Streets and Highways — Blake. Rolph, J. Joseph 

Sullivan 
Rules— Ertola, Dobbs, Halley 

ASSESSOR 

101 Citv Hall 
Russ.ll L. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

20f, City Hall 
Dion R. Hohn 

DISTRICT ATTORlilEY 

617 Montgomery St. 
Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

7IIII Montgomery St. 
I'^dw'.H-fl T. Mancuso 
SHERIFF 

:'..-il City Hall 
Matthew C. Carberry 
TREASURER 

llu city Hall 
John J, (Joodwin 



KL 



MUli 



EX 7-050( 
EX 2-153^ 
HE 1-212- 
HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 
Fourth Floor, City Hall 

H, A. VanDerZee. Presiding 

Raymond J. Arata 

Carl H. Allen 

Byron Arnold 

Walter Carpeneti 

C. Harold Caulfield 

Melvyn I. Cronin 

Preston Devlne 

Norman Elkington 

Timothy I. Fitzpatrit'k 

Josei)h Karesh 

Joseph M. Cummins. Sec 
ISO City Hall 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hail 
.lohn W. Hussey. Pnsiding 
Albert A. Axelrod 
rt J. Dr 



Andr 



■ J. Eyn 



Clayton W. Horn 

Leland J. Lazarus 

Ivan L. Slavicl 

301 City Hall 



UN l-So5l 
Gerald S. Levin 
I'lancis McCarty 
John B. Molinari 
Edward Molkenbuhr 
Clarence W. Morris 
Harry J. Neubarth 
Edward P. O'Day 
Charles S. Peery 
George W. Schonfeld 
William P. Traverso 
Alvin E. Weinberger 
etary 

UN 1-8552 



KL 2-3008 
Clarence Linn 
William O'Brien 
Haymond O'Connc 
Lenore D. Underwood 
James J. Welsh 
George E. Maloney 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

MARCH, mill 

TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

164 City Hall KL 2-30 

.lames M. Cannon, Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN I-S5 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
Daniel J. Collins. Foreinan 
Sydney W. Hopkins. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan, Consulting Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St. YU 6-29 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Offic 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vauehan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser. 6R1 Market St. 
Rt Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 309 Fremont St, 
William Moskowitz. 1901 California Street 
Robert A. Peabodv. 4B6 Post St. 
Adolnh L. Pierotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto, 526 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-57 

Thomas F. Strycula. 

Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 

JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Bueil, Chairman. 445 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - :i2nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger, 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
Rev. James B. Plynn, 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Bosweil. 1975 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl. 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2,S9 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean, 

940 - 25th St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Clearv 
Hotel Senator. Sacrament... during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin HI 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President. 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley. M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Neil Sinton, 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagopian, Mills Tower 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson, 2835 Vallejo SL 

William E. Knuth, S. F. State College 

Joseph Bsherick, 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L.. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 



■Offi( 



Me 



A C. McChesney, Jury Commlssione 



KL 2-300,^ 



Mayor 

President. California Palace Legion of Hono 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President. Public Library Commission 
President. Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. Ill: 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 

Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. 
James S. Kearney. 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Mein, 315 Montgomery St. 
Mr.s. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller. Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall HE 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Wm. Kilpatrick. President. 827 Hyde St. 
Richard C. Ham, 200 Bush St. 
Hubert J. Sober. 155 Montgomery St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 
DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. Hi: 



Al.- 



X. McCausla 



i at 7:30 P.M., 



EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue 
Jleets l.st and 3rd Tuesd 
170 Fell St. 

Mrs. Claire Matzger. President. 3550 Jackson 

M-s. Lawrence Draper. Jr., 10 Walnut St. 

Adolfo de Urioste. 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Edward Kemmitt G01 Polk St. 

Samuel Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 

Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 351 California St. 

Elmer F. Skinner. 220 FeU St. 

Dr. Harold Spears. Supt. of Schools iin. 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall 1> 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

P.ert Simon. President, 1350 Folsom St. 
Dr. Peter Angel. 1S67 - 15th Ave. 
Philin Dindia. 536 Bryant St. 

William F. Murray, Chief of Department 

Carl F. Kruger. Deputy Chief 

Wm. P. Lindecker. Asst. Chief. Adm. 

Wm. H. Gilmore, As.st. Chief. Spec. Servi. 

Henry A. Lindecker. Asst. Chief, Dlv. Tr: 

Albert E. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 
Prevention ^ Investigation 

Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

61 Grove St. HI' 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook. President, 220 Montgom. i 
George W. Cuniffe, 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell, M.D., 977 Valencia St. 
Frank J. Collins. 2614 - 16th Ave. 
Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St, 

Robert E. Hunt, Acting Executive Dir.- 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

410 Turk St. UK 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jefferson A. Beaver, Chairman, 2400 Sutter si 
Al F. Mailioux, 200 Guerrero St. 
Charles R. Greenstone, 2 Geary St. 
Charles J. Jung. 622 Washington St. 
Jacob Shemano. 988 Market St. 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

.we Golden Gate Ave. Pi; 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 
John E. Sullivan, Chairman. 69 West Port:. I 
Jay E. Jellick. 564 Market St. 
Donald Magnin, 77 O'Farrell St. 
G. Baltzer Peterson. 116 New JloiUgomery f 
David Thom.son. 65 BeiTy St. 

Vining T. Fisher. General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole. Secretary 



THE RECOB 



■RMIT APPEALS. BOARD OF 
227 City Hall 



Miots 



ly Widiiosdn 



:(ill r.M. 
9S4 Kols 



Milam H, H. Pavls, Pr.-sld 
Max Moi>r.\ r.ilS Potrero Ave. 
orK>' lilllln. 10111 - 19th Avo. 
irence J. Walsh. 2450 - 17th St. 
npst Ti. West. 2e.^ MontKnnury St. 
J. Edwin Mattox. Secretary 

ILICE COMMISSION 
Hall of Justice SU 1-21 

Me.t.s every Monday at 5:00 I'.M. 

irold K. McKlnnon. President. 25;". CallfDrnla S 
ul A. UlsslnKer. P.O. Box 2442 
omas J. Mellon, 390 First St. 

Thoma.s CahMI. Chief of Police 
Alfred J. Nelder. Deputy Olilef of Police 
I. Thomas Zampoza. Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel McKlem. Chief of Inspectors 
lit. Wm. J. O'Brien, Cmnml.'islon Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler, Department Secretary 



IBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 
Civic Center 
Meets 1st Tuesday 



HE 1-2121 
nnth at 4 P.M. 



U-p Vavurls. President. H'.iii C.eary St. 

in M. Bransten. (103 - :!rd St. 
Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 

se M. Kanuechl. 144.'i Stockton St. 

irKaret Cirdner. l.fen Iximliard St. 

Iln F5. Ciurlch. 300 MontKomery St. 

V. William Turner, 1642 Broderlck St. 

■s. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 

Iton K. I.,epetich. 16,5,'; Polk Street 

ttert E. Schwabacher, Jr., 100 Montgcjinery 

omas W. S. Wu, D.D.S.. 1111 Stockton St. 
William R. Hi.lman. Librarian 
Frank A Clarvoe. Jr.. Secretary 



IBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 
287 City Hall Ht 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

n Fazackerley. President. 851 Howard St. 

lart N. Greenberg, 765 Folsom St. 

orge F. Hanson. 215 Market St. 

nry W. Roden. 1999 Broadway 

omas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 
Robert C. Kirkwood, Manager of Utilitii 



James J. Finn. Secretary to Comn 
Bureaus and Departn 
counts, 2S7 City Hall 

George Neeri, Director 
-port. San Francisco Internatior 



IMf.ird Urowi 
tch Hetchy, 4J5 
Oral 1.. iloorc 
Manager 



6-0500 
5-7000 



nlclpal Railvi/ay, 949 Presidii 
Vernon \V. Anderson, Gen. 



.ve. Fl 

1 Manager 
rsonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
b.ic Service, 2S7 City Hall HE 

William J. Simons, Director 
Iter Department, 425 Mason St. PR 

James H. Turner, General Manager 

BLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
585 Bush St. EX : 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays each month 
at 9 A.M. 

;holas A. Uoumos, President, 220 Montgume 
3. John J. Murray, 1306 Portola Drive 
lllam P. Scott, Jr.. 249 Xatoma St. 
•queline Smith. 2015 Steiner St. 
»nk H. Sloss. 351 California St. 

Ronald H. Born. Director of Public Welfar 

Mrs. Kulala Smith. Secretary 

CREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLiiren LAidge, Golden Gale Park .SK 1 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 



6-56.10 
1-2121 
5-7000 



liter A. Haas, Sr., 98 Battery St., Presid 

ter Bercut. 1 Lombard St. 

,ry Margaret Casey, 532 Mission St. 

lllam M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

. Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

8. Joseph A. Moore, 2590 Green St. 

in F. Conway. Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. KImbell, General Managei 
Paul N. Moore, Secretary to Commlssic 



sion 



HE 1-2121 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 



Mcts eve 



«la' 



It 3:30 P.M. 
n. 465 California 



Kv.-rett Griffin, Chair 

James H. Black, Jr., 120 Monlgomerv St. 
James A. Folger. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
Lawrence R. Palaelos. 356 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

93 Grove Street 

Meets every Wednesday at 3 P.M. 
Willi, iiM T i;,,,l, President, 2161 - isth A 
I'liilMi :--' I ' iii'iii. 1 Sansome St. 
.1,11 MM, III. 120 Montgomery St. 

I ', I A 1 M. . , J251 - 36th Ave. 

.\l.iiuu I'. Uwiuiuth, 4109 Pacheco 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 



IIIO 1-2121 



Se 



etai 



WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA l-GCii 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Frederic Campagnoli President. 300 Montgi^imry 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Frank A Flynn, 1549 .Noriega St. 
Prentis C. Hale, Jr., 867 Market St. 
George T. Davis, 111 Sutter St. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson. 19 Maywnod Drive 
Wilson Meyer. 333 Montgomery St. 
Guido J. Musto, 536 North Point 
Samuel D. Sayad, 35 Aptns Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 

E. Lawrence George, Secretary 



HE 1-2040 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcaderr 
Raymond L, Bozzini, Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Ale 

Thos. P. Christian, Market Master 

CORONER 

650 Merchant St. 
Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue 
O. Townsend. Chief 
Doyle U Smith. Superintendent of Plant 

FINANCE £ RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk & Recorder HE 1-2121 

M.irtin J. Mongan, 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters 

Charles A. Rogers. 1G7 City Hall 
Tax Collector 

Louis Contl, 107 City Hall 
Records Center 

Lk J. LieOuennec, 160 Otis 

HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEmlock 1-2121, Ext. 704 
Lloyd Conrich, 45 - 2nd Street 
li-dward Dullea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnin, Stockton & O'Farrell 
Frank E. Oman, 557 - 4th St. 
Terence J. O'Sullivan, 200 Guerrero St. 

Bernard A. Cummings, Secretary, 254 City Hall 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox, Director of I'ubllc Health 

Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns. Asst. Director Public Health lor 

Hospital Services 
ssler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 71h Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 



HE 1-2121 



HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



Louis A. .Moiaii, Sup. 
San Francisco General Ho 



lis A, .Moiali, 

ancisco Gene 

r. E Alber,s. 

cy Hospital 

rl Llak. 



Karl l;lak.-, Adm, Sup.riiilendent 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall 
Reuben H. Owens, Director 
Brooks Larter, 

A.sslstant Director. Administrative 
J. Archer, 
Asst. Director. Maintenance and Ope 



Bureaus 

Accounts. 260 City Hall 

.1, .1. MctMoskey. Supervisor 
Architecture 26.'-. citv Hall 

Cliarl.s W, Griffith. City Architect 
Bui'ding Inspection, 276 CItv Hall 

l:nbert I V l,..vy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2:i23 Arniv 

A If, Kk.-nberg. Superintendent 
Centr.Tl Permit Bureau, 286 City Hall 

Sidney Franklin. SupervLsor 
Egipeerina. 359 ritv Hall 

r'llfr,„-d J, ( rtz, City Engineer 

Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 



Wi 



n, .lo 



Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. 

Bernard M. f.'rotty. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. 

F. n. Brown. Superintendent 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 

Ben Benas, Purcha.ser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway. Chief A.sslstant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, SOO Quint 

A. M. Flaiiert.v. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harris 

J. E. Leary. Supervisor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 60 

George Stanley, Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

93 Grove St. 
Philip T>. Rezos. Director of Property 
James T. Graham. Audili.riuiii Mgr, 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS i MEASURES 

6 City Hall 
O. C. Skinner, Jr, 



HE 1- 

HE 1- 

HE 1- 

HE 1- 

HE 1- 

HE 1- 

Army i 
HE 1- 
HB 1- 



2121 
2121 
2121 
2121 
2121 
2121 



HE 1-2121 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 



Board of Trustees 
.Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President, 

2 Pine St. 
Walter E. Buck. President, 235 Montgomery SI 
K. Raymond Armsby. Ill Sutter St. 
Louis A- Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 
Ms c T.ihin Clark, House on Hill. San Matei 
\b\-inder de Brettevllle, 2000 Washington St. 
Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 
.Mrs. tiruce Kelhain, 15 Arguello Blvd. 
..'harles .Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 
William W. Mein, 315 Montgomery St. 
David Pleydell-Bouverie, Glen Ellen, Calif. 
fohn N, Kosekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 
Williani R. Wallace. Jr.. 100 Bush St. 
Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerhach. 1 Bush St. 



tx-Offii 



Me 



ibers 



President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe, Jr., Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas, Secretary 

M, H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

.Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. .\pril. June. Oct., 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron. Honorary President. 
Hillsborough 

Richard Rheem Temporary DIr.. 1659 Russ Bldg. 

.Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Miss Louise A. Boyd, 210 Post St. 

Sheldon O. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

Charles de Young Thieriot, 1.SII2 Florlbunda, Hills- 
b'^rou"h 

R. Gwin Follis. 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Helmbucher. 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garret McBnerney. II. 3725 Washington St. 

Roscoe F. Oakes, 2006 Washington St. 

Joseph O. Tobin. 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker, Burllngame Country Club 

Charles Page, 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Plloll San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcio Members 

.Mayor 

I'r.-sident, Recreation & Park Commission 
Dr. Walter Heil. Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalpine. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

436 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. MA 1-1700 

Charles W. Frledrichs. Secretary and Manager 



NE-JULY, 1961 



COLAN HEATING & SHEET METAL CO. 

AIR CONDITIONING 

GUTTERS - DRAIN PIPE - CHIMNEYS - SKYLIGHTS 

GARBAGE CANS 



25 PATTERSON STREET 



Phone ATwater 2-2616 



George L. Burger 

Wholesale 
POTATOES and ONiONS 



52 Vallejo Street 



San Francisco 



Phone EX 2-1313 



CARAVAN LODGE 

Visit the Newly Decorated SABRE ROOM 
OCKTAIl LOUNGE - RESTAURANT 



601 Eddy Street 



San Francisco 



Phcne PH 6-1380 



CHIN & HENSOLT 

Consulting 
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

SCHOOL OF REAL ESTATE 

W. HARRY JOHNS, Licensed Brokerage 

For the inexperienced individual planning to buy Real Estate soon . . . 
For property owners seeking clearer understanding of their rights and 
duties . . . For experienced investors seeking additional property for 
increased income. 



415 Gough Street 



San Francisco 2 



Phone UN 3-6692 



COATES, HERFURTH & ENGLAND 

CONSULTING ACTUARIES 
Crocker Building — San Francisco 4 



TOPS INTERIOR DECORATING 

Modern Interiors — Custom Upholstering 

See MR. MAR'O 

2800 Bryant Street Mission 8-5/77 

Henry Irving Associates 

INSURANCE - ACCOUNTING 

1428 Irving St. Established 1924 OV. 1-2100 

NATHALIE -NICHOLI INC. 

Manufacturers of Dresses 

1663 MISSION ST. UNderhill 3-0650 



SEARS ROEBUCK EMPLOYEES' CAFETERIA 



Geary Blvd. at Masonic 



San Francisco, California 



Price's Convalescent Hospital 

331 Pennsylvania St. Phone Mission 7-3587 

Sen Francisco, California 

Automatic Merchandising Company 

The Finest in Cigarette Vending Machines and Automatic Music 

16 ROSE STREET Telephone: UNderhiil 1-9785 

San Francisco 2, California 

Phone YUkon 2-5686 

Hang Ah Tea Room 

1 HANG AH STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 8, CALIF. 

Hours: 1 1 A.M. to 3 P.M. CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 

HASTIE 

Real Estate Inspection and Repair, Inc. 

Complete Termite Inspection Reports 

Termites - Fungi - Beetles 

225 CAPITOL AVENUE 

San Francisco 12, Calif. DEIaware 3-3700 

HARRY H. HASTIE 



THE RECOf 



PI AN TO ENROI I 

tOYS.. GIRLS.. ADULTS 



4th Through 12th Grades 


All Courses Accredited 


rep for Entr.uuc Ex.uns 1.., Wcs 


oint. Annapolis. Air Force, Coast 


uard. Naval Reserve, Mar.time 


cademics and College Board. 



Englisli for Foreigners 

Laboratory Chemistry for Nurses 

Secretarial Courses 

Regular High School Coursc-i 

Accelerated (two ye;'rs in one) 

G.I. Courses 
Vivate Tutoring - Night and Day 

DREW SCHOOL 

2901 CALIFORNIA STREET 



ieorge Scharetg & Sons 

DRAYMAN 
04 ■ 22nd St. San Francisco 7 
hone: Mission 7-4932 

Anthony Oneto 
Automatic Laundry 

648 STANYAN STREET 
TUxedo 5-5543 



Low Rate Hauling 
Basement Cleaning 

941 BUCHANAN STREET 
V/Alnut 1-2775 



TOY FAIR 

Fait. Friendlv Service. 

Toys ■ Games - Greetin,q Cards 

Kc\s Made 

J. D. McCormicIc, Prop. 

108 - 24fh St. Ml 7-7934 



ROBERTA'S 

Dressmaking - Alterations 

24-7 SACRAMENTO ST. 

FI 6-4616 

Arnold's Appliance 
Service 

fnstal'.ition - Delivery Service 
All Major Home Appliances 

632 Persia St. JU 6-610C 



DeYoung Museum Plans 
Summer Art Classes 

An eight week series of siimmei 
art classes fo: adults entitled "E.x- 
erciscs in Abstraction" will be 




WALTER HEIL 
Director of De Young Museum 

given by Charles Lindstrom at the 
M. H. DeYoung: Memonal Museum 
beginning July 7 and 8. 

To avoid over-large classes the 
course of lectures, demonstration 
and practice will be presented four 
times. It will be given Friday 
morning, 10:15 to noon; Frlda.y 
afternoon, 1:30 to 3:30; Saturday 
morning, 10:15 to noon; and Satur- 
day afternoon, 1:30 to 3:30. 

Purpose of the course is to in- 
crease an appreciation for the ex- 
pressive, presentational qualities 
of all fine art and to suggest the 
infinitude of visual events which 
may serve as themes for painting. 
While the course is intended as a 
continuation of previous courses 
given b.v Mr. Lindstrom, "Exer- 
cises in Perception" and "Exercises 
in Oil Painting" it is open to all 
advanced students. Medium used 
will be oil. 

The opening sessions of the 
course July 7 and 8 will be devoted 
to slide - illustrated lectures to 
which the public is invited whether 
or not they wish to attend the 
practice classes that viill follow. 

Outlines for the course are 
available at the Museum's Infor- 
mation desk. The course is free 
of charge. 



WAGNER HOTEL 

J. L. Jolly 

2791 - lath STREET 

UN 3-9873 

WONG'S GROCERY 

Groceries - Beer - Wine 
Meat 

1135 - 18th STREET 



EAGLESON 
ENGINEERS 



615 Saiisome Street 

San Franciso 11, California 

MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

1745 FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 3, California 

UNderhiU 1-1455 

GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

Higgins Funeral Home and Ambulance Service 

''We Invite Your Confidence" 

1510 "A" STREET 



PL 7-454J 



ANTIOCH, CALIF. 



Cecilys Transmission Service 

Orerhaulcd — Exchanged — Repaired — Aulotnolire Service 

Cecil H. Doss 

No. 4 Joost Avenue - JU 6-7979 - San Francisco. Calif. 



SE-JULY. 1961 



Old Corner CAiib 

FRANK & RM.PH 

-Where Old Friends Meet" 

200 Copp Street MA. I-1432 



E & V Cafeteria 

ALWAYS GOOD COFFEE 

Sandu'iclies A Sficcialtv 

2340 Geary Street WA. 1-9801 



MARK STEVENS 

^.idl.tv Full and Poultry 

Wholssole — Retail 

Joe r:orottl ■ Poui Morchctti 

1145 Market Street UN. 3-1455 



H. WENIGER 

"ManiLfacturers of 

Instruments for Hand Sirgery 

Active Hand & Finger Splints 

70- 12th Street MA. 1-6876 



DO-NUT BOWL 



lOth Avenue & Geary Blvd. 
SKyline 1-6454 



Zoo Coffee Shop 

Across from the Zoo 

Hattie Nevius 

2898 Sloat Blvd. LO.4 65I0 



Mercury Pharmacy 

Prescription Specialises 

Robert J. Potterson 

1201 Church St. VA. 4-6607 



Jimmie's Liquors 

Roy Sutherlond. New Owner 

finest Wines • Liquors - Mixe, 

2229 Irving Street OV. 1-3051 



R & J 
SHEETMETAL CO. 

1286 Sanchez Street 
VAIoncIa 6-7330 



M & M FOODS 

Mary MoRLtv, Prop. 

300 CHENERY STREET 
JU. 5-9939 



J & J Plating Works 

FRANK & JOE JUKICH 

1420 HARRISON STREET 

MArket 1-3249 



INCDAHL'S 

Un/inislicd Furnitme 

G'iddeii Pamts 

670 Valencia Street Ml. 8-6643 



Tunnel Market 

Groceries - Fniils 
Vegetdbles 

174 W. Portal Ave. MO. 4-4700 



Wally''s Coffee Shop 

NEW OWNER ^Wallace R, Belnm 

Open 6 A.M. 
1665 Market SIroet KL. 2-2858 



WILLIAMS 
ALUMINUM 

24 GILBERT STREET 
UN. 3-4556 



K & K Liquor Store 

Imported and Domestic Liquors 

Cocktail Party Supplies 

James Walker & Gabriel Longo 

637 Larkin Street PR 6-5873 



RIVERA'S CAFE 

Abraham Rivero, Manoger-Ov.ngr 

Beer - Wine - Good Food 

Good Times 

3078 - 24th Street VA. 6-8670 



Croivn Pet Shop 

Complete L'ne of Pet Supplies 
and Pets 

ANN CASTOR, Monoger 

17 V/est Portal Ave. OV. 1-4177 



GEARY MOTORS 

Ford Sale.s and Scri.ice 

AL CrNNINClHAM 

4700 Geory BA. 1-2300 



Kotzbeck Galleries 

Fine Prints - Expert Framing 
Originals m Water Colors s Oils 
2031 Fillmore St. Fl 6-5620 



Brinks 
Incorporated 



Standard Garage 

PARKING • STORAGE 

Complete Automotive Service 
Lube Jobs 



Arlene''s Cleaners 

Personalised Service 

Gertrude Ward 

2017 Chestnut St. WA 2-1410 



The Package House 

FIXE WINES 
AND LIQUORS 



COURT ROOM 

Len and Jim Courtney 
501 Van Ness Ave. 
HE I-I0I4 San Fran 



Kling?r & Shaffer Co. 

CONFECTIONERY 

EOUIPMENT 

3'',2 FIFTH STR'ET 

YU 2-5697 



Mike's Richfield Service 

Tune Up ficRepairs 
Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

Pickup & Deliyery 

1999 Pine St., San Francisco 

Mike Inouye WAlnut 1-2955 



"THE TERMITE MAN" "THE EXTERMINATOR" 



State Licensed 

15 Years Experience 

INSPECTION - REPORIS 

ESTIMATES - REPAIRS 

Termites - Dry Rot 
Beetles 



SPECIALISTS IN 

EFFECTIVE TREATMENTS 

OF 

Rats - Mice - Insects 



7 DAYS A WEEK 
7 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

UN 1-2328 

The 
Halperin Company 

4042 - 20th St., San Francisco 



GLOBAL AUTO CLUB 

Responsible Driver will Delive 
your Car. RELIABLE 

HAL LUPAC 

133 Geory St. YU. 6-287 



AIR FRANCE 

The World's Largest Airline 
260 STOCKTON ST. 

Tickets and Reservations 

CallYUkon 2-7150 



COLONIAL FLOWER SHOI 

Floral Designs - Cut Floivers 
Corsages. Weddings a S;-ecialt 

GRACE 8 PETE BRIA, Ownsrs 
1150 Hillside Blvd. PL 5-25!i 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone iUnip:r 4-3030 

GIORGI 
TRUCKING COMPANY 

1742 FitzgrniJ Avcn;:: 

S: n Francisco 24, Colit. 



Phone UNderhill 3-4470 

Sunshine Corner Rest 
Home 

For the Ag:d — Ambdatrry 

"The Best nf Good and Care 

ERNESTINE L. McLORIl' 

1 52 1 Masonic Ave. — S. F. 



Klinger & Shaffer Co. 

Confectionery Equipment 

342 FIFTH STREET 

YU 2-5697 



Wing Sun Funeral Oirectcrs 

17 Brenhom Ploce YU. 2-071 



Judge McCarthy 

(Continueil from Page 4 ) 

f why the drive was necessary. 
Hy couldn't San Francisco have 
;h a kiddie paradise? So, egged 

by tiny Sharon, he went to 
rk on it. 

Sharon almost grew up waiting 
• it she was 11 when it finally 
jned but Storyland today is 
1 of San Francisco's most en- 
inting playgrounds foi- the 
ung in heart of all ages. 
Afhile Sharon was waiting for 
)ryland. her father was engaged 
scores of other projects, often 
the lead with far out thinking 
)ut flourides for the water sup- 

or monorail transportation. He 

larheaded the city's drive to ob- 

n big league baseball, and in do- 

■ it, almost made a dastardly er- 

that could have blighted a 

lliant career: He nearly landed 

lowly Philadelphia Athletics 

San Francisco. (In Kansas 

y, where the A's eventually 

und up. a sizable segment of 

citizenry is still trying to find 

who was responsible). 
Jut most of Mccarty's energies 
re expended to projects that 
lefit San Franciscans even to- 
'. All were time consuming, and 

constant swirl of controversy 
vitably tiring. But McCarty 
s he would not trade his seven 
xs as a supervisor "for any- 
ig." It was a wonderful, satis- 
ig experience and an education 
1 couldn't buy. 

le was president of the board 
February 9, 1959 when he was 
)ointed to the Municipal bench. 

never allowed the new dignity 
the judiciary to throw him. A 
rt time after his appointment, 
served as guest auctioneer for 
ED'S annual auction and ped- 
1 actress Kim Novak's purple 
sheets. "I got a nice price for 
m too," recalls McCarty, bare- 
suppressing a judicial leer. 



On the beni h. Judge McCarty is 
all business, md it was not long 
before an uns.ivory segment of the 
population got the message. For a 
time, there was a prevalence of ar- 
rets for illegal possession of knives 
and razors. McCarty cracked down 
- hard. "I'm tired of hearing ex- 
cuses that the knife is being car- 
ried for someone else or is intend- 
ed for some ridiculous purpose," 
he declared on one occasion, sen- 
tencing two defendants to 120 days 
in jail each for possession of razors 
on city streets. "The public safety 
and welfare demand that knives 
and straight-edge razors be elim- 
inated from the streets of San 
Francisco." 

He later declared war on drag 
racers, and began handing out 
automatic jail sentences. The drag 
racing stopped. After a cushion- 
throwing episode at Kezar Stadi- 
um, McCarty fined sheepish of- 
fenders $100 each. The cushion- 
thi owing ended. 

"Violence and sadisin must bo 
dealt with quickly and firmly," is 
McCarty's crede. 

As customaiy, McCarty led the 
ticket when he ran for the Mu- 
nicipal bench in the fall of '59. In 
June 1960, he was appointed to 
the Superior Court. An ambitious, 
capable man, he aspires to higher 
service in the judiciary. 

If you like the law and Uke be- 
ing a judge, this is a fine job. The 
salaiy is good, the security is fine. 
You'll never be a millionaire. But 
some people don't want to be. I'm 
one of those." 

Passing sentences on criminals 
isn't the most difficult of his 
chores. Most difficult ? Trying to 
determine which parent should be 
awarded a child in a bitterly con- 
tested custody case, where parents 
have vitriolic feelings for each 
other. That's a sorrowful task." 

Sometimes, his best judicial ef- 
forts do not occur while he's on 
the bench. He tries to persuade 



litigants to settle their differences 
out of court, a result which usually 
satisfies both parties and takes 
the strain off the taxpayer's pock- 
etbook. 

One day last week, he settles 
five cases in one morning. 

McCarty, his v.ife, Stella, and 
daughter Sharon, now 12, live at 
32.34 Divisadero Street. A son, Neil 
McCarty is a corporal in the U. S. 
Marines stationed on Okinawa. A 
married daughter, Mrs. Edmond 
Baume, has made McCarty a 
grandfather with her two chil- 
dren, Michael and Kelley. 

McCarty's chambera reflect his 
continued intense interest in base- 
bal. On the walls are three photo- 
graphs of Candlestick Park and 
his desk boasts a baseball auto- 
graphed by the Giants. 

Sharon is also an ardent Giant 
fan, but on occasion has overesti- 
mated her father's influence with 
the team. Early this spring, before 
the season began, McCarty was 
listening to a radio sports show 
in which the announcer made a 
reference to Hai-vey Kuenn. 

"Who's Kuenn daddy?" asked 
.Sharon, looking up from her home- 
work. "We don't have a ballplayer 
by that name." 

"Yes we do honey, we got him 
from Cleveland," replied her fath- 
er. 'He's a real good hitter." 

"Who did we give Cleveland?" 

"Antonelli and Kirkland." 

"Kirkland!" exclaimed the indig- 
nant 12-year-old. "Daddy, why did 
you let them do it?" 

For several days around the Mc- 
Carty house, the judge could not 
have been elected dog catcher. 



NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 



W;RING supplies - lighting fixtures - APPLIANCES 

5an Francisco 3, Calif.— 1830 Harrison Street— Phone HEmlock l-852y 

Santa Rosa, Calif.— 100 Fourth Street— Phone Liberty 5-3593 

San Carlos, Calif.— 1068 .American Street— Phone LYtcll 10743 

Oakland 8, Calif.— 3521 Chestnut Street— Phone OLympic 3-0416 

Unit-Bilt Store Equipment Co. 

Contractors Store Fronts - Interiors 

Manufacturers Store Equipment - Showcasses 

175 QUINT STREET Telephone ATwater 2-9900 

San Francisco 24, California 



PARK MANOR 
RESIDENCE CLUB 

CITY EMPLOYEES - Greetings 

For Rates Coll WA. I -99 1 2 

2101 LACUNA STREET 



Be Sure to Visit the Grocery Dept. 

1814 POLK STREET 

OR 3-1846 



Oreste's Restaurant 

118 JONES STREET 

GR 4-5811 

San Francisco 



OAK ASSOCIATES, Inc. 

Real Estato & jsurancc 

EDWARD J. HARLEM, President 

243 W. Portal Ave. LO 6-808 



TOPS RECOVERED 4: REPAIRED 
SEAT COVERS TAILORED TO FIT 

ClMhioti & Unliolslerv Built & Rcn.ilrcd 

THE JAMISON AUTO TOP COMPANY 

1581 BUSH STREET 

San Francisco 9, Calif. 

CHARLES & NELLIE BERNHARDT 

Telephone ORdway 3-33170 



Cre.salia Jewelers 

Watches ■ Silverware - Jewelry 

278 POST STREET 

SU 1-7372 



Jim McCoy's Shell Service 

Complete Automotive Service 

SSH Green Stamps 

7th Avenue flc Lincoln Way 

LO 4-5176 



Perramont Hotel 

Reasonable Rates 

Mrs. Betty Beahmer, Mgr. 

2162 MARKET STREET 

MA 1-3485 



Hildreth's 


Pharmacy 


Prescription Spec 

Drugs - Sundries - Si 

Needs 

2998 Mission St. a 

MI 7-1289 


alisls 
k Room 

t26th 



HILL & CO. 
Realtors 

2107 UNION STREET 
WA 1-3040 



The Doughnut Center 

3020 TARAVAL STREET 
SE 1-9580 



Notre Dame des Victoires 
High School 

659 Pine Street San Francisco 8 
EXbrook 2-0212 



4E-JULY, 1961 



Bay Window 

(Continued from Page 3l 

to the staid Emporium operation ? 
Well, the "Big E"- creator, you'll 
be happy and relieved, too. to know 
is none other than Henry Alexan- 
der, pi-omoter-with-a-toueh-of-the- 
phrenetic. who is now the master- 
mind behind the campaign to put 
over Proposition "A" on the No- 
vember ballot. . . . Which is mere- 
ly the largest bond issue in San 
Francisco's history — $115,000,000 
to complete our famed Hetch 
Hetchy water system. And the 
tag-line is this: Not one cent will 
come from the shallow pockets of 
taxpayers, the entire amount be- 
ing defrayable by revenues from 
the sale of water and power! . . . 

'This with a bit of nostalgic for 
the San Francisco that was — but 
probably will never again be — that 
we report with probing pen the 
sign that waves amidst banners on 
McAllister Street; "Save The Fox 
Theater!" You got a more futile 
sign to wave ? . . . And before 
that fading anachronism. Father's 
Day, fades into the commercial 
twilight zone forever and for good. 
may we seiiously nominate The 
White House — R e g g i e's, not 
Jack's, you fool! — for its imagin- 
ative and rewarding advt. series, 
"We Remember Papa" . . . 

FARMER STILL IN TOWN: 
Fabulous farmer John Brucato has 
a career both star-flecked and con- 
sistent — going back. back, back to 
his founding days of the Farmer's 
Market, his early-war espousement 
of victory gardens in Golden Gate 
Park, his authoring of an authen- 



tic book ("Farmer Goes to Mar- 
ket"), his development of the 
Water Department's agricultural 
empire (he's Agricultural Lands 
Superintendent!, his recent ap- 
pointment by Governor Brown to 
the Cow Palace Board . . . 

You didn't know San Francisco 
is in the farming business ? Each 
year there's a gross yield in the 
neighborhood of $400,000 from 




JOHN BRUCATO 
Superintendent of Agriculture 

such a far-out (well. Sunol in 
southern Alameda Count y is far 
out, isn't it?) faiming operation 
as walnuts, strawberries, roses, 
cork trees plus leasing of land for 
cattle grazing ... In all, some 38,- 
000 acres are involved, all of it out- 
side San Francisco . . . This, then, 
it a fittingly authentic area for the 
proven talents of San Francisco's 
No. 1 Farmer. John Brucato . . . 
SO PURELY PERSONAL is 



this that .vou may skip it without 
offending. On the other hand, per- 
haps .vou should .share with us the 
significant infonnalion that the 
sixth member of the third gener- 
ation of City-County Hecord Al- 
iens was born June 7 in Stanford 
Hospital. Palo Alto. . . . And that 
the name of this extremely vital 
statistic is Diane Marie, daughter 
of Dick and Ruth Allen (Dick's a 
technician with Stanford Research 
Institute I . . . And that veteran 
Grandmother Florence Allen is 
acting silly and happy as though 
this were her first grandchild. . . 

MORE CROSSING OF "T's": In 
connection with recent attendance 
news from Storyland. we were de- 
pressed that attendance has fallen 
50 per cent in its second year of 
operation, elated that more rev- 
enue is derived from adults than 
children . . . Thus we are prompt- 
ed into suggesting a way of put- 
ting this charming creation of De- 
signer Don Clever into the com- 
fortable black: Keep out the kids, 
ungrateful little penny-pinchers 
that they are- -allow only the free- 
wheeling adults across the moat 
and through the castle-entrance at 
Fleishhacker's Zoo . . . And don't 
let the kids return until they are 
able to show the color of their 
coin! . . . 

The PR people are moving 
around again: Joe Packman, one- 
time Managing Editor of the one- 
time Call-Bulletin, has left the 
editing of the Budde papers to 
other hands in order to accept the 



Frank Portman, Jr. 

CONTRACTOR 

Residential & Commercial 

4190-A MISSION STREET 

JU. 4-4414 



Portola Drayage 

FRED &. LOU 

14^9 Van Dyke Avenue 

MI. 8-3160 



Foschetti's 
Shell Service 

5897 MISSION STREET 
JU. 7-7000 



The Monterey Cleaners 

"Look at your Clothes. 

Other People do." 

643 Monterey Blvd. DE 3-7644 



H. B. Wiley, Jr. 
Termite Control 

140 SADAWA STREET 
JU. 7-3162 

J & E Manufacturing 
Co. 

COMMERCIAL SEA TING 
1193 VALENCIA ST. 



Compliments of 

Walter B. Kreutzinan 

2000 Van Ness Ave. 

GR 4-6246 

John Perry Realty 

4611 MISSION ST. 
PL 5-6254 



SAM'S VILLAGIN 

Meet your Friends in Cheery 
Atmosphere 

Sam Schweitzer, Prop. 

1440 Sunnydale Ave. DE 3-3557 



CHRIS'S SEA FOOD 

SHORT ORDERS 

694 MISSION STREET 

DO 2-2373 



1 

'i 
PR Director job with the spankll 
new Golden Gate National Bar 
. . . And Bob Rockwell. PUC, PI 
is switching assignments from Ai 
port to Muni while Ben Gaine 
counteipart PR, goes from Muni 
Airport . . . 

The money-making Airport hi 
just added a new airline to its li 
with National making it No. 1 
Delta is expected within a mon' 
to make it No. 15 . . . Incidental! 
National arrived from Florida wii 
a turbo prop Electra on its i i u 
ural flight; at the same i 
flew into Los Angeles With 
. . . Jets are due for the SF ri 
in October . . . Which reminds i 
for no reasonable reason that tl 
sooner we do something ;ib;)i 
pigeons, the better! Leave us s 
rally around such outstandir 
pigeon-haters as Walter Haas at 
Sherman Duckel . . . The BIytl 
Zellerbach boys ought to r mhi i 
trate on this problem insl-. ■! - 
trying to do Russ Wolden and Ma 
Carberry out of jobs! 



Ml Rancho Super Market 

Latin American Food Li:.c 

Tortilla Manufacturers 

3365 - 20th St. MI 7-0581 



"MAC DAVID" 

RADIO SC TV SERVICE 

1051 POLK ST. 

TU 5-1750 

Helene 
Salon tie Coiffure 

Distinctive Hair Styling 

Permanents 

1930 Sutter St. FI 6-980* 



Marie & Sam's Cleaners 

Laundry SC Alterations of All Kinds 

Expert Dyeing 
Phone MArket 1-1972 

381 GUERRERO STREET 



•WE SPECIALIZE IN YOUR NEEDS" 



RE-LY-ON 

Drywall, Taping, Texturing & Painting 
848 COLE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. MO 1-2060 

Evening: AT 2-1774 -JU 6-2651 



THE RECOR 



WHIT HEINRY 

( Continued from Page 5 i 
Tiaybo I should say up to the 

of 90, will bo intrigued beyond 
isure if only they go to a de- 
tful toy shop on Grant Avenue 
I'cen Green and Union with 

fascinating name "Happy 

igs. " This store was first 
led by the celebrated, interna- 
ally famous artist Wolo. One 
Volo's admirers, Cleveland born 
e Schubert, came to San Fran- 

and soon became associated 

1 the owner in the store's op- 
ion. A local puppeteer, Lettie 
nell, often conferred with Wolo 
it puppeteering, and so met 
ubert who adopted San Fran- 
as his home. Little imagina- 

is needed to complete the 
y. Wolo sold his business ven- 
: to the two youngsters who 

are Mr. and Mrs. Schubert, 
store is recognizel as an inter- 
onal Puppet Center. Toys on 

come from over 30 different 
itries. If you are looking for 
unusual in gifts for children 
t overlook "Happy Things." 



ere are a few more paragraphs 
it the Shriners Hospital for 
ipled Children taken from an 
rmational pamphlet: 
ne San Francisco Shriners Hos- 
1 is an outstanding example of 
nodern, progressive hospital, 
stantial construction, attrac- 
architecture and spacious 
iens provide a suitable back- 
md for one of the most fully 
pped institutions of its kind, 
beautifully designed and ap- 
ted physical therapy room in- 
es a pool with special hydro- 
: r a p y equipment. Operating 
ns have been designed and 
pped in a manner consistent 
I the high standards of surgery 
rigidly maintained. Specially 
pped looms provide for educa- 
aJ and recreational activities, 
a spacious, modern kitchen 
I area serving facilities assure 
)er preparation and serving of 
Is. Modern dietaiy facilities 
It in scientific planning of 
Is, and balanced, healthful 
s. A complete laundry, a sew- 
room and a shop for making 
;es and accessories permit effi- 
t, economical perfonnance of 
:e necessary functions. 
boys' section and a girl's see- 
in opposite wings of the build- 
provide roomy, cheerful quai- 
for the children. Througout 
entire hospital, and particular- 
in these sections, decorations 
appointments emphasize a 
c policy of the Shriners Hos- 
Is. namely, to provide a happy, 
nal environment for children 
se mental rehabilitation is 
n as important as their physi- 
treatment. Cleanliness and or- 
iness are apparent everywhere, 
the atmosphere is that of a 
lerj' rather than a hospital, 
lie Medical and Surgical staff 



of the hospital is headed by a 
Chief Surgeon who is assisted by 
a Chief Pediatric Consultant, an 
Assistant Chief Surgeon, two Resi- 
dent Orthopedic Surgeons, a Resi- 
dent Pediatrician, and consulting 
surgeons and physicians in spe- 
cialized fields. Functions of vital 
importance are performed by the 
Dietary Department, which in- 
cludes a specially qualified woman 
chef, the Physical Therapy Depart- 
ment, the Occupational Depart- 
ment and the Brace Making De- 
signer. A permanent staff of grad- 
uate nin-ses is regularly assisted 
by groups of student nurses, nurses 
aides and attendants. Valuable 
assistance in matters of education, 
recreation and social welfare is 
rendered by Women's Au.xiliary 
and Red Cross groups. 

Because the capacity of the hos- 
pital is limited to sixty resident 
patients, each child receives close 
personal attention and care at all 
times. All members of the staff 
aie selected with extreme care, and 
high standards of qualification are 
observed. Only those with a sin- 
cere love and interest in children 
are chosen, to assure that the com- 
plex job of child rehabilitation is 
handled with intelligence and un- 
derstanding. The result of these 
policies in staff appointments is 
reflected by the quiet competence 
with which its work is performed, 
and in the happiness of the chil- 
dren. 

In my next column I will give 
the concluding paragraphs from 
the most infomiative booklet on 
the local Shriners Hospital. 



Mabel Mintoii 
Guest House 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9253 



North Beach French- 
Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



Civic Center Stationery 

Complete Line of Stationery 

468 McAllister street 

Across from the City Hall 
MArket 1-8041 



IDEAL HOTEL 

A Worl^mgrnan's Hotel 

Transient and Weekly 

A Home Away frtim Home 

1334 Stockton St. SU. 1-9613 
San Francisco I I 



G. W. THOMAS DRAYAGE AND RIGGING CO., INC. 

GENERAL DRAYING - FREIGHT FORWARDING 




114- 14th STREET 

MEnilock 1-9624 

San Francisco 



Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Est:,Wlslicd IS'M 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 
Executive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, Calif. 



THOMASSER & ASSOCIATES 

Caterers - Wines y Spirits 
1228 Twentieth Avenue San Francisco 22 

F. FRAGOMENI & SONS 

Woolworth Poultry and Delicatessen 

Corner of Powell and Market Streets 
San Francisco, California 



WELLS CARGO Inc. 

TRANSPORTATION and GENERAL CONTRACTING 

1775 East Fourth St. Reno, Nevada Phone FAirview 9-006 1 
Reply to P.O. Box 1511 — RENO, NEVADA 

CLUB CATERING CO. 

MRS. DOROTHEA GUTTMANN, President 

Inflight and Industrial Food Services 

1461 OLD BAYSHORE BLVD. Diamond 2-6361 

Burlingame, California 

A. J.-\CK C.^NSBURC, General Manager 



IE -JULY, 1961 



PUB. LIBMRY PERIODICAL ROOM 

Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, Calif, 

52 X».l/59 (3077) 3630 



DULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San rrancisco^ Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



Entertaining for Lunch or Dinner? 

Try the friendly atmosphere and thrifty priees at the 
Whitcomh Hotel. 

Either the restful Main Dining Room or the cozy, in 
viting Vienna Tavern will provide the ideal setting. 

If you are planning a banquet or a dance, stop by the 
Whitcomb and let a member of the staff show you the 
Vista Room, Crystal Ballroom or one of the many 
smaller banquet rooms ready for your use. 

For overnight guests, newly decorated rooms, many 
with television, provide comfortable accommodations 
convenient to the San Francisco City Hall, plus the 
ease of free parking. 



WHITCOMB HOTFl 

Market at Ninth 
UNderhill 1-9600 




Fresh Meats that Are Good 



Phone DOuglas 2-8480 



SAN FRANCISCO MEAT CO. 

Specializing in Veal - Finest Quality Meats 
Wholesale and Retail 

HUGO FAMBRINI 
niO GRANT AVE, near Vallcjo San Francisco, California 

BAY ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CORP. 



BOB HUPP 

761 CIcmintina St. San Francisco, Calif. 



UNderhill 3-5595 



ALPINE REST HOME 

Expert Care — Bed, Semi-Bed and Ambulatory — Delicious Food 

Special Diets if Needed — State Licensed Nursing Care 24 Hours 

MRS. RUTH BAKER, Owner-Operator 

152 ALPINE ROAD WALNUT CREEK, CALIF. 

YEllowstone 5-5560 



Marsh & McLeivivajv- 

COSGROVE & Com PAX Y 

Insurance Brokers 

CONSULTING ACTUARIES 
AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 

One Bush Street • San Franisisco 
523 Central Bldg. • Oakland 

ChiL-a;;o Hew Tonj Sa.. Fronasm Miimfapolis Dcuon Lm Angdcs 
Boitoii Piir,(burgh .Se.itrle S'. Loms linii<inapoli.i Si. Paitl PorllunJ 
Bulfalo Diiluth Arlaina Miu.ni Hew OrlMn. Tulsa Miltcaulia- 
Photnix CitiiJand NorJoU Cliarlolon Oakland San DiC8„ 

■M.VHtTf!,' ror,.,it,i Vana.uvii Cal;;arv Havana C-iraca- Lnndri.i 



HARVIS CONSTRUCTION. INC. 

General Contractors 

W. C. 'BILL" HARR, President 
946 EL CAMINO REAL 



PLaia 6-4300 



South San Froncisco, Calif 



American Express Co. 

TRAVEL SERVICES. TRAVELERS CHECKS 
CREDIT CARDS 



253 POST ST 



San Francisco 



EXbrool( 2-1083 



Elizabeth Arden 

Cordially Welcomes You to Her 
SAN FRANCISCO SALON 



550 SOTTER STREET 



Phone mon 2-3759 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 





SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE 



AUGUST- SEPTEMBER, 1961 



Tom O'Connor to Run for City Attorney 

San Francisco is fortunate that with the retirement of City Attor- 
ney Dion Holm a thoroughly able and experienced successor, Tom 
O'Connor, is a candidate for the olfice. 

O'Connor's recent resignation 
from city service cleared the way 
for his candidacy and climaxed a 
14-year career as a Deputy City 
AttoiTiey, the last eight of which 
found him filling with great dis- 
tinction the most important staff 
assignment under the City Attor- 
ney-Public Utilities Counsel. This 
exacting position is that of chief 
attorney for the International Air- 
port, the Hetch Hetchy Project, 
the Municipal Railway, and the 
Water Department, representing a 
combined capital investment of 
$371. .586.000 by San Francisco tax- 
payers. As his many friends are 
aware, Tom O'Connor, previous to 
his most recent assignment, en- 
gaged in all phases of the gen- 
eral duties of the office, including 
extensive court and jury trial 
work. Now forty-seven years of 
age, his fourteen years of prac- 
tice in the field have made him 
an active, sound, experienced and 
successful municipal lawyer. 

A city- wide citizens committee, 
under the leadership of Mrs. Byron Arnold, Jefferson Beaver. Su- 
pervisor Joseph M. Casey. Harold Faulkner. Vincent F. Finigan. Sr., 
Bert W. Levit. Cyril Magnin, J. Philip Murphy. R. Adm. Anthony J. 
Quigley (USNR, Ret.), and Reginald Vaughan has been formed to 
back the O'Connor candidacy. 

Retiring City Attorney Dion R. Holm has enthusiastically en- 
dorsed Tom O'Connor to succeed him. stating. "Only an attorney of 
wide experience in municipal legal matters can satisfactorily perform 
the unique and important duties of this office, and of all the attorneys 
I know, both within city service and without, none is as well qualified, 
capable, and as dedicated to his work. He stands head and shoulders 
above any other of the announced candidates for the office of City 
Attorney." 

Concurring with Mi'. Holm is the uniform opinion of over 1200 
San Francisco lawyers who have pledged their support to Tom 
O'Connor. 

With those who know him best — his co-workers and the members 
of the legal profession in San Francisco — Tom O'Connor is the out- 
standing choice for San Francisco City Attorney. 




TOM O'CONNOR 
Candidate for City Attorney 



AUTO SEAT COVERS - TIRES 
FLOOR MATS - SAFETY BELTS 

Everything Automatic! 

San Francisco owned, San Francisco preferred — 




Auto Needs at Saving Prices ... in 5 Convenient Stores 




"Shooting" power lines over canyons 

helps keep PG&E service 

your best bargain 

Tills PG&E lineman is stringing power lines — not hunt- 
ing. Canyons, streams and other obstacles slow up power 
line construction. But not with a modern line-throwing 
gun! It can shoot a light line more than 400 feet over 
obstructions — then the powerline is attached and hauled 
through otherwise impassable sections quickly — and eco- 
nomically. Saving time and construction costs with effici- 
ent methods like this is another example of creative 
engineering at Pacific Gas and Electric Company as it 
builds ahead for a state on-the-grow. ^^ 

CREATIVE ENGINEERING • PIONEERING RESEARCH • PROGRESSIVE PLANNING 



Walgreen Agency 
Wines & Liquors 
Perfumes 



Pay Station for ^ 

P. G. & E. Co. \ 

S. F. Water Dept. 



CARELLA PHARMACY 

Reasonable Prices 

Prescription Department 

22nd Avenue & Irving St. 



p. J. (Pat) Maniscalco 



SE 1-1018 
SE 1-1800 



THE RECa 



bay ^w i n d. 




Well, it's opera time — Opera Time, that is - again in this City 
the Sainted Francis, and, as usual, the Golden Horseshoe will be 
tremely well lit or, at any rate, glittering- with people you know, 
(bering away to each other — and at each other — with the repartee 
Lhout which "Lucia Di Lammermoor" would be nothing at all, 
ir girl. 

3o come with us on an unusual 
ndeed, incredible — tour of the 
rseshoe. For off we go, tippy- 
I through the looking-glass and 
i in . . . 






Richard Chase of the Scripp.<- 
Hearst organization was so in- 
trigued with the off-the-recordnesG 
of it all that he decided to stay on 
at Strand's. In this decision he 
was joined by a merry little group 
of no-opera-lovers including Mi. 
George P. (for "pursestrings" .since 
he is in charge of PUC accounts) 
Negri and Mr. James Leary who 
was happily without his tie anj 
Mr. Joseph J. Allen, the newly 
former E.\ecutive Secretary to t;.e 
Mayoi', who softly suggested — so 
that only those within a 12-block 



At this, Heniy confided he had a 
friend a relative, actually —who 
could handle the icing of the Cow 
Palace for something imder $800,- 
000. 

BOX B . . . Mr. Roger Boas, can- 
didate for the imp<irtant office of 
Supervisor, was ent<Ttaining his 
guest, Mr. Raymond S. Kimbell, 
General Manager of the Recreatinn 
& Park Department, with a llltins 
(Continued on Page 14) 



DICK CHASE 

JOX A . . . Mr. George Gitibb, 
: genial and civil Civil Service 
rap confiding to his guests, Mr. 
smas McGrath of the Cannen's 
ion — which reminds us, "Carmen 
1 be heard from at another date 



;iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

he Magazine of Good Government 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publisher 

Published ai 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

\UGUST • SEPTEMBER. 1961 
OLUME 28 NUMBER i: 



JOSEPH J. ALLEN 

— and Mr. Russ Cone of the slight- 
ly lagging but still Monarch of the 
Dailies, that raises are in store foi- 
everyone who is anyone this fiscal 
year. The merry group was enter- 
tained before the opera at rear-by 
Strand's, rendezvous of the civic 
"in", where Henry — who had to 
stay and work — had planted the 
raises-fcr-most-everyone idea in a 
most confidential manner while radius could hear — that opera w.-s 
chatting with Mr. Grubb. And, in for the birds, anyway, and there 
the interest of objective report- was nothing, no, nothing, that 
ing, it must be recorded that Mr. coud take the place of ice hockey. 




THOMAS LYNCH 



G. 


W. THOMAS DRAYAGE AND RIGGING CO., INC. 




GENERAL DRAYING - FREIGHT FORWARDING 




^^,,-^^^^^ " 114 - 14th STREET 




^^^^^^ /f^ HEmlock 1-9624 


i 


I^JjHI^^ San Francisco 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




hven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited ail 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must: if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visitinf; friends; 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothine like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit: fares are surprisingly 



UDrirei, 

Limousines, 

Charier Buses 

available 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
■VUlcon 6-4000 



G. -SEPT. 1961 



Large Coaching Staff for Police Athletic League AUTO-TORIIIM STORES 



One of the largest football 
coaching staffs in the coiintiy is 
handling the Police Athletic 
League squad of youngsters from 
11 to 14 years in the Pop Warner 
League. 

This is not due to oveiemphasis 
but because police officers are do- 
ing the coaching in their spare 
time. Since most policemen change 
schedules every week, alternating 
with the midnight shift, this cre- 
ated a problem. 

As a result. Inspector Dan Shel- 
ley, head coach, came up with the 
imique idea of creating two units 
of police football coaches, with five 
men to a unit. They will alternate 
each week to ease the problem of 
the midnight shift. 

Created by the San Francisco 
Police Officers Association, the 
PAL group faced a financial prob- 
lem since they depend on donations 
to equip teams. To outfit a football 
team of youngsters cost over 
$1,000, and money was also needed 
for two baseball teams and a soc- 
cer squad. 

The 1700 members of the depart- 
ment were asked to donate $1 each 
and the Guardsmen came to the 
rescue with an additional $750. 

The PAL football team practices 
three times weekly at the Polo 
Fields in Golden Gate Park, 37th 
avenue and Fulton street. There 
are two other San Francisco teams 
in the Pop Warner League. The 
Les Vogel Power Gliders are 
coached by Robert Hassing, an in- 
surance agent, and Officer Steve 



Spelman of the Accident Preven- 
tion Bureau coaches the Hibernian 
team. 

The PAL schedule open Septem- 
ber 20 with the police team meet- 
ing San Carlos at the Galileo High 
School field. 

Head Coach Shelley of the PAL 
team started his football career at 
Mission High School where he 
played center on the 1935, '36 and 
'37 teams. He should have no trou- 
ble impressing youngsters since he 
towers 6 feet, 6 inches from the 
ground. He is assigned to the Gen- 
eral Works detail. 

Coaches on one unit include Gon- 
zales Morales and Gus Bruneman 
(Northern Station I; John E. Farn- 
ham ( Ingleside > ; Frank Watts 
( General ) ; and William Ghckman 
( Richmond ) . 

The other unit coaches are James 
Bishop (Bureau of Inspectors); 
Banile Nilan (Mission); Salvatore 
Marota (Richmond); Dennis O'- 
Connell (Mission) and Bob O'Brien 
and Tom McDonald ( Northern ) . 

Two other assistants include In- 
spector Michael Doherty who 
played his football at U.S.F. and 
Inspector Milton Piro who played 
at the University of Oregon. 

Other games on the PAL sched- 
ule are October 4, Redwood City at 
S. F.; October 11, at Millbrae; Oc- 
tober 18, at Contra Costa; October 
25, at San Bruno; November 1, San 
Jose at S. F. ; November 8, Les Vo- 
gels at S. F. and November 15, the 
Hibernians in S. F. The annual 
Bowl Game will be November 29. 



AID DRIVER EDUCATION 

AIITO-TORIUM STORES of San Francisco, one of the largest ti 
battery and automobile ai'oessory chains In California, today 
carrjing on its ow .safe-driving program as a public service. 

The diiving-safety education program is being conducted by Au' 
Torium Stores through a free 
booklet titled "What Every 
Woman Should Know," which was 
written by Wendy Wheeler, Auto- 
Torium's feminine driving consul- 
tant. 

Written in light non-technical 
language, thousands of these book- 
lets have been distributed to the 



to-Torium hired a young wom 

driving expert. Women felt fi 

talking to her, asking questic 

and seeking advice. 

The first step in the educati 

program was a success. As a res 

of this, Wendy Wheeler beg 

v. J 1- 1 o fi writing a series of articles in I 

driver-education classes of the _ „ . „ 

public schools and are being dis- 
tributed without charge through 
private driving schools. 

Directed primarily towards wo- 
men, the illustrated booklet ex- 
plains the functions of the auto- 
mobile, simple car maintenance 
and safe driving tips. 



San Francisco Progress. The gc 
eral interest in these articles, 
demonstrated by the mail respon 
prompted Auto-Torium Stores 
produce this booklet, "What Eve 
Woman Should Know." 

These booklets now may be i 
tained without obligation 
charge at any of the five Au 
The program was begun several r^^^^^^ 3^^,.^^ ^^ g^^ Francis, 
years ago when the Auto-Tonum ^^^^^ ^^^ Masonic, Market n< 
Stores realized that most women ^^^^ g^^ Mission at 26th St., V 
today spend as much time in the ^^^.^ ^^ ^^^^ g^ ^^^ ^^ g^^^ 
automobile as in the kitchen. Wo- j^^j, 

men, however, were self-conscious . , „ . , , . . 

^. The Auto-Tonum safe-dnvi 

when it came to asking questions , ^. , ^ j 

^ ^, . education program, conducted 

about their car. .. . ^ . , ^ 

its own expense, is typical of ' 

civic contributions made by S 

Francisco businesses. 



Realizing that the woman driver 
could only learn by inquiring, Au- 



G & Z AUTO UPHOLSTERY 

Scat Covers - Ciuliions - Tofi,s 
Boat L/f))iol,Ucr> 

2727 Geary Blvd. JO 7-2646 



HOLLY PARK 
REST HOME 

Home for the Aged 

Kathryn Ors.ik, Mgr.- Director 

142 SANTA MARINA 

VA. 4-6227 



Katie R. Herring 

Home for the Aged 

272 LEE AVENUE 
JUniper 5-6424 
San Francisco 



CHINATOWN SMOKE SHOP 

845 Washington Street 
San Fran 



SINCE 1875 • FIRST FOR THRIFT 



CIVIC CENTER CONVENIENCE 



YOU EARN 

*Curr«nt r«t« 

p«r annum, compounded 

semi-annually 

Up to $10,000, 

each account is 

insured by an 

instrumentality 

of the U. S. 

Government 




I 



Make each day count 
toward success. Open your 
Savings Account today at — 



iH FRANKLIN SAVINGS 

*^^ AND LOAN ASSOCIATION market ai eighih 

^^ KtONDiKl 2 1356 



SAVINGS INSURED TO $10,000 



JOHN F. MORRISON 

REAL ESTATE 
New Address Premium Realt^ 
1448 Haight St. HE. 1-377 



Mel-WiHiams Company! 

Canned & Frozen Food Serricea 

15 California Street San Francisi 

Telephone: EXbrook 2-7366 



"^^M- 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANT!! 



THE RECO( 



A CODE OF ETHICS AT CITY HALL? 



By VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 



Because of wide interest caused by news reports that a group o/ 
San Francisco's non-e/ective City and County extcutives were considering 
adoption of a code of ethics, the City-County Record asl{ed VirRil L. 
Elliott, city Director of Finance and Records and secretary of the Munici- 
pal Exccutit'c Emplovees' Association, to prepare this article. Elliot! 
drafted the code being studied by tlie M.E.E.A. 

Editor -Ciiv-Couiilv Record. 



Why does an orgiuiization of mature men need a "eode of ethlcs"/| 
ised generally on precepts they were taught as ehiklren? That wasl 
le question powsl by a San Francisco daily new.spaper in a story on 
le c<Kle of ethical standards being considered by the city's non- 
e<"ti\e municipal officials. 
There may be many answers to 
lat question, and such answers 
jrtainly will be weighed and an- 
yzed by the 150 members of the 
m Francisco Municipal Execu- 
ves' Employees Association be- 
ire adoption of any ethical code. 
First, we should make clear we 
re referring to a statement of be- 
Jfs relating to ethical conduct, 
tiown variously as a code of 
;hics, creed or credo. Just as im- 
)rtant. it is emphasized that we 
•e not referring to laws or ordi- 
inces. 

Among the earliest groups to 
irmalize a code of ethics were 
le medical men. The preamble to 
le American Medical Association's 
ide of ethics states: 
"These principles are intended to 
d ph.vsicians. individually and col- 
ctivel.v. in maintaining a high 
vel of ethical conduct. They are 
)t laws, but standards by which 
physician may determine the 
•opriet.v of his conduct in his re- 
tionship with patients, with col- 
agues, with members of allied 
•ofessions, and with the public." 




VIRGIL ELLIOTT 
Director, Finance and Records 

Members of the legal profession 
long ago set forth certain stand- 
ards of conduct or codes of ethics, 
to guide lawyers and the judiciary. 
Such tenets undoubtedly are pro- 
tective to some extent, since the 
actions of one member of a closely 
related group reflects upon the 
actions of all within that group. 



I Pressure from the entire group can 
be brought to bear on individuals 
who deviate. Thus, the reputation 
of the group can be safeguarded, 
while at the same time the public 
can be assured of high standards 
of performance. 

It can be stated that the use of 
such codes of ethics lend them- 
selves particularly to professional 
groups. Would they then be ap- 
plicable to government? Do man 
in governmental administrative 
and executive positions comprise 
a professional group ? 

A San Francisco judge said in 
his opinion government executives 
are officers of public trust whose 
actions should be guided by pro- 
fessional ethics. A prominent San 
Francisco physician observed that 
career-type governmental adminis- 
trators today are faced with prob- 
lems, make judgments and take 
actions that fit into a professional 
pattern. Increasingly, he said, men 
in government are being more 
highly educated in the skills and 
knowledge required to operate our 
complex governmental structiu-es. 

The growth of professional so- 
cieties for public administrators 
and the rapid expansion of political 
and social science courses in our 
colleges and universities are addi- 



tional indications of this trend. The 
interest of the M.E.E.A. in encour- 
aging a high level of ethical con- 
duct among its members is still 
another such indication. 

.Since its foimding 18 years ago, 
the M.E.E.A. has listed among its 
purposes of organization the goal 
of fostering and promoting higher 
standards of professional ethics for 
City and County executives. Its 
membership is restricted to non- 
elective top administrators whose 
duties and responsibilities quite 
readily flt into the profeesional 
category. 

(Continued on Page 13) 



AIR FRANCE 

The World's Largest Airline 
260 STOCKTON ST. 

Tickets and Reservations 

Call YUkon 2-7150 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

MRS. DOROTHEA GUTTMANN, President 

Inflight and Industrial Food Services 

1461 OLD BAYSHORE BLVD. Diamond 2-6361 

Burlingame, California 

A. Jack Gansburc, General Manager 

TOPS INTERIOR DECORATING 

Modern Interiors — Custom Upholstering 



See MR. MARIO 



2800 Bryant Street 



Mission 8-5777 




CLARENCE IV. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



Fruitvale Chapel 

1580 FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIlog 3-4114 



Elmhurat Chapel 

8901 E. Nth STREET 

NEofune 2-4343 



UG..SEPT. 1961 



Around and About 



By WHIT HENRY 

Many San Franciscans fail to realize that a group of students are 
ably r<»i>resentingf our city in the field of inter-collegiate athletics, and 
doing it most creditably. I refer, of course, to San FrancLsco State 
College. The following information I have gleaned from the Athletic 
News Director, Samuel N. Goldman: 
San Francisco State College is 
a member of the Far Western Con- 
ference. The conference, in addi- 
tion to S.F.S.C, is composed of 
the University of California at Da- 
vis. Sacramento State College, 
Chico State College, Humboldt 
State College, the University of 
Nevada, and the newest addition — 
Alameda State College (1961). 

The nickname of S.F.S.C. is the 
"Golden Gators." The college col- 
ors are purple and gold. 

San Francisco State College of Joe Verducci from the local grid 
scene. Verducci is still the college's 
Director of Athletics and the new 
Assistant to the Dean of Students. 
During the past six years (1954- 
19601 Rowan has been the Gators' 
line coach. During this period the 
college has had the best forward 




plays its home football contests at 
David J. Cox Stadium. It is a con- 
crete stadium built in a natural 
bowl. The stadium seats 6500 spec- 
tators and has free parking facili- 
ties for more than 2500 cars. It is 

equipped with a modern lighting 

. , ... t t„ J !,„„ walls in its quarter century of com- 

system for night contests and has ^ 

, J c ■iit„„ „„ petitive football. Rowen's linemen 

a press box and press facilities on *^ 

brought in FWC championships to 

the local campus in 1954-1956-1957- 



the south side of the stadium. 

San Francisco State College is 
a co-educational, non-denimination- 
al, state supported college. It was 
founded in 1899 with an initial en- 
rollment of 82 pupils. Today the ^tate College after a successful 
college is located at 1600 HoUoway '=^'-««'- ^' Defiance College (Ohio). 



1958-1959 and second place in 1955 
and 1960. 

Rowen came to San Francisco 



Avenue — 19th Avenue. The college 
has a total enrollment of more 
than 12,500 students. The campus 
spreads over an 100-acre area over- 
looking Lake Merced and the Pa- 
cific Ocean. The campus is sur 



When he arrived at Defiance 
1951, the college was rated a "weak 
sister" in the tough Ohio football 
conference. In less than two wears 
Rowen put Defiance College on the 
gridiron map as he guided the col- 



rounded by the modern Stonestown, ^^Se to an undefeated and untied 
season in 1953 — in fact, Rowen's 



Park Merced, and Westlake resi- 
dential and shopping areas. 

Athletic facilities at the college 
offer all types of sports programs. 
All sports programs are on the 
amateur status. The college is a 
member of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association (NCAAl and 
the Amateur Athletic Union of the 
United State (AAU|. 

Members of the San Francisco 
State College teams maintain ex- 
cellent academic standings. The 
athletic programs are an impor- 
tant part of the college's endeavor 
to offer the student a vital, inter- 
esting, and meaningful program 
which will benefit and aid him dur- 
ing his college and post-college 
careers. 

Meet the San Francisco State 
football coaching staff: Vic Rowan, 
head football coach, enters his first 
season as the Gators' head grid 
mentor. Rowan takes over the top 
football post with the retirement 



Defiance gridiron squad was the 
only undefeated and untied team in 
the entire State of Ohio that sea- 
son. 

During the post World War II 
years, Rowen became a top flight 
(Continued on Page 11) 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 1961 Fords 

Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 



NEptune 2-7676 

McGUIRE and HESTER 

GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 

ROBERT HESTER 

796 - 66th Avenue 
Oakland, Calif. 

R. lACOPI and CO. 

__ Established 1910 

Wholesale 

MEAT MARKET 

Retail 

RODOLFO lACOPI 

GArfield 1-0757 

1460 ■ 1462 GRANT AVE. 

Fine Wines 
& Liquors 

D I N O ' S 

ED FOTI, Prop. 

HEmlock 1-7369 

4122 -18th St. 



THE RECORD 



WESEl ENGINEERING SERVICE 

Complete 

Diesel Engine 

Repairs and Service 

1401 Middle Harbor Road 

Oakland 20, California 

TEmplebar 2-2118 


Marin County — GLenwood 4-8827 

SALEME CONSTRUCTION CO. 

INSURANCE REPAIRS 
OUR SPECIALTY 

R. E. SALEME, JR., General Contractor 
HEmlock 1-0J41 

3376 -16th Street 
San Francisco 10 


FOTENOS BROS. MEAT CO., INC. 

Wholesale and 
Jobbing Butchers 

1220 Howard Street 
San Francisco 3, Calif. 

UNderhill 1-4226 


THE LOWRIE PAVING CO., INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Grading - Paving - Underground Construction 

Main Office and Yard 

174 San Bruno Road 

South San Francisco, Calif. 

PLaza 5-8484 JUno 3-3574 

San Francisco Yard 

2170 Oakdale Ave., MI 7-6000 

San Francisco 24 
R. J. KILROY, Superintendent 


Bellaire Residence Club 

Cheery Atmosphere 
Reasonable Rates 

PR 5-9965 

1915 Franklin St. 


University of San Francisco 

• Undergraduate Programs 

• School of Law 

• Graduate Programs 

Evening Division 

San Francisco 17, California 

In Its Second Century of Service to California 


B &F AUTO WRECKERS 

902 Davidson Street MI 7-4664 

San Francisco 


TOM A. THEISON GLASS CO. 

AUTOMOBILE GLASS A SPECIALTY 

Plate Glass — Furniture Tops — Mirrors Made to Order 

1106-1110 Bryant St. HE 1-2844 


Scr\ine the CunstruLtion, Lumber & Marine Industries 

CARPENTER RIGGING & SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

YUkon 6-4838 

25 Tehama Street 

San Francisco 5, Calif. 



UG. -SEPT. 1961 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

;00 Cily Hall MA 1-0163 

George Christopher, llayor 

Joseph J. Allen, Executive Secretary 
Mark U Gerstle III. Confidential Secretary 
Marparet Smith. Personal Secretary 
John T,. Mont?.. Administrative Assistant 
John D. Sullivan. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS. BOARD OF 

235 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sleets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Dr. Charle.s A Ertola. President, 

2.'>3 Columbus Ave. 
Winiam C. Blake. 00 Folsom St. 
Joseph M. Casev. 2.128 Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Dobbs. 351 California St. 
John J. Ferdon. 15i> Montpromerv St. 
James L. Hallev. S70 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 
Peter Tamaras, 3G San Rafael Way 
Joseph E. Tinncv. 2,il7 Mission St. 
J. Jo.seph Sullivan. Ill Sutter St. 
Alfonso J. Zirpnli. 300 Montpnniery St. 

Robert J. DnI.Tn. Clerk 

TJIIian If. Senter. Chief As.sistant Clerk 
Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — James J. 

Suillvan. Blake. McMahon 
County. State and National Affairs — Ferdon, Casev 

Halley 
Education, Parks and Recreation — Rolph, Blake, J. 

Joseph Sullivan 
Finance, Revenue and Taxation — ■ Halley, Ferdon 

Zirpoll 
Judiciary, Legislative and Civil Service — Dobbs, 

Casey, Rolph 
Police — Casey, Dobbs, James J. Sullivan 
Public Buildings, Ijands and City Planning — J. 

Joseph Sullivan, Dobbs. James J. Sullivan 
Public Health & Welfare— Zirpoll, Hallev. McMahon 
Public Utilities— McMahon, Ferdon. Zirpoli 
Streets and Highways — Blake, Rolph, J. Joseph 



ASSESSOR 

101 Citv Hall 
Russell L. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

20B City Hall 
Dion R. Holm 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

G17 Montgomery St. 
Thomas C. Lynch 



PUBLIC DEFENDER 

700 Montgomery St. 
Edward T. Mancu.so 
SHERIFF 

331 City Hall 
Matthew C. Carberry 
TREASURER 

no city Hall 
John J. Goodwin 



EX 7-0500 
EX 2-1535 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor. City Hall UN l-855i 

H. A. VanDerZee, Presiding Gerald S. Levin 

Raymond J. Arata Kranci.s McCarty 

Carl H. Allen John B. Mollnari 

Byron Arnold Edward Molkenbuhr 

Walter Carpenetl Clarence W. Morris 

C. Harold Caulfleld Harry J. Neubarth 

Melvyn I. Cronin Edward F. O'Day 

Preston Devlne Charles S. Peery 

Norman Elklngton George W. Schonfeld 

Timothy I. FItzpatrIck William F. Traverso 

Joseph Karcsh Alvln E. Weinberger 

Joseph M. Cummins, Secretary 

480 City Hall UN 1-8552 

IV1UNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall KL 2-3008 

John W. Buasey. Presiding Clarence Linn 

Albirt A. Axelrod William O'Brien 

Robi rt J. Drew, a Raymond O'Connor 

Andrew J. Eyman LenoreD. Underwood 

Clayton W. Horn James J. Welsh 

LeIand J. I«azarus George E. Maloney 

Ivan L. Slavlch, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-300.'! 

A. C. McChcsney. Jury Commissioner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

104 City Hall 
James M. Cannon, Chief Divlf 



1 Clerk 



GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
Daniel J. Collins. Foreman 
Sydney W. Hopkins. Secretary 
Ralph A. Shcehan, Consulting Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTIVIENT 

604 Montgomery St. YU 6-2050 

John D. Kavanaugh, Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly, 399 Fremont St. 
William Moskowltz. 1901 California Street 
Robert A. Peahodv, 456 Post St. 
Adolph L. Pierotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto, 526 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SB 1-5740 



JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 445 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger, 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Halght St. 
Rev. James B. Flynn. 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Boswell, 1975 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2S9 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren MIddlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean, 

940 - 25th St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator, Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin HE 1- 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley. M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Nell SInton. 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagopian, Mills Tower 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson. 2835 Vallejo St. 

William B. Knuth, S. F. State College 

Joseph Esherick. 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President. Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer. Jr.. Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. HE 1-212 

Meets every Thursday 2;30 P.M. 

Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. 
James S. Kearney. 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Mein. 315 Montgomery St. 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter. 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Adminl.strative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy, Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller. Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall HE 1-212 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Wm. Kilpatrlck. President. 827 Hyde St. 
Richard C. Ham, 200 Bush St. 
Hubert J. Sober, 155 Montgomery St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 
DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. HE 1-218 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook. USN (Ret.), Director 
Alex X. McCausland. Public Information Officer 
EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-468 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 
170 Fell St. 

Mrs. Claire Matzger, President. 3550 Jackson St. 

Mrs. Lawrence Draper, Jr.. 10 Walnut St. 

.'Vdolfo de Urioste, 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Edward Kemmitt, 601 Polk St. 

Samuel Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 

Jo."ieph A. Moore, Jr.. 351 California St. 

Elmer P. Skinner, 220 Pell St. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt. of Schools and Sect^ 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 1-800 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

Bert Simon. President, 1350 Folsom St. 

Dr. Peter Angel. 1867 - 15th Ave. 

Philip nlndia, 536 Bryant St. 

William P. Murray, Chief of Department 

Carl P. Kruger. Deputy Chief 

Wm. P. Lindecker. Asst. Chief, Adm. 

Wm. H. Gilmore, Asst. Chief, Spec. Services 

Henry A. Lindecker, As.st. Chief, Div. Training 

Albert E. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation J 

Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary ■ 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM J 

61 Grove St. HE 1-212 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook. President. 220 Montgomery St. 
George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell, M.D., 977 Valencia St. 
Frank J. Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave. 
Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 
Robert E. Hunt. Acting Exe 



ative Dir 
Officio Members 
Committee, Board of 



Chairniar 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays 

Jacob Shemano. 988 Market St., Chairman 
Al P. Mailloux, 200 Guerrero St. 
Charles R. Greenstone, 2 Geary St. 
Solomon E. Johnson, 704 Market St. 
Charles J. Jung. 622 Washington St. 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 
PARKING AUTHORITY 

536 Golden Gate Ave. PR 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 
John E. Sullivan. Chairman, 69 West Portal 
.lay E. Jelllck, 564 Market St. 
Donald Magnin. 77 O'Farrell St. 
O. Baltzer Peterson, 116 New Montgomery S 
David Thomson. 65 Berry St. 

Vining T. F'isher. General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 



THE RECORI 



BMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 
227 City Hall HE 1- 

Mtets every Wortncsdny at 3:00 P.M. 

lllam H. H. r>avls. President. 984 Polsom St. 
itax Moore. .lOS Potrern Ave. 
jrci- Cinin. 4091 - lOlll Ave. 
,renco J. Walsh. 2450 - 17th St. 
nest I, We.1t. 205 MontBOtnery St. 
J. Edwin Mattox. Secretary 

LICE COMMISSION 

Hall of Justlco SU 1- 

Meets every Monday at 6:00 P.M. 

rold R McKinnon. President. 255 California 
ul A. UlaslnKer. P.O. nox 2-142 
onia-s J. Mellon. 390 First St. 

Thomas CahMl. Chief of Police 
Alfred J. Nelder. Deputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas ZaraKOza, Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel McKleni. Chief of Inspectors 
Lt. Wm. J. O'Rrlen. Comml.sslon Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler. Department Secretarj 



BLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 
Civic Center HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Tuesday each month at 4 P.M. 

Lee Vavuris. President. 990 Geary St. 
in M. Hranslen. 665 - 3rd St. 
Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 
le M. Panucchi. 144.1 Stockton St. 
rgaret Olrdner. 1360 Ix>nibard St. 
in B. Ourlch, 300 Monteomery St. 

f. William Turner. 1642 Broderlck St. 

g. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 
ton K. L^petlch. 1655 Polk Street 

lert E. Schwabacher, Jr.. 100 Montgomery St. 
omas W. S. Wu, D.D.S., 1111 Stockton St. 

Wilham U. Holman, Librarian 

Frank A. Clarvoe. Jr., Secretary 

BLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
1 Fazackerley. President. 851 Howard St. 
lart N. Grcenberg:, 765 Kolsom St. 
irge F. Hansen. 215 Market St. 
iir>- W. Roden. 1999 Broadway 
>nias P. White, 400 Brannan St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood. Manager of Utilities 

James J. Kinn. Secretary to Commission 

Bureaus and Departments 
ounts, 287 City Hall HIO 1-2121 

George Negri, Director 
port, San Francisco International, S. F. 28 
Belf.ird Brown. Manager PI.. 6-0500 

:ch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Oral L,. Moore, Chief Engineer and General 
Manager 

licipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 

•onnel & Safely, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
ilic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
ter Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner, General Manager 

BLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St. EX 7-6000 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays each month 

at 9 A.M. 
hola.s A. Ix)umos, President. 220 Montgomery St. 
I. John J. Murray, 1306 Portola Drive 
lllam P. Scott, Jr.. 249 Natonia St. 
queline Smith, 2015 Steiner St. 
nk H. Sloss. 351 California St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Eulala Smith. Se 



IIREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLaren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4S66 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 

at 3 P.M. 
Her A. Haas, Sr., 98 Batter>- St.. President 
er Eercut, 1 Lombard St. 
py Margaret Casey, 532 Mission St. 
11am M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 
Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 
I. Joseph A. Moore, 2590 Green St. 
n F. Conway. Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
Paul X. Moore, Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

625 Golden Gale Ave. T.N 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 

Everett Griffin, Chairman, 465 California St. 

James n. Black. Jr.. 120 Montgomerv St. 

James A. Folger. III. 101 Howard St. 

Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 

l-awrence R. Palaclos, 365 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. Executive Director 
Secret arv 



RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

93 Grove Street HE 1-2121 

Meets every Wednesday at 3 P.M. 
William T. Reed, President. 2151 - 18th Ave. 
Philip S. Dalton, 1 Sansonie St. 
James M. Hamiil. 120 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Dlcz. 2251 - 35th Ave. 
Martin F. Wormuth, 4109 I'acheco 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA 1-6600 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Frederic Campagnoli. President. 300 Montgomery 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Frank A, Flynn. 1549 Noriega St. 
Prentis C. Hale. Jr., 867 Market St. 
George T. Davis. Ill Sutter St. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson. 19 Maywood Drive 
Wilson Meyer. 333 Montgomery St. 
Guido J. Musto. 535 North Point 
Samuel D. Sayad. 35 Aptos Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern. 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 

E. Lawrence George. Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2(140 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg.. Embarcadero SII l-SOO.'i 

Raymond L. Bozzini. Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Aiemany 

Thos. P. Christian, Market Master MI 7-942.'! 

CORONER 

650 Merchant St. DO 2-0461 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend. Chief 
Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Plant 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk i Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin J. ilongan, ;;17 City Hail 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hail 
Registrar of Voters 

Charles A. Rogers. 167 City Hall 
Tax Collector 

Louis Conti, 107 City Hall 



cords Center 
li. J. LieGuennec, 160 Otis 



HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEmlock 1-2121, Ext. 704 
Lloyd Conrich. 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnin, Stockton & O'Farrell 
Frank E. Oman, 557 - 4th St. 
Terence J. O'Sullivan, 200 Guerrero St. 

Bernard A. Cummings. Secretary. 254 City Hall 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. So.x. Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
.\rthur 11. Uiini.'i. Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Vr. Szu T. 'I'sou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

l^juis A. .Moran. Superintendent MO 4-1580 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

l>r. T. E. Albers. Superintendent MI 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake. Adm. Superintendent HE 1-2S00 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hail HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 

R. Brooks Larter, 

Assistant Director, Administrative 

L. J. Archer, 

Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 

Accounts, 20(1 Cily Hall 

J. .1. M(('i<)skey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 265 City Hall 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 275 CItv Hall 

Kobeil c. l,.-vy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army 

A. If, l':k.iiberg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 286 City Hall 

.Sirtn.v Franklin. Supervisor 
Egineering. 359 clly Hall 

Clifford .1. G.irlz, CItv Engineer 
Repair 4 Sewage Treatment, 2323 



Walt 



I!. Jo 



Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. 

P.. rnard .\1. Crotty. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. 

l'\ 11. Brown. Superintendent 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 1 

Ben lienas. Purchaser of Supplies 
T. P. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purcha.ser of Supplies 

Central Shops, 800 (^uint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 

Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harriso 
J. E. Leary. Supcrvl.sor 

Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 60 
Georgf .Stanle.v. .Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

93 Grove St. 
Philip L. Rezos. Director of Property 
James T. Cr.ihani. Auditorium Mgr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 City Hall 1 

O. C. Skinner, Jr. 



HE 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HR 1 

HE 1 

Army 
HE 1 
HE 1 



-2121 
-2121 
-2121 
-2121 
-2121 
-2121 
St. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DIIPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park P. 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April. Ju 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 
Mrs. A. B. Spreckeis, Honorary President. 

2 Pine St. 
Walter !•:. Buck. President, 235 Montgomery St. 
E. Raymond Armsby, 111 Sutter St. 
Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 
Mr.s. C. Tohin Clark. House on Hill, San Mateo 
.Mexander de Bretteville, 2000 Washington St. 
Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 
Mrs. Bruce Kelham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 
Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 
William W. Mein, 315 Montgomery St. 
David PleydBll-Bouverle, Glen Ellen. Calif. 
John N. Rosekrans, 333 Montgomery St. 
William R. Wallace. Jr., 100 Bush St. 
Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach, 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 
President, Rec 

Thomas C; 

Capt. Myron E. Th 



BA 1-5610 
Oct. 



& Park Commissi 
Howe. Jr.. Director 
Secretary 



M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. April. June. Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron. Honorary President, 
Hillsborough 

Rieh.-.rd Rhcem, Temporary Dir.. 16.59 Russ Bldg. 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Po.«t 

Mi-ss Louise A. Boyd, 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

Charles de Young Thieriot. 18(12 Floribunda. Hills- 
borouerh 

R. Gwin FoIIis. 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Heimbucher. 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garret McEnerney. II, 3725 Washington St. 

Roscoe F. Oakes, 2006 Washington St. 

Joseph O. Tobin, 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker, Burlingame Country Club 

Charles Page. 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Filoli San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Dr. Walter Hell. Director 
Col. Ian P. M. Macalplne, Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

430 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. MA 1-1700 

Charles W. Pri'-drlchs, Secretary and Manager 



G. SEPT. 1961 



SI ATEWIDE MOVING 

BLAIR EXCLUSIVE 

PI4NO MOVERS 

ROBT. -Bob" BEGCS 
Hcimc Phone: JU 6-6::>4 Bus, Phone: MA I-')S46 

2797-16(11 Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 

ANDERSON & PERKINS, Inc. 

Licensed fe^Bondcd — Bonded Correspondents at All Points 

Specialized Collection Service 

Phone EXbrook 2-8466 

:il GEARY STREET 

San Francisco 8 

E. J. (Gorgy) (iORCENSEN 

The ELERY Arms Company 

YU 2-7121 
260 Kearny Street 

San Francisco 

PORTOLA DRAYAGE CO. 

Mission 8-3160 
1469 Van Dyke Street 

San Francisco 

REASONABLE RATES 
MRS. ATHERLEY 

LICENSED GUEST HOME 

Doctor's References — Special Diets 
Excellent Food and Care — Near Blind and Senile Welcome 

2407 Lincoln Way 
LP 4-6936 

O SOLE MIO 

Restaurant and Pizzeria 

HiHir^; 1 1 :00 :i.m. to 12:30 a.m. — Sunday thru Thursday 
Friday and Saturday: 11:00 a.m. to l-.yo a.m. 

2031 Chestnut Street near Fillmore 

Phone WEst 1-9008 San Francisco, Calif. 



HEARST CORPQRATION 

Hearst Building 

San Francisco, California 

PLaza 6-4.^00 

HARVIS Construction, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

W. C. "Bill" HARR, President 

946 El Camino Real 

South San Francisco, Calif. 

Complete Line of Golf Equipment 

Lessons by P.G.A. Professionals 

Harding Park Golf Shop 

HARDING PARK 

KEN VENTURI 
SEabright 1-1768 San Francisco, Calif. 

WESTLAKE INSURANCE AGENCY, Inc. 



All Types of Insurance 

WALTER F. BRODIE 



36 Park Ave. 



PL 5-7113 



DALY CITY 



PETERSON SUPPLY CO. 

NEON SIGN SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 
480 Fifth Street DOuglas 2-1695 

San Francisco 7, Calif. 

PACIFIC COAST BUILDERS 

Mel A. Draga • Maurice T. Worden • Harry G. Hardiman 
• Edmond R. Schneider 
Telephone YUkon 2-4756 

1 South Park 

San Francisco 7. Calif. 

Henry's Fashion Restanrant 

22 Davis St at Market St. 

San Francisco 

MERRILL S DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT 



1091 Market St. 



805 Market St. 



San Francisco, Calif. 



Craftsmen Tool Rental, Inc. 

1265 Folsom Street UN B-8883 

San Francisco, Calif. 



R & J 
HEETMETAL CO. 

1266 Sanchet Street 
VAIencia 4-7330 

orth Beach French- 
Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



RAILMOBILE, Inc. 

2030 Third Street 
in Francisco 7, Calif. 



'S 
rnamental Iron Works 

ites - Balconies - Stair Rails 

mdrails - Window Guards, 

Etc. 

General Repair Work 

Fred G. Brunschon 

140 CLEMENTINA ST. 

San Francisco 
;. 7-3110 Res. DE. 3-7929 



CHESTER'S AUTO 
REPAIR 

ne-Ups - Motor Rebuilding 
Automatic Transmissions 
Brake Service 

629 COUGH STREET 

WAlnut 1-5355 
San Francisco, Calif. 



W. Graziano & 
Co. 

contractor - Builder 
Jterations & Repairs 

1432 PALOU AVENUE 

ATwater 2-7620 
San Francisco 24, Calif. 



IIKE & JIMS GARAGE 

COMPLETE 
UTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Automatic Transmission 

Specialty 

City Towing Service 

M. FUENTES, JR. 

3950 -24th STREET 

VAIencia 6-1886 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 6) 
rollege football coach prospect as 
a result of his outstanding tutor- 
ing job in numerous New York 
City high schools. Rowen attended 
Davis-Elkins College, West Vir- 
ginia, and graduated from Long 
Island University, New York City. 
At both institutions he was an ex- 
cellent football player at the end 
position. He played on numerous 
professional football teams and had 
successful years with the Brookl.vn 
Dodgers football teams of New- 
York. 

Rowen is the college's head 
wrestling coach. He received his 
Doctor of Education degree from 
Columbia University, New York, in 
1953. He is considered one of the 
top line coaches in his field, having 
published numerous articles in the 
Athletic Journal. In 1960 he aided 
the West Shrine coaching staff as 
an unofficial member under former 
head coach Joe Verducci; the lat- 
ter being the first small college 
coach ever named to the East- 
West Shrine football coaching 
staff. 

The Gators will play five Satiu- 
day afternoon games on their home 
field and all will undoubtedly be 
filled with thrills. The dates will 
be September 16, September 23, 
October 7, October 21, and October 
28. This column takes pleasure in 
wishing the team Good Luck. 



'MAN OF THE YEAR" 



Don't forget to remember the 
date of October 28. In particular, 
the evening. That is the night when 
the San Francisco Chapter of the 
Society for the Presei-vation and 
Encouragement of Barber Shop 
Quartet Singing in America pre- 
sents its annual concert. This year 
the parade of quartets will appear 
in the Nourse Auditorium. Watch 
the daily papers for more complete 
details. In the past the finest quar- 
tets in the West have been pre- 
sented to the public, and this year 
will be no exception. In fact, this 
year's show will probably be the 
finest vet. 



MOUNT 

OLIVET 

CEMETERY 

I 105 Fifth Avenue 

GL. 4-4283 — 4-2404 

San Rafael 




J. EUGENE "GENE" McATEER 

San Francisco's State Senator J. 
Eugene McAteer was named as the 
City of Hope's 1961 "Man of the 
Year." 

An estimated 1,000 persons are 
expected to attend the banquet 
honoring McAteer at the Fairmont 
Hotel on November 12, proceeds of 
this testimonial will go to the Cit.v 
of Hope, the unique free and non- 
sectarian National Medical Center 
at Duarte, California. 

Few men more richly deserve 
this honor and recognition than 
Senator McAteer. His contribution 
to the welfare of our community 
and his humanitarian ideals are in- 
deed consonant with the great 
principles of scientific adv'ance- 
ment and human dignity for which 
the City of Hope is noted through- 
out the nation. 

"To be named man of the year 
by the City of Hope is an honor 
which I will always prize. City of 
Hope is an outstanding philan- 
thropy which serves not only our 
State but the entire Nation," Mc- 
Ateer said. 



Seaboard Hotel 

'"Hear Everything" 

Mr. c^ Mrh. James Grayson, 

Mj^r. -Owner 

226 Embarcodero DO 2-9463 



The Rendezvous 

COCKTAILS 

Dancini; Fri. y Sat. Evenings 

708 Clement St. EV 6-9797 



Sunshine Rest Home 

24 Hour Care fur Ambulatory 

Guests — Men 6^ Women 

Elevator Service --- Anne Murray 

719 - 36th Ave. SK 1-7705 



EDDY HOTEL 

PEARtlE MULLIN5 
1430 Eddy Street 
WAlnut 1-0165 



Gene's Auto Repair 

COK/IPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 

SERVICE 

155 Willow Street GR. 4-977( 



Southern Heights Barber Shop 

Forrest Springer. Owner 

1328- 18th Street UN 3-4896 



DANTE HOTEL 

310 Columbus Avenue 
EXbroolc 2-9458 



UNIVERSAL CAFE 

Chinese Food — Cocktail tounge 
824 Washington St. YU. 2-3493 



THOMAS THOMASSER 

WINES & SPIRITS 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
LO 40180-2 

PETER GIOVANZANA 

Furniture — Draperies — Carpets 
at a Savings 

PR 61552 

Pacific Ave. a( Polk 



Aquatic Park 
Concessions 

Foot of Van Ness Ave. 
San Francisco 

OTAGIRI MERCHANTILE 
CO., INC. 

70 Pine Street 
GA. 1-8846 

San Francisco 

TEDDY'S 
PET SHDP 

Complete Line of 

Pe+s & Pet Supplies 

3730 Geary Blvd. 
SKyline 2-1833 

MAIL-AWAY 
SERVICE 

Processors of Kodak Service 

P.O. BOX 3563 

RINCON ANNEX 
SAN FRANCISCO 19 



ire - Liahility - Life - Autc 

RAYMOND a. WONG 

INSURANCE BROKER 

Western Life Insurance 
Company 

818 CLAY STREET 
Bus.: GA 1-3975 



A-1 NURSES 

REGISTRY 

693 Sut+er Street 

GR. 4-7005 

San Francisco 



Bitildhiii Material Headquarters 

BAYSHORE WRECKERS, INC. 

Successor? t<i 
SYMON BROS. WRECKERS 

NEW AND USED LUMBER 
and BUILDING MATERIALS 

621 Baystiore Boulevard 



San Francisco 24 



JUniper 6-0678 



FILLMORE & ELLIS KEY SHOP 

Keys Made While vo.i Wan 

LOCK REPAIRS 

LUGGAGE REPAIRS 

1580 Ellis St. Fl 6-3817 



KOWII'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

We Give 
Si>H Green Stamps 

2 Steiner Street MA. 6-0530 



Phone: WAlnot 1-4758 

A Community Chest Agency 

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 

Community Service Center 
James E. Stratten, Exec. Dir. 

800 Presidio Avenue 

San Francisco 15 



LOIS HARPER 

Complete Real Estate Service 

"Your Home Is Your Future" 

5032 Geary Blvd. SK. 2-8248 



COLMA GOLF RANGE 

Golf Lessons by Larry Montes 

Golf Professional 

3405 Junipero Serra Blvd. 

PL. 5-8140 ColiT 



Electronic Training Laboratory 

The A B C^s of Electronics 

We Train You for the Big Pay 

Jobs — Spare Time — - Low Cost 

4111 BROADWAY 

OL. 8-5228 Oakland 



WEST COAST WASHING MACHINE 
CO. 

Maytag Sales - Service & Parts 
487 Valencia St. UN. 1-5835 



FAR EAST CAFE 

FINEST CHINESE FOOD 
631 Grant Ave. YU. 2-3245 



Ivy's Beauty Salon 

HAIR STYLING 
18 121/2 Eddy Street JO. 7-3684 



BILL'S APPLIANCE SERVICE 

Keys Mode While You Wolt 
1783 Haight St. SK. 1-5921 



ALLIED REFINISHERS 

for the Finest 
130 Dore Street MA. 1-7550 



GEORGE L BORGER 

^V holesale Dealer 

POTATOES ac ONIONS 

52 Vallejo St. EX. 2-1313 



Bush's Sandwich Shop 

Sandwiches - Short Orders 
240 Kearny Street GA. 1-6948 



HUNTER MDXING-EXPRESS & 
TRANSFER 

Slate Wide Serrice 

Glen Hunter, Prop. 

3330 ORTEGA STREET 

MO. 1-2644 LO. 6-4300 



HANNAH DIRBIN 

Home for the Aged 
3131 Cabrillo St. SK. 2-5734 



FRANK PORTMAN, JR. 

General Building Contractor 
Alterations & Repairs 

4190 Mission St. San Francisco 

JU. 4-4414 LO. 4-2623 



The San Francisco 

HEART 

Association 

uses gifts and bequests to su| 

port research, education an 

community service in fightir 

the nation's No. 1 disease. 



259 Geary St. 



YU 2-575 



MATTEUCCI 
BROS. 

Choice Meats 

POULTRY - nSH - EGG« 

2794 - 24th Street 

VA 4-5419 



Klinger & 
Shaffer Co. 

Confectionery Equipmen 

342 FIFTH STREET 

YUkon 2-5697 
San Francisco 7, Calif. 

JACK'S TAVERN 

"Meet your Friends in 
Cheery Atmosphere" 

1931 Sutter St. WE. 1-845 



BONDED ROOFING 

Insured :: Licensed 
956 Pierce St. WA. 1-902 



L & B SEAFOOD 



Thos. Borthola 


mew, Owner 


1667 Silver Ave. 


San Francisc 


PETE'S SERVICE STATION 


LUBRICATION 


SPECIALISTS 


1401 -8th Avenue 


LO. 6-787 



MR. FIX-IT 

We Repoir Everything — Save 
832 Hyde St. G. F. Woo PR 1-101 



LAKE MERCED BOAT HOUSE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
Hording Park San Fronciso 



VIRGIL ELLIOTT 

(Continued from Page 5) 

One of the oldest creeds of pub- 
i; set-vice was the Athenian Oath. 
II soldiers swore to abide by it, 
nd it affected alike their conduct 
3 warriors and tlieir later behav- 
r as citizens. 

Employees of the Federal civil 
srvice have their own published 
•eed wherein members accept the 
jllgation and opportunity to serve 
le American people "well and in 
ill measure, doing our best to fur- 
iter the free and democratic insti- 
itions of our country." Members 
ledge to "serve the public with 
lirness, courtesy, integfrity and 
nderstanding ..." 

The national association of city 
lanagers originally adopted a code 
f ethics in 1921, and has twice 
mended it. Among its tenets are: 

"The city manager has a fimi 
elief in the dignitj' and worth of 
le ser\1ces rendered by govem- 
lent. Hp has a constructive, cre- 
tive, and practical attitude to- 
ard urban problems and a deep 
snse of his own social responsi- 
llity as a trusted public servant. 

"The city manager is governed 
/ the highest ideals of honor and 
itegrity in all his public and per- 
mal relationships in order that 
e may merit the respect and con- 
dence of the governing body, of 
thter officials and employees, and 
f the public which he serves. He 
Blieves that personal aggrandizo- 
lent or profit secured by confiden- 
al information or by misuse of 
ublic time is dishonest." 

A suggested public ethics code 
as developed recently in Arling- 
m County, Va., by a nonpartisan 
roup known as the Citizens Com- 
lission on Ethics in Government, 
stated that the pui-pose of its 



code was to "help officials and citi- 
zens alike to come to a better 
judgment about what is right and 
what is wrong ethically in the ex- 
ercise of public functions." 

Recognizing the limitations of 
any such code, the Arlington group 
noted that "No code of public eth- 
ics, by itself, can drive selflshnoss 
from public offices (or) make de- 
voted public sei-vants out of crook.? 
... It can draw attention to the 
importance of public ethtics. It 
can restrain those who reap pel- 
sonal gain by ignoring pui;lJo 
ethics. It can, above all, increase 
the influence of the large majority 
of people to whom a high stan.i- 
arc of official condvict is a sell- 
evident necessity." 

In Pennsylvania, a group of !n- 
ca! government officials who hav.? 
been studying a credo for publi'; 
administrators, suggested that per- 
haps a code for legislators shouM 
be separate from one for adminis- 
trative officers. In a published a'- 
ticle this group declared that 
"Without any official sanctions the 
agreement on a code of ethics and 
its publication for ready reference 
could lift local government to a 
gi'eater public trust." 

In April of this year President 
Kennedy urged Congress in a spc- 
cal message to adopt ethical prac- 
tices for the executive bi-anch and 
the regulatoiy agencies. In May, 
Secretai-y of Commerce Luther H. 
Hodges stated that "Both govern- 
ment and industry are anxious to 
do everything possible to achieve 
renewed public faith in the ethicol 
ideal of management." 

It is ;n this climate, then, V.^i 
members of the M.E.E.A. are coa 
sidering a code of ethtics for it? 
150 members. The specific code ui' 
der study is worded as fcl'ows: 



1. In the position entrusted t i 
me, I recognize that I am not th.> 
owner of authority but an agent 
of public purpose. 

2. I am obliged to sei-\2 .n my 
position with efficiency, to rcspec. 
legality, and to heed the commands 
of morality. 

3. As a guardian of the pul'.ic' 
interest, I must serve equally um 
members of my community without 
prejudice or favoritism towaid a \', 
individual, group, organization or 
economic interest. 

4. I shall never exercise the au- 
thtority or prestige of my position 
for personal or private advantage. 

5. I will neither accept nor curry 
any gift or favor from any donoi 
who could be benefited or discrim- 
inated against by me in the exer- 
cise of my position. 

6. I shall always consider how 
my official actions and personal 
behavior might be intei-preted 
and misinterpreted — by the public. 

7. I recognize that I have no per- 
sonal title to information which 
comes to me in the exercise of my 
position, rnd X will not permit its 
use for any but official nurposes. 

A U.S. Senate subcommittee con- 
cerned with ethical standards said 
it believed "that the ethical stand- 
ards of public officials are probably 
higher than those prevailing in 
business and other walks of life. ' 

Whether or not that be the case.-, 
many members of the M.E.E.A. be- 
lieve they should strive toward sti!! 
higher standards in San Fran- 
cisco's City and County govern- 
ment. And they have begun the 
task of assembling such '5tandatd- 
into a written code of ethics. 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 

Inslrumenti (or Hond Surgery 

Acllvo Hond 8, Finger Splints 

70- 12th Street MA. 1-6876 



Mike's Richfield Service 

Tunc Up acRepairs 
Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

Pickup & Delivery 

1999 Pine St., San Francisco 

Mike Inouye WAInut 1-2955 



COURT ROOM 

Len and Jim Courtncy 
501 Von Nest Ave. 
HE I-I0I4 Son Fran 



H. B. Wiley, Jr. 
Termite Control 

140 SADAWA STREET 
JU. 7-3162 



GRAND MARKET 

Be Sure to Visit the Grocery Dept. 

1814 POLK STREET 

OR 3-1846 



Biacit & White Garage 

Public Parking Si Storage 
Maintenance SC Lubrication 



955 POST STREET 
PR 5-9680 



NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 

Oistributors 

WIRING SUPPLIES - LIGHTING FIXTURES • APPLIANCES 

San Francisco 3, Calif. — 1830 Harrison Street— Phone HEmlock 1-8529 

Santa Rosa, Calif.— 100 Fourth Street — Phone Liberty 5-3593 

San Carlos, Calif.— 1068 .American Street— Phone LYtell 1-0743 

Oakland 8, Calif.— 3521 Chestnut Street— Phone OLympic 3-0416 



F. FRAGOMENI & SONS 

Wooltvorth Poultry and Delicatessen 

Corner of Powell and Market Streets 
San Francisco, California 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



Carlson Termite Control 

PROTECT YOUR HOME — YOUR PROPERTY 

CALL ON US FOR PROMPT CONSULTATION 

HONEST ESTIMATES 

Licensed by State of California 



1331 Nineteenth Avenue 



LO 4-3030 



UG. -SEPT. 1961 



BAY WINDOW 

(Continued from Page 3) 
ir.ssertation revolving glibly around 
the theme, "What San Franoiseo 
nee<i> is a city park proKram that 
is bold, modern and exp«Timenta)," 
to wlik'h Mr. Kinibell just nodded 
plaeidly from time ti> time, he con- 
templating total retirement uith- 
In the year and therefore being 
quite removed from being dis- 
turbed. 

BOX C . . . Mr. Arthur Horive 
of the Manchester Guardian, we 
think, or anyway the Fifth and 
Mission Journal, discussing a sub- 
ject that was muffled — because the 
orchestra was warming up v.'ith 
the theme from "What Makes 
Sammy Run?" — with a group of 
guests including Mayor George 
Christopher, Mr. Robert I. McCar- 
thy — who had come up from ihe 
Southland for this reunion with 
old friends — Mr. Thomas C. Lj'ucli. 
the well-known District Attorney, 
Mr. William Knowland of the Ali- 
American City Across the Bay 
where, it is hoped, it will stay, Mi , 
Former Governor Goody Knight, 
and Mr. Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Sec- 
retary of the Art Commission. A 
group making no political sense, 
certainly, but "This is a free coun- 
try and who's going to make you 
make political sense?" demanded 
Mr. Chase who had just arrived 
from Strand's and was looking for 
BOX A. 

BOX D . . . Mr. O. C. (for "Char- 
lie" ) Skinner, the affable sealer of 
weights and measures, had as his 
guests a group of dedicated opera- 
first-nighters composed of Mr. Dan 
Mattrocce, Mr. Joseph Mignola, Jr , 
Drs. Henry W. Turkel and Lloy 1 
S. Luckmann, Mr. Clifford C. Mea- 
gher. Mr. William J. Dwyer, Mr. 
Ronald H. Bom and Henry, who 
had come on over from Strand'^. 

BOX E ... Mr. J. Joseph Sulli- 
van, who had just arrived from an 
important speaking engagement at 
the Cayuga Improvement Club on 
"What the City Attorney's office 
needs is — ", had as his guest Mr. 
Thomas M. O'Connor, who had just 
arrived from an important speak- 
ing engagement at the Kast and 
West of Castro Street Improve- 
ment Club on "What the City At- 
torney's office needs is—". Since 
bothMr. Sullivan and Mr. O'Conniir 
are attorneys-at-law it is needless 
for us here to relate that they have 
so many interests in common that 
they talked on and one and it \v'as 
not until the curtain was raised 
and neighboring box-holders hissed 
"Please lower your voices" that 
they subsided. What camarderie 
those attorneys have! 

BOX F ... Mr. John G. Bru- 
cato, the Cow Palace Commission- 



er, entertained Mr. Vernon W. An- 
derson of the Municipal Railway 
and Mr. Mel Wax of One of San 
Francisco's Two Great AM's which 
was a most interesting situation 
indeed in view of the heretofore un- 
recorded fact that Mr. Wax is .se- 
cretly playing Boswell to Mi-. An- 
derson's Johnson, the working title 
of his Actionized biography which 
has already e.xceeded 300,000 words 
being "Just Plain Vernon W. An- 
derson." Also in this box as Mr. 
Brucato's guest was Mr. James H. 
Turner, one of the fathers of the 





JOHN BRUCATO 
Superintendent of Agriculture 

$115,000,000 water bond issue, who 
was explaining that the only op.no- 
sition to Proposition "A" — yes. the 
water bonds — was the "Abomin- 
able No-Man," who votes "no" on 
everything! 

BOX G . . . Mr. Virgil L. Elliott 
was reviewing "A Code of Ethics 
and Morals and Related Matters in 
Government" with a group of 
guests, who had left Strand's at 
about the same time Henry did. 
including Mr. John H. Devitt, Wr. 
Bernhard W. Grethel, Mr. John P. 
Figone, Mr. Mark L. Gerstle III, 
who has just moved from the May- 
or's Office uphill to the Bishop's 



RAYMOND S. KIMBELL 

Office on Taylor Street; Mr. Mar- 
tin W. Judnich and Mr. James P. 
Lang of McLaren Lodge, who kept 
saying, "San Francisco already has 
a city park program that is bold, 
modern and experimental!" 

BOX H . . . Mr. William S. Mail- 
liard. the well-known Member of 
Congress, had as guests Mr. James 
(.'oventiy, insurance claims service 
businessman, and Mr. John J. Mig- 
liozzi, operator of a van lines com- 
p8my. Mr. Migliozzi opined — which 
really is just a way of getting 
away from "he said" — "I am op- 
posed to the extension of freeways, 
feeling that their further construc- 
tion will mar the natural beauty 
of this great city." And Mr. Cov- 
entry remarked — you will appreci- 
ate the variety of our verbs, yes ?- - 
"I will strice to increase San Fran- 
cisco's economic and cultural qual- 
ities, to improve our educational 
system ad implement some imme- 
diate action toward our juvenile 



J & E Manufacturing 
Co. 

COMMERCIAL SEATING 
1193 VALENCIA ST. 

WAGNER HOTEL 

J. L. Jolly 

2791 - 16th STREET 

UN 3-9873 



Arnold's Appliance 
Service 

Installation - Delivery Service 

All Major Home Appliance.'; 

632 Persia St. JU 6-6100 



SAM'S VILLAGIN 

Meet your Friends in Cheery 

Atmosphere 

Sam Schweitzer, Prop, 

1440 Sunnydalc Ave. DE 3-3557 



Perramont Hotel 

Reasonable Rates 

Mrs. Betty Bcihmer, Mgr. 

2162 MARKET STREET 

MA 1-3485 



delinquency problems." Mr. Mt 
Hard, who has been in the busini 
long enough to recognize one wh 
he sees one, ventured: "Why, j 
gentlemen sound like politician! 
And Messrs. Migliozzi and Covi 
try admitted they were candidal 
for the Board of Supervisors. 
Mi . Mailliard suggested they rep. 
to Strand's and talk things ov 
At this point Mr. James Leons 
cf the Scripps Howard Monarch 
the Sort of Only Home-Owned P 
who had just appeared from a ) 
BOX with his colleague, Mr. Cha 
submitted that Strand's was inde 
an excellent place to repair 
And Henry, who had just desert 
another distant BOX and was 
the company of Mr. Jack Morrist 
the cpostate Fourth-Estater, ai 
Mr. William C. Blake, who wou 
blast Blake's bore clean throu;! 
Pacific Heights, decreed he'd h 
enough of "Lucia" and was returi 
ing- posthaste to Strand's where '. 
pioposed to again man his static 
So without further ado, off 
Strand's went the happy group I 
by the redoubtable Henry, and 1 
they passed BOX A Mr. Gru 
merrily cried "Raises for Ever 
one!" 

It was a fitting conclusion to t 
kind of annual event San Francis 
looks avidly foi-ward to, the kii 
of event that makes this City 
Ours so truly different from i 
others. And sure enough, waitil 
patiently at Strand's for Henry , 
return, were Mr. Negri, the PU( 
pursestring-holder, Mr. Leary, wl 
buys things for the City, and K 
Allen who by now was pleadil 
"Please come back, Henry. Lo( 
— here's $800,000 so's your unc 
can ice the Cow Palace for n 
hockey-men — anything, Henry, ju 
return, please, return to Stranc 
where we know you, like you ai 
appreciate you, where you're ha 
py. Henry!" 

It was such a happy, yet touc 
ing, moment that there wasn't 
dry eye in the place, and everyoi 
present agreed whole - hearted 
with Mr. James P. Lang of M 
Laren Lodge who summed it i 
thusly: "San Francisco already hi 
a city park program that is bol 
modem and experimental!" 





STEEL 


FRANK 


C. BORRMANN 




SUPPLY CO. 


Steo 


/ for All Purposes 


815 Brvan( SI 


a( 6th MArkel 1401)3 




San Francisco 3, Calif. 



THE RECOR 



PUBLIC mm 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




ILLIAM KILPATRICK 

AN INTERVIEW 

lAY WINDOW 



GROUND & ABOUT 

WHIT HENRY 




WILLIAM KILPATRICK 
President, Civil Service Commission 



OCTOBER -NOVEMBER, 1961 



SUPERVISOR TINNEY 
URGES 'YES' VOTE ON 
PROPOSITION 'B' 

Everyone dedicated to the pres- 
ervation of natural beauty should 
take an espfecial interest in Propo- 
sition B on the Novembe ballot 
which provides for acquisition at 
vne half fair market value of 116 
acres of Fotr Funston with an in- 
vestment of less than one cent in 
the tax rate over a period of 15 
years. 

Investment rather than expendi- 
ture appeal's to be the proper word 
since the State Park Commission 
has already passed a resolution of 
intent to incorporate Fort Funston 
into the State Park System during 
the next five years when funds are 
available, thus reimbursing San 
Francisco for every dollar devoted 
to acquisition. 

The United States General Serv- 
ices Administration has set a Janu- 
ary 1962 deadline for disposal of 
Fort Funston at public auction if 



JOSEPH TINNEY 
Supervisor, San Francisco 

the bond issue is not passed. 

This is a tremendous opportunity 
to acquire a natural coastal park, 
with magnifiicent open space on 
the threshhold of San Francisco 
where one can enjoy a holiday or 
Simday afternoon free from tire- 
some travel and traffic. 

It was my pleasure as President 
of your Planning Commission and 
as your Supervisor to reactivate 
and sponsor the preservation of 
this superb heritage. 



CIDILLilC 

MOTOR CAR DIVISION 

SALES - SERVICE - PARTS 



San Francisco Branch 

1000 Van Ness Avenue PR 5-0100 

Stonestoivn Sub-Branch 

201h Ave. & Ruckin^ham Way LO 4-7400 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 
— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 




Guess how many steps a clothes dryer 
can save you: 93 D 207 D 622 D 

You'll be pleasantly surprised! A gas or electric dryer lets 
you dry clothes in minutes — rain or shine, day or night. 
And new dryers reduce hea't automatically to protect deli- 
cate fabrics . . . laundry comes out softer, wrinkle-free so 
there's less ironing. It all adds up to this: you can save 
622 "time and motion" steps each time you wash a load 
of clothes.* Dryers are wonderful! 

Clotheslines are all wett . . . See your Reddy 
Recommended Appliance Dealer 

Umvi-rsily Survey *-^ ^^ *^ 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 




NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 



WiRING SUPPLIES 



Distributors 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 



APPLIANCES 



San Francisco 3, Calif.— 1830 Harrison Street— Phone HEmlock 1-8529 

Santa Rosa, Calif. — 100 Fourth Street — Phone Liberty 5-3593 

San Carlos, Calif.— 1068 .American Street- Phone LYtell 1-0743 

Oakland 8, Calif. — 3521 Chestnut Street— Phone OLympic 3-0416 



F. FRAGOMENI & SONS 

Woolworlh Poultry and Delicatessen 

Corner of Powell and Market Streets 
Son Francisco, California 



THE RECOH 



PUBLIC imm 

OCT 2C^ m} 

^ppRinnfOALDFPT^ 



bay wind. 




An elevator ride in the new Hall of Justice is apt to give one an 
lasy "Big Brother is Watching You" feeling. A carefully modu- 
d voice greets you, captions each floor the elevator stops at, as: 
fth Floor, Police Administration." . . . It's a first for San Fran- 
:o, according to Assistant City Architect Jack Devitt. 
n a petulant mood? Fine, Sir: 
ire with us a small bevy of dis- 
ss .. . Like: Little cars that 
)op niannerlessly in frnt of you, 
,t 'em . . . Jack Tar-type build- 
s, of which San Francisco is 
luiring too many . . . To torid 
,t in October, anathema to Our 
r City . . . Too many would-be 
jervisors, almost three dozen of 
om are clogging the November 
lot and against whom there 
uld be a law, any law . . . Ah. 
, you have other small dislikes 
I would like to develop this in- 
i sort of Dislike Column? Fine! 
iply put them in a stamped, 
'-addressed envelope and drop 
nail box! 

Jrand Jury Foreman Dan Col- 
1 recalling the days of yore — 
t would be the Twenties — 
en, while making a living base- 
hng, he got his first home run 

Johnny Molloy, now with the 






nasion. the Family Rosary Rally. 
i.s .something that will never be 
iDrgotten by the amazing half-a- 
million who gathered to pray to- 
u; ether . . . Incidentally, a special 
^ioff of the hat to Traffic Director 
Tom Zaragoza and his men for 
their superior, precedent-less traf- 
fic handling performance. 

Already we have offered .some 
dislikes. Here, now, is a like, al- 
beit a somewhat unpopular one: 
( Continued on Page 14 I 



DON FAZACKERLEY 
President, Public Utilities Commission 



Commission' youngest . . . He's 
Year ^S^d by the newest member, 42- 



year-old Attorney Tom Stack 



;reation-Park Dept. 

ore the Stock Market crash Col- 

. switched careers, has been in The resignation of Henry Wisdom 
stock business ever since . . . "Tex" Roden from the Utilities 

lich reminds us of another ca- Commission was announced sud- 

r switch: Stock Broker Ernest ^^"'y ^nd uniquely: at a luncheon 
Roden gave for the Utilities peo- 
ple, followed by a letter of resigna- 
tion to the Mayor! 

Changes in the Mayor's office, 
come to think of it, have been of 
a chain raction: first Mark Gerstle 
left the Confidential Secretary post 



West, long time Board of Per- 
Appeals member, was a tailor 
ore the war. 

'UC President Don Fazacker- 
, 44 years old, is no longer the 



;iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

he Magazine of Good Gorernmeril 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Ed.tor .ind Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

)CTOBER • NOVEMBER, 1961 
'OLUME 28 NUMBER 13 



JOSEPH J. ALLEN 

to become Bishop Pike's right- 
hand man, was replaced by Pub- 
licist Bob Smalley . . . Then Execu- 
tive Secretary Joe Allen became 
boss of the S. F. Seals (ice hockey) 
and was succeeded by Old Timer 
John Sullivan . . . And Sullivan's 
Public Service Director ;nb was 
filled by Bob Rockwell who moved 
to City Hall from a dozen years 
PR-ing for the Muni Railway. 

Well, well. Governor Brown and 
Mayor Christopher finally got to- 
gether — and in prayer, yet! This 
was the not inconsiderable accom- 
plishment of a white-haired, Irish- 
faced priest. Father Patrick Pey- 
ton, who brought the two together 
one Saturday afternoon recently in 
Glden Gate Park ... Of course 
there wei'e others present, too. The 



G. W. THOMAS DRAYAGE AND RIGGING CO., INC. 

GENERAL DRAYING - FREIGHT FORWARDING 




114- 14th STREET 

HEmlock 1-9624 

San Francisco 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




C ven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver'guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares arc surprisingly 
low. 

UDrires, 

Limousines, 

Charter Buses 

available 



Depot: 



44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



r. -NOV.. 1961 



VOTE 

BLAKE 

FOR SUPERVISOR 
HE VOTES FOR YOU 



After 35 Years — It's Time for a Change! 

Elect 
SUPERVISOR J. JOSEPH 




SULLIVAN 

CITY ATTORNEY 



MART BANQUET CLUB 

Retirement Luncheons and EMnners 
Fashion Shows - Banquets - Dances 

50 to 1,000 Persons. Privacy - Comfort - Parking 

1355 Market Street UN 1-2820 


OLE GRINI 

The Finest in Watch Repairing 

Trained for more than 10 years by top European Experts 

Adjustments by Electronic Timer 

Specializing in the repair of all makes of Swiss &. American 

Watches 

209 POST STREET, Room 1019 EX 7-2461 


MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

1745 FOLSOM STREET 
San Francisco 3, California 

UNderhill 1-1455 


Pacific Fire Extinguislier Company 

Established 1894 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 
Executive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 
San Francisco 3, California 


MIDBUST & DAHL 

Contractors & Builders 

2266 - 27lh AVENUE 

San Francisco 16, California 

SEabrislit 1-1491 


HEIL EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

STAINLESS STEEL MILK TANKS J 
HYDRAULIC HOISTS - GRAIN BODIES \ 

999 - 16th Street KL 2-3040 . 


4 


THE RECOIU 



WILLIAM KILPATRICK 

President 
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

By DEAN ST. DENNIS 



ATA HEARING in City Hall three months ago several hundred 
r\ persons were astounded when a gray-haired man who looked as 
istinguished as a bank president told them: 

"I am one of the very few heie today who knows what it is like to 
e hungry." 

He said it with anger and a certain sadness, and then cast the lone 
issenting vote as the Civil Service Commission voted 2-1 to sharply 
educe the wages of future City-County laborers, street cleaners, care- 
akeis and groimds keepers. 

Employes at the hearing who 
lay not have known it by merely 
raking at the man in the well-cut 
lue suit found they had a good 
■lend - and a fair one — in William 
jlpatrick, the commission's presi- 
ent. 

The outcome of the voting was 

defeat for William Kilpatrick, 
ut he now says it was only a tem- 
orary setback. 

"I'm almost certain there will be 
more wage cuts. There's even a 
tiance of raising them again. I 
link it's illegal to cut back the 
Uary scales. " 

Kilpatrick said the City Charter 
jquires pay scales comparable to 
lose in private industry. "This cir- 
umvented the charter." 

In KUpatrick's opinion the re- by taking it away from the wage 
uction wa.s engineered by Mont- earner. I did say I was in favor of 
ornery Street (big basiness). The holding the ta.v line — but not in fa- 
llyth-Zellerbach report called for vor of doing it at the ex|>ense .of 
holding or reducing the tax rat<" children." 




WILLIAM KILPATRICK 

President 
S. F. Civil Service Commission 



This was the heart of Kilpat- 
rick's thinking on the wage issue. 

Before the vote, he told the hear- 
ing: "I'm thinking of the kids who 
will go to school hungry if this 
proposition passes." 

In a recent interview, he elabor- 
ated: "I think people are beginning 
to realize that the destiny of the 
United States lies in a full lunch 
pail. This is a bread and butter is- 
sue." 

When wages drop, he said, it 
means a general reduction in the 
standard of living for families of 
affected workers. Not only will 
children go to school hungry — and 
with patched clothing — but the 
smaller income will deprive parents 
of any chance to send their young- 
sters to college. 

The Civil Service Commission's 
job is to set pay scales for all City- 
County employes — from the mayor 
on down. And that dovetails neatly 
with Kilpatrick's other great inter- 
est — the trade union movement. 

But to go back for a moment to 
his comment that he was one of 
few at the hearing who knew what 
hunger was like . . . 

"I left home when I was 16 in 
order to lighten the load for my 
parents. There were six boys and 
two girls in the family. A lot of 



kids did that in those days. You 
would go to school, and all the 
other kids had a lunch to eat, but 
you didn't— unless you had an 
apple you had stolen." 

When he left Seattle, Wash., it 
was the start of years of wander- 
ing. He was, by turns, a stu- 
dent, laborer, logger, constinjction 
worker, and cook. At the same 
time, Kilpatrick grew interested in 
the labor movement. He became a 
member of the Industrial Work- 
( Continued on Page 11) 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 



WILLIAM HOUGHTON 

Importer 

WE SUGGEST YOU REQUEST 

TENNENT'S LAGER 
SCOTCH ALE 
XXX STOUT 

Lager now available in cans at your store 

3448 BALBOA ST. SAN FRANCISCO 21, CALIF. 

SKylinc 2-8360 



Berkeley Hills Chapel 

Serving More Families 

Confidence — Founded on a Trusted Tradition 

You Determine the Cost, Budget Terms. 

One of California's Finest Mortuaries. 

Large Parking Area. Visitors Welcome. 

Pre-need Arrangements — Shipment. 

1600 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, California 

A. Lcc Oder, President Clarence W. Page, Jr.. Secty-Trea. 

John M. Freeman, Gen. Mgr. 

TH. 1-2500 



iCT. -NOV.. 1961 



BLAKE FOR BEHER CARE AT S. F. GENERAL HOSPITAL 



City employees are entitled to 
the flneat treatment at San F"ran- 
eisco General Hospital. Supervisor 
William G. Blake said recently. 

"Up to now we've been able to 
see that civil servants get top 
flight treatment at the hospital." 
Blake continued. "I'm not going to 
buy any changes out there unless 
I'm sure these people will still get 
the best." 

The supei-visor said that "despite 
the dedicated work of doctors and 
nurses the hospital has not pro- 
vided good enough care for indig- 
ent patients. 

"The special ward for city em- 
ployees was established to assure 
that they at least will get the best 
of treatment," Supervisor Blake 
noted. 

He noted that Arthur G. Bunis, 
recently appointed administrator 
of Sa n Francisco Hospital, has 
promised city employees will con- 
tinue to get the best of care. 

"The supervisors intend to hold 
him to that promise." Supervisor 
Blake said. "We will not allow any 
changes in the care of city em- 
ployees which will lower the qual- 
ity of medical treatment." 

"I only wish I could say," Super- 



visor Blake adiieil. "that the qual- 
ity of medical care was so good 
throughout the hospital that wc 
could allow city employees to be 
treated anywhere." 

The supervisor commented, " Po- 
lice and firemen and others en- 
gaged in hazardous woik need the 
assurance of proper medical treat- 
ment if they are to do their very 
best." 

Supervisor Blake has a long re- 
cord of supporting increased bene- 
fits for city employees. During his 
five years in office Blake has sup- 
ported pay increases for policemen, 
firemen, classified, and unclassified 
employees. 

The 41-year-old supervisor grew 
up in the Marina and attended Pa- 
cific Heights Grammar School. He 
owns the Franklin Machine Works 
which is engaged in ship repair 
work. 

Supervisor Blake, who was ap- 
pointed to the board by Mayor El- 
mer Robinson, is one of three in- 
cumbent supervisors seeking re- 
election this year. 

Cyril Magnin, head of the Port of 
San Francisco, is general campaign 
chairman of Supervisor Blake's 
campaign. 



CARAVAN LODGE 

Visit the Newly Decorated SABRE ROOM 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE -RESTAURANT 

601 Eddy Street San Francisco Phone PR 6-1380 

A&BLaDew Engineering Jnc. 

Designers and Installers ot 

Automatic Fire Protection Equipment 



J5 DORM AN AVE. 



MI. 8-8585 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE LOWRIE PAVING CO., INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Grading - Paving - Underground Construction 

Main Office and Yard 

174 SAN BRUNO ROAD SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

PUza 5-8484 JU 3-3574 

San Francisco Yard 

2170 Oakdale Axe., San Francisco 24 MI 7-6000 

R. J. KILROY, Supcrinlendenl 



PHTRINI PLAZA 



FALLETTI 

and I 

BALDOCCHI 

Flf^ER FOODS 



phone Jordan 7-0976 



fulton and masonic 



STFF I 
FRANK C. BORRMANN 

SUPPLY CO. 

Steel for All Purposes 

815 Bryant St. at 6th MArket 1-306:] 

San Francisco 3, Calif. 

REASONABLE RATES 
MRS. ATHERLEY 

LICENSED GUEST HOME 

Doctor's References — Special Diets 
Excellent Food and Care — Near Blind and Senile Welcome 



2407 Lincoln Way 
LO 4-6936 



THOMAS THOMASSER 

WINES & SPIRITS 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
LO 40180-2 

SCAVENGERS' PROTECTIVE ASSN., INC. 

Contractors for the removal of Garbage, Rubbish and Waste Paper 

2550 MASON STREET EX 2-3859 SAN FRANCISCO 1 1 

Stores - Offices ■ Basements - Yards - Warehouses Cleaned 

Free Eitimatcs on Atty Special Clean Up Job 



THE RECORI 



Around and About 



By WHIT HENRY 

^Y WIFE AND I have just returned from a month's vacation and 
VI. many lemembrances are still fresh in my mind. Interesting people 
id places; sood food and not so good food; mountains, prairies and 
ashores. We flew fi-om here to Chicago and then took a steamer from 
ere to Buffalo, New York. This was a most delightful three days, 
'ter arriving in Buffalo we, of 

urse did the usual sightseeing at ,,,: „. . _. 

„ n 6 Wmona, Mmnesota. There we were 

agara Falls. Certain it is. our , ^ „ •« . ■ tt ,■ 

.. . niet by mv wife s cousm. He lives 

inadian neighbors are gracious ;„ d„j,„ , ^-j ,, . . . j » 

. ,. , . . in Redwood City, but is a student 

sts. All of our viewing of the „, ,,,; o. * m >. ^ ,, 

ii_ ...„„ <■ .u <~. J- J Winona State Teachers College. 

Whilst we were travelling by boat, 
plane, train and bus. he drove our 
car to Minnesota. We visited with 
i-elatives in Winona and Wabasha 



ills was from the Canadian side 
w wonderful it is to think that 
e bridge connecting the United 
ates and Canada at that point is 



own as the Peace Bridge. It most ^^r j. ■,.-~i, i t ^ v« 

" before driving back to California, 

suredly symbolizes in a most 



actical way the amit.v and under- 



opened by the Prince of Wales 
1927. 



We went up to Minneapolis 
where Mrs. Henry presented an 

mding between the U n i t e d jj „...„,» „ i j 

idea to the Betty Crocker depart- 

ates and Canada. It was formal- „, „, „ ,' -,.,, „ 

ment of General Mills. For many 

years she has been toasting flour 
which she uses when making 
From Buffalo we flew to New gravy; it improves the quality im- 
irk, and then went to Cape Cod measurably and she often won- 
visit with some relatives. Cape deied it it had commercial possi- 
id is different from any part of bilities. She was informed that 
e country that we had ever seen they feel it is a good idea but it 
tore; and it was hot, humid, and tends to spoil if kept for any length 
lightful. And eating fresh lob- of time. If you can figure out a 
;rs cooked on the beach in sea way to preserve it, you can pos- 
iter— well, our mouths water at gibly make a fortune for yourself. 
I recollection of it. Driving west from Minnesota we 
We did the usual sightseeing in came through South Dakota in 
>w York but a highlight there order to visit the Badlands Na- 
ts the Night Club Tour we took, tional Monument. This national 
is is a promotion of the The monument was established in order 
ay Line and I don't hesitate to to presei-ve a singular region that 
:ommend it to you when you next is noted for its weirdly beautiful 
to New York. The tour began landscapes, out standing e.xamples 
th a dinner at the Latin Quarter, of erosion, and remains of prehis- 
Jlowing the floor show, which torical animals. It is the most dra- 
;ted nearly two hours and was matic exemple of the wearing away 
lellent, we were taken to The of land that is poorly protected by 
m in Greenwich Village where vegetation. Probably the first white 
were well entertained; thence men to see the Badlands were 
the Lexington Hotel and the Ha- French- Canadian trappers in 
.iian Room Revue. The price in- search of beaver. The national 
ided drinks, tips, transportation monument contains ancient re- 
i at no time were we asked to mains which indicate that Indians 
aid any more money. roamed over much of the area. 
iVe gave up going to Washington Weapon points, knives, and scrap- 
:ause of the heat; we flew to ers, as well as chips and other 
Icago and then took a train for (Continued on Page 13) 



AZUMAYA CO. 

J,ick Mizono 
853 Golden G.itc Ave. JO 7-0227 



TIN YIN JAN & CO. 

Barbecued Pork and Spareribs 
041 Slockton St. YU 2-3 348 

Murphy's Cleaners & Laundry 

119 PIvmoulh Ave. 
jO 6-2066 

Ettamarie Manufacturing Co. 

Quality Hardwood Knobs 
1253 -16th St. UN 3-6921 



BRINKS 

ARMORED CAR 
SERVICE 



iotial Atti'tition Gi: 
Lisling 



I lo Your 



Florence E. Munson 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 
3136 Geary Boulevard SK 1-6014 



Francisco 18 



PR 5-4806 



REGAL PALE 
BREWING CO. 



Regal Select 

Breived for Superior Taste 

San Francisco, California 

DUGGAN'S FUNERAL SERVICE 

3434 - 17th STREET - HE. 1-4900 - SAN FRANCISCO 
For East Bay SC San Rafael, ask Operator for ENterprise 1-1012 

COLONIAL FLORIST 

GRACE and PETE BRIA 

Floral Designs - Cut Flowers - Weddings— Our Specialty 

Flowers for All Occasions 

1150 HILLSIDE BLVD. PL 5-2556 COLMA, CALIF. 

M and M Express & Nisei Movers 

Careful ■ Competent Service 

George Taragawa 

116 DOWNEY STREET LO 4-4124 

SCULLY DRUG CO. 

Owl Rexal Drugs - Franchised Dealer 

136 GEARY STREET 
SUtter 1-3090 San Francisco 8, California 

170 Fulton Street - 948 Market Street - 2598 Mission Street 

BENZIGER BROS., INC. 



CHURCH GOODS - RELIGIOUS GIFTS 
RELIGIOUS BOOKS 



758 Mission St. 



SU 1-5159 



T. -NOV.. 1961 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Unll MA 1-0163 

Georpo Christopher, Mayor 

John n. Sulivan. Kxocutive Secretary 
Hnhert Snialley. Confidential Secretary 
MarKaret Smith, Personal Secretary 
,Tohn Ty. Mnntz, Administrative Assistant 
Roliert noikweli. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

23S Citv Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P,M. 
Pr. Charles A. Ertola, President, 

;SS Columbus Ave. 
William c. Blake, BO Polsom St, 
,loseph M, Ca.'iev, 2S2S Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Pohhs, SSI California St, 
,Tohn ,T. Fcrdon, 15^ Monteromery St. 
,T,nmcs T,. Hallev, S70 Market St. 
Clarissa Slinrtall McMahon, 70S Market St. 
I'.l.T 'rniii.Tns. SO Sin Ttafael Way 
.Ins.ph v.. Tinnev. 2.=;i7 Mission St, 
,T. .Tosenh Sullivan 111 Sutter St. 
■Icsse C. Coleman, 25 Taylor St. 

Robert ,T. Polan. Clerk 

T,lllian M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named fir.st) 
Commercial Sc Industrial Development — ^ James J. 

Sullivan. Dlake, McMahon 
County, State and National Affairs — Perdon. Casey, 

Halley 
Kducation, Parks and Recreation — Rolph, Blake, J. 

Joseph Sullivan 
Finance, Revenue and Taxation — Halley, Ferdon 

Zlrpoli 
Judiciary, Tjegislative and Civil Service — Dobbs 

Casey, Rolph 
Police — Casev, Dobbs, James J. Sullivan 
Public BuildinRS, Lands and City PlanninK — J 

Joseph Sullivan, Dobbs, James J. Sullivan 
Public Health & W^elfare — Zirpoli, Halley, McMahon 
Public Utilities— McMahon, Perdon, Zirpoli 
Streets and Hishwavs — Blake, Rolph, J, Joseph 

Sullivan 
Rules— Ertola, Dobbs, Halley 



ASSESSOR 

101 Citv Hall 
Kuss.ll I.. Wnlden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

200 Citv Hall 
Dicn R. Holm 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

617 MontKomery St. 
Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

700 Monteomery St, 
Edward T, Mancuso 
SHERIFF 

SSI Citv Hall 
Matthew C, Carberry 
TREASURER 

110 City Hall 
John J, Goodwin 



KL. 2-1910 
HE 1-1S22 
EX 7-0500 
EX 2-1535 
HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR. JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor, City Hall UN 1-8552 

H A. VanDerZee, Presiding Gerald S, Levin 

Raymond J, Arata Francis McCarty 

Carl H. Allen John B, Moiinarl 

Byron Arnold Edward Molkenbuhr 

Walter Carpeneti Clarence W, Morris 

C, Harold Caulfleld Harry J, Neubarth 

Melvyn I. Cronin Edward P. O'Day 

Preston Devine Charles S. Peery 

Norman Elkington George W. Schonfeld 

Timothy I. Fitzpatrlck William F, Traverso 

Joseph Karesh Alvin E, Weinberger 

Joseph M. Cummins, Secretary 

480 City Hall UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor, City Hall KL 2-3008 

John W, Bussey, Presiding Clarence Linn 

Albert A, Axelrod William O'Brien 

Robert J. Drewes Raymond O'Connor 

Andrew J. Eyman LenoreD, Underwood 

Clayton W. Horn James J. Welsh 

Lcland J. Lazarus George B. Maloncy 

James M. Cannon, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-3008 

A. C, MoChesney, Jury Commissioner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

104 City Hall KL 2-3008 

James M, Cannon, Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-S552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
Daniel J. Collins, Foreman 
Sydney W, Hopkins, Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan, ConsullinE Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St. YU 6-2950 

John D. Kavanaugh, Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan, Chairman, 60 Sansome St. 
Ravmond Blosser. 6.S1 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew P. Connolly, 39(1 Fremont St. 
William Moskovitz, 5030 Geary Blvd. 
Robert A. Pcaliodv, 456 Post St. 
Adolph L. Pierotti, 240 Upland Drive 
Prank Ratto, 526 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5740 

Thomas P. Strycula, 

Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 

JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N, Buell, Chairman, 445 Bush St, 
Mrs, Fred W, Bloch, 3712 Jackson St, 
Rev, John A, Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave, 
Jack Goldberger. 240 Golden Gate Ave, 
Thomas J, Lenehan, 501 Haight St, 
Rev. James B, Plynn, 1825 Mission 
Rev, Hamilton T, Boswell, 1975 Post St, 
Miss M.vra Green, 1362 - 30th Ave, 
Dr. Philip R, Westdahl, 490 Pest St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harr,v D, Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean, 

940 - 25th St, N,W,, Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-01G3 

Donald W, Cleary 
Hotel Senator. Sacramento, during .Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin HB 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P,M. 

Harold L, Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush SL 

Bernard C, Begley. M.D„ 450 Sutter St, 

.Mrs, Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St, 

Nell Sinton, 1020 Francisco St, 

John K, Hagopian, Mills Tower 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson, 2835 Vallejo SL 

William B, Knuth, S, F, State College 

Joseph Esherick. 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President. California Palace Legion of Honor 
President. City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 
Louis Mark Cole. 1958 Vallejo St, 
James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 
Gardner W, Mein, 315 Montgomery St, 
Mrs, Charles B, Porter. 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy, Director of Plannini; 

Thomas G, Miller. Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall HE 



Meets 



Thu 



sday 



at 4 P.M. 



HE 1-2 



Wm. Kilpatrick, President, 827 Hyde St, 
Richard C, Ham, 200 Bush St. 
Hubert J. Sober, 155 Montgomery St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 

DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret,). Director 
.\lex X. McCausland. Public Information Officer 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-4 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 
170 Fell St. 

Mrs. Claire Matzger, President. 3550 Jackson St. 

Mrs. Lawrence Draper. Jr.. 10 Walnut St. 

Adolfo de Urioste. 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Edward Kenimitt. 601 Polk St. 

Samuel Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 

Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 351 California St. 

Elmer F, Skinner, 220 Pell St. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt, of Schools and Set 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 1-8 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P,M, 

Bert Simon, President, 1350 Polsom St, 

Dr, Peter Angel, 1S67 - 15th Ave, 

Philip Dindia, 536 Br.vant St, 

William P. Murray, Chief of Department 

Carl P. Kruger, Deputy Chief 

AVm. P. Lindecker. Asst. Chief. Adm. 

Wm. H. Gilmore. Asst. Chief. Spec. Servie.-s 

Henry A. Lindecker. Asst. Chief. Div. Tniinin 

Albert E. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy, Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

61 Grove St, HE 1-2 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P,M, 

Donald J, MeCook, President. 220 Montgomery SI 

George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 

Donald M. Campbell, M,D,, 977 Valencia St, 

Frank J, Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave, 

Thomas W, McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Robert E, Hunt, Claims Supervisor 
Lyle J, O'Connell, Executive Director 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St, I'l; ::-5 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A,iM. 

Jacob Shemano, 988 Market St,. Chairman 
Al P. Mailloux, 200 Guerrero St. 
Charles R, Greenstone, 2 Geary St, 
Solomon E. Johnson, 704 Market St. 
Charles J. Jung, 622 Washington St, 
John W, Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

536 Golden Gate Ave, I'l: I'-l 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 
John E.- Sullivan, Chairman, 69 West I'ortjl 
Arthur S. Becker, 761 - 34th Ave, 
Donald Magnin, 77 O'Farrell St, 
G. Baltzer Peterson, 2910 Vallejo St, 
David Thomson, 1842 Jefferson St, 

Vining T, Fisher, General Manager 

Thomas J, O'Toole, Secretary 



ERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 
227 City Hall UK 1-2121 

Meets every Wednesday nt S:00 P.M. 

Illlam H. H. Pavls. President, 984 Folsum St. 
Max Mooro, .'lilS Potrero Ave. 
orge (Illlln. 40ni - intli Ave. 
irence J. Wnlsh. 2450 - 17th St. 
■nest T.. West, 2fi5 MontRnmery St. 
J. Edwin Mntlox, Secretary 

• LICE COMMISSION 
Hall of Justice SU 1-2020 

Meets every Monday at 5:00 P.M. 

irold R MoKiniion. President. 255 California St. 

lUl A. BIsslnKCr. P.O. Box 2442 

lomns J. Mellon, .lOO First St. 
Thomas CahHI, Chief of Police 
Alfred .1. Nelder, l")eputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas ZaraKOia, Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel McKlem. Chief of Inspectors 
1,1. Wni. J. O'Hrlen. Commission Secretary 
Capt. John T. nutler. Department Secretary 

JBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Tuesday each month at 4 P.M. 
Lee Vavurls, President. OOn Oeary St. 
hn M. nransten. CCS - 3rd .'St. 
. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 
ise M. Fanucchl. 1445 Stockton St. 
jrearet GIrdner. 1360 Iximhard St. 
hn E. Oiirlch. 300 MontRomery St. 
)V William Turner, 1C42 Broderlck St. 
rs. J. Henrv Mohr, 2 Castenada Ave. 
Ilton K. I,enetlch. 1G55 Polk Street 
bert E. Schwabacher, Jr., 100 Montgomery St. 
lomas W. S. Wu, D.D.S.. 1111 Stockton St. 

William R. Holman. Librarian 

Frank A. Clarvoe, Jr., Secretary 



;blic utilities commission 

287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
)n FaEackerley. President. SBl Howard St. 
uart N. Greenberg, 765 Folsom St. 
•orge F. Hansen. 215 Market St. 
lomas P. White, 400 Brannan St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood. Manager of Utilities 

James J. Finn. Secretary to Commission 



HE 1-2121 



PL, e-0500 



and General 



Bureaus and Departments 
:COunts. 2S7 City Hall 

George Negri, Director 
rport, San Francisco International, S. F. 

n.lfc.rd Brown. Manager 
stch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. 

Oral L. Moore, Chief Engi 
Manager 
iinicipal Railway, 049 Presidio Ave. Fl 6-5ii5l) 

Vernon \V. Anderson, General Manager 
srsonnel «. Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
jblic Service, 2S7 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
ater Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-700(1 

James H. Turner, General Manager 

UBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St. EX 7-COOO 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays each month 
at 9 A.M. 
Icholas A. I,oumos, President. 220 Montgomery St. 
rs. John J. Murray. 1306 Portola Drive 
'llliam P. Scott, Jr.. 249 Natoma St. 
icqueline Smith. 2015 Steiner St. 
rank H. Sloss. 351 California St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Eulala Smith, Secretary 

ECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK l-4.S6fi 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 

'alter A. Haas, Sr., 98 Battery St„ President 

eter Bercut, 1 Lombard St. 

:ar>- Margaret Casey. 532 Mission St. 

niliam M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

r. Francis J. Herz, 430 Sutter SL 

:r». Joseph A. Moore, 2590 Green St. 

>hn F. Conway, Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. KImbell, General Manager 
Paul N. Moore. Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gal.- Ave, f.N :i-7750 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Everett Griffin, Chairman, 465 California St. 
James li. Black. Jr.. I2n Montgomery St. 
James A. Folger. HI. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
Uawrcnce R. Palaclns, 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

93 Grovo Street HE 1-2121 

M.els every Wednesday at ,1 P.M. 
wniiiiii. 'IV r.( . il. President, 2151 - ISth Ave. 
rtiiliii .< l'.ilt'>n. 1 Sansome St. 
.hull. ^ M 1 I.I mill. 120 Montgomery St. 
I>:iiii, I ,\. I'l. z, 2251 - 35th Ave. 
Marliii F. W.Miiuith, 4109 Pacheco 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA l-CCim 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Frederic Campagnoll. President. 300 Montgomery 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Frank A. Flynn, 1549 Noriega St. 
Prentis C. Hale, Jr., 867 Market St. 
George T. Davis, 111 Sutter St. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson, 19 Maywood Drive 
Wilson Meyer, 333 Montgomery St. 
Guido J. Musto. 535 North Point 
Samuel D. Sayad. 35 Aptos Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey, Managing Director 

B. Lawrence George, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2040 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



SU 1-3003 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadei 
Ra.\-niond L. Bozzini. Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 

Frank J. O'Connell. Market Master MI 7-'.i42:l 

CORONER 

650 Merchant St. DO 2-0461 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 



FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk & Recorder HE 1-2121 

Jliutiii J. Jlongan, 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Curntlius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 167 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey. 1117 L'ity Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

L. J. LeOuennec, \B0 Otis 

HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEmlock 1-2121, Ext. 701 
Llovd Conrlch. 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnin, Stockton & O'Farrell 
Frank E. Oman, 557 - 4th St. 
Terence J. O'Sullivan, 200 Guerrero St. 

Bernard A. Cummings, Secretary, 254 City Hall 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

I)r Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr Francis .1. Currv, Assl. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns. Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr Szu T. Tsou. Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

l.'iuis A .Mor:!!!. Superintendent MO 4-15S0 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. 10. .Mbers, Superintendent MI 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blakf, Adni. Superintendent HE 1-2S00 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 

R. Brooks Larter. 

Assistant Director, Administrative 

1,. J. Archer, 

Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 

Accounts, 260 City Hall ME 1 

J. J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 265 City Hall HE 1 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 275 city Mall HE 1 

Itnliirl <". l.„'vv. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army HE 1-: 

A. II. Ekenberg. Superintendent 
Centr.il Permit Bureau, 286 City Hall HE 1-: 

Sliliiev I'ranklln. Supervisor 
Egineerinq. S5:i city Hall HE 1-: 

ciiff.nd J, G.'.riz. City Engineer 
Sewer Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army S 

W:ill.r I',. J'.n.s HE 1-1 

Street Cleaning, 2:!2:', Army St. HE 1-: 

liirnnrd W. Crottv. Superintendent 
Street Repair. 2323 Army St. HE 1- 

F. 11. Brown. Superintendent 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall HE 1- 

Ben Benaa, Purchaser of Supplies 

T. F. Conwav. Chief Assistant 
PurilKiser (it Supplies 
Central Shoos. Smi cjuint 

A, M. FlaluH.v. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harrison Sts. 

J. E. Leary. Supervisor 
Tabulation and Reproduction. Room 50 

George Stanley, Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

93 Grove St. HE 1- 

Phlllp L. Rezos. Director of I'ronerty 
James T. Graham, Audlloriuin Mgr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 City Hall HE 1- 

O. C. Skinner. Jr. 



2121 
2121 
2121 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5C10 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April, June. Oct. 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 
Mr.s. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President, 

2 Pine St. 
Walter E. Buck, President, 235 Montgomery St. 
E. Raymond Armsby, 111 Sutter St. 
Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 
Mrs. C. Tobin Clark, Hou.-e on Hill, San Mateo 
Alexander de Bretteville. 2000 Washington St. 
Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 
Mrs. Bruce Kelham, 15 Argueilo Blvd. 
Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 
William W. Mein, 315 Montgomery St. 
David Pleydell-Bouverie. Glen Ellen, Calif. 
John N. Rosekrans, 333 Montgomery St. 
William R. Wallace. Jr.. 100 Bush St. 
Whitnev Warren, 111 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach. 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 
President, Recreation & Park Commission 

Thomas Carr Howe, Jr., Director 

Capt. Myron E. Thomas, Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Jleets 1st Mon. Jan.. April. June, Oct., 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron, Honorary President, 
Hillsborough 

Richard Rheem. Temporary Dir., 1659 Ru.ss Bldg. 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Miss Louise A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 020 Market St. 

Charles de Young Tbieriot, 1802 Floribunda, Hills- 
borough 

R. Gwin Follia. 3G90 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Heimbucher, 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garret McBnerney. 11. 3725 Washington St. 

Roscoe F. Oakes. 2006 Washington St. 

Joseph O. Tobln. 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burlingame Country Club 

("harles Page. 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Filoll San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcto Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation & Park Commission 
Dr. W:iltcr Hell, Chief Art Consultant 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalplne, Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

43G City Hall HE 1-2121 

Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 

2300 - 16th St. »L\ 1-1700 

Charles W. Friedrlchs, Secretary and Manager 



CT. -NOV., 1961 



J. JOSEPH SULLIVAN 
SEERS CITY AnORNEY'S 
OFFICE AT NOV. ELECTION 

J. Joseph Sullivan, one of the 
most popular supenisors in the 
City's history, will seek the office 
of City Attorney at the November 
city election. 

Sullivan. 51. is a practicing at- 
torney with wide administrative 
experience in city government cov- 
ering a period of 20 years. 

Frequently called a "lawyer's 
lawyer," Sullivan worked his way 
through the University of San 
Francisco as a freight handler on 
the waterfront. After graduating 
"Magna Cum Laude ' in 1932, he 
was admitted to the practice of law 
in 1934 when he received his LLB 
from USF. 

An active attorney since then, 
Sullivan was a member of the Uni- 
versity of San Francisco law school 
faculty for 15 years. Interestingly, 
his opponent in the campaign for 
city attorney was one of his stu- 
dents. Sullivan was admitted to 
practice before the United States 
Supreme Court in 1940. 

His record in civic and veterans 
affairs is an imposing one. 

Sullivan has been attorney for 
the San Francisco Housing Author- 
ity (1938-19411; a member of the 
City Planning Commission (1946); 
a member of the Board of Super- 
visors (1946-1952 and 1959 to the 
present ) ; President, Board of Su- 
pervisors (1948-501; Member, Re- 
tirement Board. City and County 
of San Francisco (1948-501; Direc- 
tor of the County Supervisors As- 



sociation of California. He is Na- 
tional Director of the Navy League 
of the United States; Past Presi- 
dent, Navy League, San Francisco 
Council, and has been a director of 
the Bay Area Rapid Transit Dis- 
trict (1957-59). For three years, 
Supervisor Sullivan served as 
chairman of the San Francisco 
chapter of the National Conference 
of Christians and Jews. 

During his tenure as a member 
of the Board of Supervisors, he 
establised an enviable attendance 
record — 490 regular and special 
Board meetings, with only 33 ab- 
sences, most of these required by 
special navy duty. During this pe- 
riod he has abstained from voting 
due to conflict of interest less than 
a dozen times. 

Presently a captain in the United 
States Naval Reserve, Sullivan was 
on active duty with the Navy from 
1941 to 1945, having spent three 
years on combat sea duty partici- 
pating in 14 major naval battles. 
He holds the Legion of Merit with 
Combat Insgina, the Bronze Star, 
with Combat Insignia, and seven 
other decorations, 

A native son and lifelong resi- 
dent of San Francisco, J. Joseph 
Sullivan comes from a large fam- 
ily. His father, Michael, and his 
mother. Birdie Drummond Sulli- 
van, had seven children; two boys 
and five girls. 

Married in 1935, he and his wife 
Ann are the parents of Judy Ann, 
20, and Mark Joseph, 12. They live 
at 314 San Leandro Way. He is a 
member of the McQuade Post, 'Vet- 
erans of Foreign Wars, and Park- 
side Post, American Legion. 



James L. Vizzard 

ALCX SOURIKOFF, Associalc 

INSURANCE BROKERS 

2»40 JUDAH STREET 

San Francisco 22, California 

Eslablisliiid 1890 

STRENGTH — PERMANENCY 

GOOD REPUTA-nON 



Pho: 



Lombard 6-7741 



H. B. WUey, Jr. 
Termite Control 

140 SADAWA STREET 
JU. 7-3162 



EDDY HOTFX 

PEARLIE MULLINS 
1430 Eddy Streef 
WAInut 1-0165 



Fire - Liability - Life - Auto 

RAYMOND Q. WONG 

INSURANCE BROKER 

Western Life Insurance 
Comp.iny 

818 CLAY STREET 



Bus.: GA 1-J975 



GEORGE L. BURGER 

Wholesale Dealer 

POTATOES 8i ONIONS 

52 Vallejo St. EX. 2-1313 



KOWll'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

We Give 
SuH Green Stamps 

2 Steiner Street MA. 6-0530 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 

Instruments (or Hond Surgery 

Active Hond & Finger Splints 

70- I2»h Street MA. 1-6876 



Seaboard Hotel 

"'Hear Everytliing" 

Mr. y Mrs. James Grayson, 

Mgr.-Owncr 

226 Emborcadero DO 2-9463 



Mel-Williams Company 

Canned & Frozen Food Services 

15 California Street San Francisco 

Telephone: EXbrook 2-7366 



JOHN F. MORRISON 

REAL ESTATE 
New Address Premium Realty 
1448 Haight St. HE. 1-5775 



Rolando Lumber Co. 

301 BERRY STREET 
SU 1-6901 



CASTRO STREET 
GARAGE 

Coy Madscn, Owner 

Complete Automotive Service 

and Repairs 

557 CASTRO, near 19th St. 
UN 1-9368 



Victoria Pastry Co., Inc. 

Italian and French Pastries 
and Confections 

Cakes for All Occasions 

1362 STOCKTON STREET 

SU 1-2015 



Bell Typewriter Co. 

Typewriter Sales 8C Service 

Fast ■ Dependable ■ Guaranteed 

131 - 8th STREET 

UN 3-2261 



MARKET GARAGE 

Complete Automotive Service 

Bill Lightncr, 0»Mer 

38 - 8th STREET 

UN 1-3085 



North Beach French- 
Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



G & Z AUTO UPHOLSTERY 

Scat Covers ■ Cus\\\ons ■ Tops 
Boat Upholstery 

2727 Geory Blvd. JO 7-264* 



Cornelius Murchison 

BOAS PONTIAC 

New & Used Cors 
Geary at Broderick 



Sunshine Rest Home 

24 Hour Care for Ambulatory 

Guests — Men 6? Women 

Elevator Service — Anne Murray 

719 - 36th Ave. SK I-770S) 



Custom-Aire 
Products 

Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 
Mfgrs. of Forced Air - Gas 
Fired Heaters & Wall Furnaces 
Air Conditioning J 

600 Indiana Street 
VA 6-7171 



CHINESE WORLD 

736 Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 



17th & BALBOA GROCERY 

Groceries • Produce • Wine • Liquor 
1601 Balboa St. SK 1-3300 

DUO-FAST California Co. 

310 JACKSON STREET 
YU 6-0173 



Bayshore Farmers Market 

Fresh Produce 
300 Bayshore Blvd. MI 7-1806 



Chevron Service 

Roy L. Strong 
1799 Ocean Avenue DE 3-9945 

Phil Egan 

Watch e Clock Repairing 
511 Valencia St. HE 1-8753 



THE RECOR 



William Kilpatrick 

(Continued from Page 51 
of the World - the so-called 
jblies generally credited with 
ng the groundwork for much 
odays strong unionism, 
or Kilpatrick, two memories 
id out from these early years: 
saw a mob lynch a union organ- 
; and he was once forced to run 

gantlet of an anti-union mob 

ed with clubs. 

1 the early 1920s, Kilpatiick 

a cook in Salem, Oregon, and 
ded to help organize his fellow 
kers. 

[ was the first picket ever to 
li a street in Salem and I organ- 
a imion there." He said he 
led down a bribe that was of- 
d in an effort to get him to stop 
union activities. "I was black- 
ed in Salem after that." He left 
San Francisco in 1925 and has 
I here ever since, 
ilpatrick woiked as a chef here 

many years. One event, as 
h as any other, helped push 
into the public eye. During 
rid War II he refused to serve 
sen'ice personnel food which. 
is opinion, was unfit for hiuiian 
iumption. He took the matter 
vith the Board of Health and as 
esult hearings followed which 
ited a fui'or. A numbei' of res- 
•ants promptly raised their 
tary standards. Kilpatrick's 
tition soon shifted to another 
t. 

Phe war was on and you 
dnt get an apartment for love 
loney." When Federal rent con- 
; were taken off, rents zoomed 
ard, and Kilpatrick's answer 

to organize the Tenants Coun- 
designed to bridge the gap be- 



tween the organized and unorgan- 
ized tenants of San Francisco. It 
had 27,000 members and worked 
effectively to keep rents within 
reach of lower income groups. "It 
was the most potent political 
group ever organized in San Fran- 
cisco." 

Kilpatrick said this was one of 
the favorite memories of the coun- 
cil: 

"We had a hearing in City Hall 
and people were packed in the hall- 
ways and clear outside into the 
street. The police were trying to 
move some of them away. I told a 
woman who was being hustled 
away by the police that they had 
no right to keep her out of City 
Hall. She hit a policeman over the 
head with her purse. It was a hell 
of a militant group." 

Kilpatrick became an official in 
the Cooks, Pastry Cooks and As- 
sistants Union 18 years ago. He 
first was elected recording secre- 
tary, then business agent. He now 
is secretary of the union — which is 
big, prosperous and has more than 
3,700 members. 

Before he was appointed to the 
Fire Commission here in 1957, he 
had doubts about union officials 
sei-ving in government. "I thought 
no labor official should accept ap- 
pointment because his loyalties 
would be more or less divided. I 
thought that you couldn't support 
two masters." 

After sei-ving on the Fire Com- 
mission, and then being appointed 
to a six-year term on the Civil 
Sei-vice Commission, he found that 
no one has tried to influence his 
thinking. "I've called them the way 
I think they're right." 

The Civil Service Commission 
"has been a challenge ... a real 
pleasure. Next to the Board of 



Education, It is the most Important 
agency in the city. It's vital ... a 
great insight into the functioning 
of city government. " 

He also found time to serve on 
the Democratic Central Committee 
here, a fair employment practices 
group, a Bonds for Israel drive, a 
muscular dystrophy organization, 
the National Committee for the 
Visually Handicapped and as chair- 
man of the Sei-vice League Com- 
mittee for Retarded Children and 
other civic organizations. 

"But I doubt if I ever retire, " 
said Kilpatrick, who keeps up the 
brisk pace despite a heart attack 
suffered in 19.57. 

All this activity has brought him 
a wide variety of friends — from 
low-paid laborers to a man who be- 
came President. Kilpatrick met 
John F. Kennedy here shortly be- 
fore the Democratic convention in 
1960 — and had a long talk with 
him. "He was a good listener," Kil- 
patrick recalled. 

Kilpatrick likes to fish, and this 
also has widened his circle of 
friends. A little more than a year 
ago, he was fishing in Oregon when 
a man on the other side of the 
stream struck up a conversation. 

"He was very friendly," Kilpat- 
rick said. "We fished down the 
liver for quite a ways and he said: 
'I wish I had hip boots so I could 
get out in the deep water'. I kept 
thinking he looked familiar. Later 
that day it came to me. It was Ad- 
lai Stevenson." 

This month, Stevenson comes to 
San Francisco to give an off-the- 
record briefing on United Nations 
affairs to a number of civic lead- 
ers. One of them will be William 
Kilpatrick. 



CHESTER AND 
SONS 

Tune-ups 

Motor Rebuilding 

Automatic Transmissions 

Braite Service 

629 Gough Street 
WA 1-5355 



COEN 
COMPANY 

OIL & GAS BURNERS 
Main Office and Plant 

40 Boardman Place 

l!N 3-2880 



THE VILLA 



Established 192} 

Fully Equipped to render 
Hospital Care 

Joseph Sarlo, Prop. 

130 VALE STREET 

PL 5-0411 Daly City 





GEORGE W. 


REED & 


CO. 






Masonry 


Contractor 






«4 


CLEMENTINA STRET 




YU 


2-4846 




M(K>SE VAN & STORAGE 






Local and Long 


Distance Moving 




834 


DIAMOND STREET 




AT. 


2-8990 




AL MOSSMAYER, Mgr.Onner 







"Blessings to the City Employees and tlieir Families" 
UNITY TEMPLE 

Reverend Mary Scully 
1164 Market Street San Francisco 

NEW MISSION HEATING & PLUMBING 

M. HOCHEDE, General Manager 

Installations -Repairs 
Ventilating - Sheet Metal Work 

FREE ESTIMATES 

nil HILLSIDE BLVD. WY 2-4800 



r.-NOV., 1961 



Glover Pet & Supply Shop 

Complete Line of 

PETS a; SUPPLIES 

17-2 Haight Street BA. 1-5730 



GARCIA & CO. 
Ornamental Iron Works 



1438 Egbert St. 



JU. 7-5555 



MIKE'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

Repairs ■ Tune-up - Tires 

Batteries - Accessories 

Pick-up &. Delivery 

Mike Inouye 

1999 Pine St. WA. 1-2825 



Compliments 

of 

A 

FRIEND 


WALSH REXALL DRUGS 
OWL REXALL DRUGS 



2 Conrenient Locations 
Market at 3rd EX. 2-5469 

Mission at 16th UN. 1-1004 



Gary's Auto Service 

Touring - AAA Auto Assn. Service 
General Auto Repairs 

3475 CHAMPION ST. 
KE 6-2165 Oakland, Calif. 



FOX HOSTESS HOUSE 

— Catering — 

Weddings - Social Gatherings 

3255 Balboa SK. 2-0820 



BENTLEY ENGINEERS 

405 Sansome St. San Francisco 
384 First Street Oakland 



Lew Nelson's 



Mobile Service Stations 

3rd & South Park DO. 2-6680 

3rd & 18th Sts. HE. 1-9275 



"MAC - DAVID" 
RADIO & TV SERVICE 

1051 Polk St. TU. 51750 



JIM'S UNION SERVICE 

3350 Alemany Blvd. DE. 3-6534 



RE-ELECT 



LENORE D. 



UNDERWOOD 




warn 

SERVICE • INTEGRITY 
AND DEPENDABILITY 

Endorsed by: 

Veterans Political Council 

Civic League of Improvement Clubs 

AFL-CIG^s COPE 

Lafayette Club 

Chinese American Citizen's Alliance 

Steuben Society Unit No. 79 

Columbus Civic Club 

ILWU Local No. 15 

Union Labor Council 

CITIZENS COMMITTEE FOR 
JUDGE UNDERWOOD 



Let-George-Do-It 

GEORGE P. SCHMITT 

Heating & Plumbing Contractor 

3281 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 10, California 



Bus. VA. 6-0840 Res. DE. 3-5381 

ANDY'S AUTO-GLASS 

Cut and Installed 
Open Sat. Till Noon 
5236 - 3rd STREET 
San 



Bauer En^ravin^ Co. 

PHOTO-ENGRAVERS & ARTISTS 

Phone HEmlock 1-1892 

410 Fourteenth Street 

San Francisco 



Prinio R. Repetto 

General Insurance - Real Estate 

Notary 

321 Columbus Ave. 

EXbrook 7-1051 - 7-1052 

San Francisco 1 1 



TELEPHONE MARKET 

Groceries, Produce, Beer & Wine 

2895 PINE STREET 

JOrdan 7-9679 



Fort Funston 
Open House 

Mr. and Mrs, San Francisco and 
children will be guests of the Citi- 
zens Committee for Fort Funston 
Park Bonds at a gala "open house" 
at Fort Funston itself on Sunday, 
October 29, from 10:00 a,m. to 
5:00 p,m. 

"We want voters to see for 
themselves what choice real estate 
and exciting park and recreational 
facilities Fort Funston's purchase 
will provide by their Yes vote on 
Proposition B at the November 
elections." Committee Chairman 
Harold I. Zellerbach said. 

Fort Funston's gates will be open 
to the public literally for the first 
time since it was acquired for 
military purposes in the Spanish- 
American War — 1898 to be exact. 
Special permission was granted to 
the Citizens Committee for staging 
the outdoor "pen house" at Fort 
Funston by General Services Ad- 
ministration, with the cooperation 
of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment, San Francisco Recre- 
ation and Park Department, San 
Francisco Real Estate Depart- 
ment, and the Municipal Railway. 

Proposition B calls for an ex- 
penditure of $1,100,000 to purchase 
Fort Funston's acreage from the 
Federal Government at one-half its 



appraised value. If the bonds i 
the land is scheduled to be sold 
public auction and Fort Funstc 
hiking trails, picnic grounds, fl 
ing beaches, riding paths, and 
stunning panoramic vistas of oct 
and city will be lost forever. 

Because of the lack of park 
and road access, the Citizens Cc 
mittee has arranged with the Mt 
cipal Railway to run shuttle bu 
from Fleishhacker Zoo into F 
Funston and back to the Zoo t 
minus. No private automob; 
will be permitted within Fort F 
ston on that day. 

As an added attraction, the C 
fornia Historical Society will t 
nish a group of trained guides 
conduct visitors through Fort F 
ston's 116 acres of beaches, dui 
wooded glens, and massive c 
Crete emplacements, dismanl 
after World War II. 

One of the highlights of 
guided walks through Fort F 
ston will be a tour of the nes 
100 -yard -long underground c 
Crete corridors and powder chi 
bers comprising the buried m 
of Battery Davis, described as 
of the finest potential atomic i 
out shelters available in the 1 
Area. For the one day, a gei 
ator and electric lights will be 
stalled so visitors may inspect 
gigantic underground fortificati 
which supplied the two 16-i 
Naval rifles which guarded 
Golden Gate. 



HAYES VALLEY AQUARIUM 

Comfhic Line of Tropical F,sh 
anii Eqinpment 

327A Hayes Street UN. 3-3483 


BELL BAZAAR 

Stationery - Greeting Cards ■ To 
3030 - 16th Street UN. 1-28 


The Brayton Hotel Apartment 


BAYLACQ LAUNDRY 

FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Delivery Service 

116 Clement St. SK 1-0971 


50 Turk St. GR. 4-4811 


lohn L. Vfestlund & Son, Inc. 

Custom House Brokers 
Rm. 218, World Trade Center 


WHITE HOUSE 
FRENCH LAUNDRY 

J. p. CASSOU 

2549 Clay St. WEst 1-8073 

San Francisco 15 


EXbrook 7-5744 


NERO'S BEAUTY SALON 

Complete Beauty Service 
1718 Divisadcro St. WA. 1-18 


VICTOR'S PIZZA 


Phone VA. 4-9146 

RAY CICERONE REALTY 

Realtor 

POTRERO HILL PROPERTIES 

RAY CICERONE, Bro\er 

1542 -20th Street 

San Francisco 


1411 Polk Street TU. 5166 


Coopman Electric Co. 

Dick Coopman 
41 FOURTEENTH STREEl 
MA. 1-8868 San Franci 



WHIT HENRY _ 

(Continued from Page 7 i 
p refuse, are found in numer- 

placos. Indians also brought 
ery into the area on their sea- 
J bison hunts. The Badlands 
! off the principal early travel 
es, and hence they had only a 
)r role in the colorful episodes 
;h flgined so greatly in the set- 
ent of the West. Hundreds of 
s before you reach the Bad- 
s the highways are dotted with 
s that advertise the Wall Drug 
e. The town of Wall, South Da- 
„ is on U. S. Highway 16 near 
western portal to the Badlands 
. The Wall Drug Store is a col- 
1 spot and one of the things 

brought it to the attention of 
travelling public was its fea- 

of giving free ice water to the 
ity traveler. They also have a 
;e shop where one can purchase 
alobingers. Another feature is 

coffee is still only a nickel; I 
at a nickel. That is five cents. 
If a dime, the twentieth part of 
illar. If you visit the Badlands 
t fail to visit the Wall Drug 
e. 

rom the Badlands we went to 
lit Rushmore. In my next col- 
I I'll give you infonnation on 
inspiring national memorial. 
1 through Colorado, Utah and 
ada, with stops, naturally in 
rks and Reno. More of that in 
next, also. 

was a wonderful trip and we 
already planning another; it is 
sant to day dream, isn't it? 

one of the best things about 
elling is coming home, and San 
icisco is home. 



Raniorino 
Richfield Service 

'as • Oil • Lubrication • Tune-ups 
98 Evans Ave. VA 6-9857 

;radley camera 

Sales • Service ■ Budget Prices 

1126 MARKET ST. 

HE 1-7476 

CUNIO BAKERY 

Bianchi & Co. 

52J GREEN STREET 
EX 2-4969 

arje & Sam's Cleaners 

lundry S: Alterations of All Kind> 

Expert Dyeing 

Phone MArket 1-1972 

381 GUERRERO STREET 



ARLENE'S CLEANERS 

PersottalUcd Ctcatting & Laundry 
Servicv 

Under the Supervision of Owner 

Gertrude Ward 

2017 CHESTNUT STREET 

WA 2-1410 



HENRY & GILES 
SIGNAL SERVICE 

Complete Automotive Service 

Lee Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

701 LOMBARD STREET 

GR 1-8544 



SIISALOA 
Mexican Cantina 

Restaurant 
Continuous Entertainment 
1416 POWELL STREET 

SU 1-9624 



Greetings 

DIVISION 
1225 



PAQUEHE & MAURER 

Structural Engineers 

417 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 5 
EXbrook 2-1619 



CONSTRUCTION 
AGGREGATES 
CORPORATION 

Telephone DOuglas 1718-9 

503 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 5. Calif. 



BIG SAVE 

SERVICE STATION 

Arthur Carr, Mgr.Ovner 



1 une-ups 

Complete Lubrication 

Mechanic on Duty 

1800 TARAVAL STREET 

LO 4-2080 



A A SALVAGE CO. 

Metals of AH Kinds 



David Harris, Mgr.-Owner 

1375 EVANS AVENUE 
VA 4-8734 



HOTEL k FRANCE 
Keslaiirant Ik Bar 

Now owned and operated by 
Claude Berhguet 

780 BROADWAY 
GA 1-6410 



HILL & CO. 

Realtor 

2107 UNION STREET 
WA 1-3040 



ROBERTA'S 

Dressmaking ■ Alterations 

2477 SACRAMENTO ST. 

FI 6-4616 



ED LINGSCH 

Realtor 

3232 MISSION STREET 
MI 8-1516 



Ted's Auto Body & 
Fender Repair 

Free Estimates 
1570 Waller St. MA 1-1400 



M&M FOODS 

Mary Morley, Prop. 

300 CHENERY STREET 

JU 5-9939 



MABEL MINTON 
GUEST HOUSE 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9253 



Automatic Home 
Laundry Service 

for service CALL YU 2-0634 
60 CLARA STREET 



FARMERS 

INSURANCE 

GROUP 

Bert Wcibic, District Manager 

2141 LOMBARD STREET 
JO 7- 1 860 



ED'S COFFEE SHOP 

Breaktasl ■ Lunch 
Short Orders 



D. W. WOOD 

510 BRANNAN STREET 
San Francisco 



DoNut Bowl 

lOth AVE ac GEARY BLVD. 
SK 1-6454 



Fred & Jaimie's 
Barber Shop 

Distinguished Hair Culling 

6 Barbers 

3400 Geary Blvd. EV 6-9894 



Scissor Fritz 
Beauty Salon 

1910 OCEAN AVENUE 
JU 6-2225 



Curley's TV 
Sales & Service 

915 COLE STREET 

LO 4-5774 



Catherine Modelo's Shop 

Look Your Best for Less 

Complete Line of 

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 

Light Dressmaking & Alterations 

216 Pierce St. MA 1-4743 



Presidio Travelodge 

Quiet Location at Entrance to 
Presidio 

TV • Telephones - AAA Approved 

255 Lombard St. WE 1-8581 



Jim's Flying A Service 



Complete Automotive Service 

JIM BURKHEAD, New Owner 

695 Oak Street MA 1-8118 



r.-NOV., 1961 



BAY WENDOW 

(Continued from Page 3 1 
We like Civic Center Plaza with 
its fountain which glows so color- 
fully at night. Ah. you don't like 
it? Vou think the fountain looks 
like something going on that 
should not in public ? 

Her name we forget — who 
among us can remember the name 
of the yoimg lady who a couple 
of months ago was selected Miss 
America? — but the quote was a 
masterpiece ( mistresspiece ? ) of 
timelessness : "I'll be interested in 
marriage when the right boy and 
I get together and decide we're 
ready for marriage." 

Questions-sans-answes: Do we 
really want the Presidio changed 
from the never-changing hunk of 
park-like nostalgia that it is? . . . 
Is there anyone else in town who. 
like good Harld Berliner, would 
flatly reject, turn down, put the 
kibosh on a testimonial dinner in 
his honor? . . . Will the Golden 
Gate Bridge Directors ever be the 
subject of laudatoi-y editorials in 
the S. F. press? . . . Will there 
ever be a candidate for Mayor — 
Gene, Harold, Anyone? — who will 
come out foursquare against the 
pigeon blight ? 

It's a pleasure to welcome back 
to San Francisco one of the most 
popular persons ever to labor in 
the local PR vineyard, Larry Mur- 
phy, who has been appointed di- 
rector of the Sound Abatement 
Center at the Aii-port. The job in- 
volves explaining away the nois 
made by jets to neighboring com- 
munities, a sometimes difficult as- 
signment. But our bet's that Lai- 
i-y will make San Bruno and South 
City believe the big birds are sing- 
ing nothing but sweet songs . . . 
H held a top job with TWA in 
Chicago, resigned because he could 
not take the Windy City after too 
many years spent in S. F. 



Absentee Voting to 
Close October 31st 

Chas. A. Rogers. Registrar of 
Voters, reminded voters that all 
absentee voting for the November 
7th Municipal Election will close 
on October 31st. This earlier clos- 
ing date was established by the 
State Legislature to speed up com- 
pile election totals in California. 

Absentee voting is now in prog- 
ress at the City Hall. Voters who 
expect to be away on election day 
may vote on the voting machines 
set up in Room 158. City Hall. 

Paper ballots will be mailed to 
persons physically unable to go to 
their polling places, or to persons 
who are leaving the city and are 
unable to vote now at the City 
Hall. Request must be signed by 
the voter, giving registered ad- 
diess. as well as address to which 
ballot is to be mailed. Mail ap- 
plications must be received by 
5:00 p.m. October 31st. Ballots 
sent by mail must be voted and 
returned to the Registrar no later 
than November 4th. the Saturday 
before election. 



BOB'S 


TAVERN 


Your Ge 


nial Hosts- 


Mr. acM 


rs. Joe Sheid 


1368 Irving St. 


SE 1-9864 



AIR FRANCE 

The World's Largest Airline 

260 STOCKTON ST. 

Tickets and Reservations 

Call YUkon 2-7150 



17th & BALBOA GROCERY 

John Re — Joseph Re 

Groceries - Meats ■ Produce 
Beer - Wnie - Liquor 

l&OI Bolboa St. SK 1-3300 



Civic Center Cleaners 8> Dyers 

specializing in Knits 
LAUNDRY SERVICE 

61 McAllister St. UN. 1-4490 



RAY'S CORNER LIQUOR 

BEER - 'WINE - LIQUOR 
Domestic e# Imported 



506 Valencia St. 



3-6334 



MOBILE RADIO 
ENGINEERS 

1150 LARKIN STREET 
PRospect 6-6166 

Son Francisco 9, California 



'■ 


CARL N. SWENSON CO., INC. 


Contractors 


• 


1095 STOCKTON AVENUE 


Phone CYpress 4-3232 


• 


San Jose 6, California 



EAGLESON 
EXOIXEERS 



615 Sansome Street 



San Franciso 11, California 



DICK CHIN REALTY CO. 

Specializing in 
North Beach & Chinatown Properties 



818 Clav St. 



EX 7-3255 



BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

Spccialisis on fVhecl Alignmenl 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-70; 

Bill Barca San Francis 



THE PUREST WATER IN THE WORLD COMES FROM THE TUOLUMNE RIVER 
WATERSHED IN THE HIGH SIERRA, 167 MILES FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




6IANT WATER PROGRAM 
BAY WINDOW 
JUDGE GERALD S. LEVIN 
WHIT HENRY 



.*'■ *r 



WATER 




HENRY R. ROLPH 



MARINE EXCHANGE 
REELECTS PREXY 

Mcnibeis uf Ihe 112-yeai-old Ma- 
rine Exchange of San Francisco 
have re-elected Henry R. Rolph, 
San Francisco admiralty attorney, 
its president. 

The Exchange has been in the 
forefront of the fight to eliminate 
"red tape" paper work surrounding 
the maritime industry. 

Mr. Rolph has long been one of 
San Francisco's most popular civic 
leaders. 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

BURLINGAME, California 

The LOWRIE 
PAVING CO., Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Grading — Paving 
Underground Construction 



Main Office and Yard 



174 San Bruno Road 
PO 1-2265 



South San Francisco 
JU 3-3574 



San Francisco Yard 

2170 Oakdale Ave., San Francisco 24 MI 7-6000 

R. J. KILROY. Supcrinlendenl 




{save plenty wampum this winter) 

Almost every home "leaks" heat — honest Injun! ■ Somf 
heat slips through loose-fitting doors and windows. About 
16% is lost through window glass. And up to 45% escape! 
through uninsulated ceilings! ■ By weather-stripping anc 
insulating now, you can prevent much of your heat los! 
during the winter months ahead. By keeping draperie! 
drawn and the fireplace damper closed, you can stop stil 
more heat loss. ■ This way you'll have a warm, wonderfu 
wigwam every winter . . . and save heating dollars, too ! 

624-X. 1141 PacificGss andEleetricCompany 



BELL JEWELERS 

Longine, Hamilton & Bulova IValches 

Gifts - Diamonds Pearls - Jade 

Watch, Clock & Jewelry Repair 

715 IRVING ST. MO 1-1080 

Thomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
Lombard 4-0180 

FOSTER AND KLEISER 

DIVISION OF METROMEDIA, INC. 

Outdoor Advertising 

1675 EDDY STREET 
San Francisco 19 



KB 1 19P.? 

I,AN fllANCWSO 

PIJOI c* ■ ■""' 



bay 




VELI., THE NEW YEAR arrivt'd, in spite of everything:, and 
broiiKlit witli it an assortment of g:oodies (and iiere no referenc* 
made to |M>or. ailing, de-Aldernianed and generally be-nigflited 
odie), siieli as new City Attorney Tom O'Connor, wliose induction 

a-slied all attendance records as 

> iLsiially spacious Sup<'r>'isors successor . . . And Dion, looking 
unber was reduced to clothes- back over his 35 star-studded 
set size by the SKO-and then- years in the City Attorney's offie*, 
ne throngs of demonstrative remarked that, given the chance, 
pporters . . . We suspect, how- he'd do it all over again. God bless 
sr highly though Tom is re- 'imi 

rded (after all, a 2 t<i 1 vote of More goodies: Then there are the 
r & people!), that many in the two new supervisors, young and 

; . . Democratic Jack Morrison and 

Roger Boas . . . Roger promptly 
manned his swiftest Pontiac and 
set off to champion the 5c-nde-on- 
Muni cause for San Francisco's 
senior citizens . . . As for Jack — 
who came THAT close to outpoint- 
ing Pete Tamaras as high man on 
the vote-totem pole — he is now 
the second former newspaperman 
(The Chronicle, fourth floor press 
room: meaning Court coverage) to 
make the Board . . . the first was 
Franck R. Havenner, one-time Ex- 





aminer reporter . . . All right, 
News-Call, who are you grooming 
— Dick Chase ? 

Come to think of it, there was 
another supervisor who worked for 
a paper while he was on the Board. 
That was Don Fazackerly — now 
Shopping News publisher — who 
was with The Monitor's advertis- 
ing staff when he was elected in 
1948; it was a record-setting elec- 
tion, for Don was 32 years old at 
the time and the youngest super- 
visor in Board history . . . 

There was another political 
"first" in that year, 1948, when the 
youngest Judge ever to sit on a 
San Francisco bench was appoint- 
ed to the Municipal Court: 38-year- 
old John Molinari . . . Meet him 
now, after 13 statured yeare. Pre- 
siding Judge Molinari of the Su- 
perior Court, one of the most popu- 
lar and respected jurists San Fran- 
cisco has ever had. 

Political goodies galore are in 
store for us this year. Lake: Dem- 



ocrat Gene (who used to be J. Eu- 
gene) McAteer, the State Senator, 
and Republican Supervisor Harold 
Dobbs .squaring off for the non- 
partisan post of Mayor . . . And 
Our George Christopher riding 
hard for the Lieut.-Governorship. 
Allow us to pause now and con- 
template the hilarious situation 
that conceivably could place two — 
that's right, TWO — San Frsmcis- 
I Continued on Page 14) 



TOM OCONNOR 

City Attorney 

lUng mob were present as much 
' that grand old man of law, 
»n Holm, a.s they were for his 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

he Maga;ine oj Good Gorernmeut 

San Frandsco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

DEC. -JAN., 1962 
'OLUME 29 NUMBER 1 



PETRINI PIAZA 



FALLETTI 

and 

BALDOCCHI 

FIISER FOODS 



phone Jordan 7-0976 



fulton and masonic 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Lven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited alt 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entcrtaininR. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Tiikc a Gray Line tour of San 
Trancisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do^cvery year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous drivcr-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 



UDrives, 

Limousines, 

Charter Buses 

available 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
Yukon 6-4000 



C-JAN., 1962 



GIANT WATER PROGRAM 

PUC Moves Ahead on 5!!;ll5,00(MMM) 
Hetch Hetcliy Coiistruetioii Woi-k 

By BILL SIMONS 

WHILE 1961 WAS a year of great decision for San Francisco's 
public-owTied water utilities, this is the year for commencement 
of one of the biggest, most vital, most important construction jobs in 
the City's history. 

The job at hand is the mammoth project of nearly doubling the 
capacity of the famed water supply system that starts at giant Hetch 
Hetchy Resen-oir in the High Sieira. 167 miles from the City. 

Engineering has already started 

on the elements of the program ber ballot. It was designed to a.- 
which will increase the system's complish the urgently needed iiv 
delivery capacity from a present crease of the water system's di - 
180,000,000 gallons daily to 300,000 livery and storage capacity, 
gallons. This will be sufficient to A campaign committee was 
take care of the increasing needs foimed to undertake the some- 
of San Francisco and the Peninsula what complex task of explaining 
and South Bay at least to the year the need for the water bonds to 
1985. the voters. This gi'oup was headed 

Engineering has also started for by Joseph Martin, Jr., former Pi-es- 
the construction of additional wa- ident of the Public Utihties Com- 
ter stoiage in the mountains to mission, and by Cyril Magnin, 
guarantee the ability of San Fran- President of the San Francisco 
Cisco Water Department to sei-ve a Port Authority. 
dependable supply of 400,000,000 The committee was backstopped 
gallons daily to its customers at by the PUC's top water team com- 
least to the year 2015. posed of Manager of Utilities Rob- 

This service area that relies on ert C. Kirkwood, veteran Water 
Hetch Hetchy for a good two- Department General Manager 
thirds of its water, and on local James H. Turner, and the new, 39- 
storage in the Bay Area for the year-old boss of the Hetch Hetchy 
rest, includes all of San Francisco, project. Oral L. Moore. ( But 
most of San Mateo County, parts Moore, who succeeeded Harry E. 
of noi-thern Santa Clara and south- Lloyd, was not new to the pi'oject; 
em Alameda counties. he had been with Hetch Hetchy 

Last year the City's answer to for 12 years.) 
the growing thirst — for water for The campaign ran scared all 
domestic and industrial purposes — year. Even though it had the all- 
of this burgeoning area was in the out support of press, radio, tele- 
provision of an average of some vision, as well as of all the tax- 
170,000,000 gallons daily. It was payers, labor and civic organiza- 
dangerously close to the water sys- tions, there were grave doubts ex- 
tem's delivery capacity of 180,- pressed that it could accomplish 
000,000 gallons. the required two-thirds vote in the 

So a $115,000,000 bond issue — face of off-year election apathy, 
the largest in San Francisco his- the whopping amount ot the pro- 
toi-y — was placed on the Novem- posal — and what the experts fre- 




quently referred to as water's hick 
of sex appeal. 

Campaign fright faded election 
came in. That they painted a fan- 
tastic picture is an understate- 
ment: "Yes" votes, 197,566; "no" 
votes, 17,354! 

Where the huge amount of the 
bond issue was the largest in the 
City's history, the startling 11-to-l 
vote was he largest approval over 
given a proposition in the City's 
history. 

Don Fazackerly, PUC Pi'esident 
during the campaign, resigned that 
office the day after election, after 
paying fervent tribute to the vot- 
ers for their response to the bond 
issue. Although he stepped down 
from the presidency, he remained 
on the Commission. 

And Stuart N. Greenberg, Ihe 
(Continuel on Page 11) 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 




STUART N. GREENBERG 
President, Public Utilities Commission 



ROBERT C. KIRKWOOD 

Manager Utilities 



JAMES H. TURNER 
General Manager, Water Department 



ORAL L. MOORE 
Chief, Hetch Hetchy 



GERALD S. LEVIN 

Jud^e^ Superior Court 
City and County of San Francisco 

By DEAN ST. DENNIS 



I 1956, A PROMINENT San Francisco attorney was faced with one 
)f the biggest decisions of his life: Should he leave a lucrative law 
ictice and. in a sense, start a new career at the age of 50 ? 

Vhen Gerald S. Levin made his decision, it was against the advice 
some of his associates in the law firm of Pillsbury, Madison, and 

TO. 

Some of my senior partners said: 'Why start all over again?' They 

•en't in hearty approval." 

Jut Levin decided to accept an appointment offered b.v then Gover- 

■ Goodwin J. Knight and was named a judge on the Municipal Court 

ich here. 

n an intei-view this wek. Levin versity of California, he spent a 

ailed that "When Knight ran year at the Harvard Law School, 

goveinor, I was asked by some and then returned to the law flini 

minent people here if I would here. 

ist. I helped Knight in the cam- In the years that followed. Levin 

gn here. I had no motive at all became a partner in the firm, han- 

an interest in good govern- dling some of its biggest accounts 

nt. I didn't do that work to be- — Equitable Life, Bank of Califor- 

ne a judge. " nia. Standard Oil, Pacific Tele- 

<ater. however. Knight offered phone. 

rin the Municipal Court post, During World War II, Levin was 

I Levin declined. Then another chief of the War Department 

!r was made and Levin declined Branch, Pacific Division, of the 

lin. Corps of Engineers for Utilities 

I had reached a good earning and Highways. 

ition in my law firm, and I Later, he resumed his work with 

ned down the governor's offer, both the law firm and the San 

t then he asked me again, and Francisco Bar Association. In 1953, 

ccepted. It appealed to my de- he was elected president of the Bar 

! to do something for the pub- here, and took a year's leave to 

guide its activities. 

I told my law partners this was Duiing that year, he created 

ne, honorable position, one that some 40 Bar committees, and did 

aid give me a chance to do additional work on The Brief Case, 

lething for the welfare of all of the Bar's magazine which he cre- 

people." ated and edited in 1950. 

'hat initial appointment was fol- When he was named to the Mu- 

■ed by another one in 1958 — to nicipal Court, State Bar President 

Superior Court bench. Toda.v, James A. Farraher commented: 

in is Superior Judge Gerald S. "When his name came before the 

'in, and the second career is a Governors of the State Bar for con- 

tt fact. sideration on judicial abiility, there 

*vin was born in Danville, 111., was enthusiasm, with spontaneous 

luary 9, 1906, and has lived in and unanimous endor.sement." 

1 Pranci.sco since 1910. He went In the years that Levin has been 

work for Pillsbury, Madison, on the bench here, he has kept up 

I Sutro .shortly after he enrolled a pace that wou'.d cause men half 

the University of California in his age to wilt, 

•keley. "Everyone asks me how I find 

le went to school all day, and the time for these things. Well, if 

n put in an eight-hour shift as ,vou work 18 to 20 hours a da.v, you 

firm'."^ law librarian. "I was a find time to do what vou want lo 

ir boy," he recalled, "and I had do." 

work my way through college. When he is not in the courtroom 

id a family of six people to sup- or working in his chambers, hei' 

t. And that was in the 30's, are some of the civic activities 

." Levin engages in: 

Ifter graduating from the Uni- Past chairman and director of 



the San Franci.seo Heart Associa- 
tion, secretary of the San Fran- 
cisco Courthouse Committee, direc- 
tor of the California Heart As.so- 
ciation, a member of the advisory 
board of the Salvation Army, a di- 
rector of the American Cancer So- 
ciety here, a dii'ector of the local 
chapter of the National Safety 
Council, chairman of both the San 
Francisco Council on Alcoholism 
and the Alcohohcs Rehabilitation 
Association; foiTner president of 
the Jimior Achievement nf San 



Francisco, chairman of a delin- 
quency study committee of the 
Commonwealth Club of California, 
an official of the Press and Union 
League Club, and an official of 
both the California Grand Lodge 
of Masons and the BPOE, San 
Francisco Lodge. 

In addition to all of this. Levin 
was the founder of the California 
Courts Commentary, a publication 
sent to all judges in the state. 

"I though that judges should be 
( Continued on Page 10) 



''IWt 




GHRALD S. LE\IN— Judge, Super 



C.-JAN., 1962 



DIESEL 
ENGINEERING 
SERVICE 

Complete Diesel Engine 
Repairs and Service 

1401 Middle Harbor Road 
Oakland 20, California 

TEmplebar 2-2118 


FOTENOS BROS. 

MEAT CO. 

Since 1909 

WHOT-FSALE MEATS 

Underhill 1-4226 

1220 HOWARD STREET 
San Francisco 


BROADMORE RICHFIELD SERVICE STATION 

BRAKE SERVICE TUNE-UPS MINOR REPAIRS 


The BOURBON SHOP 

A Complete Line of Imported and Domestic 

WINES 6f LIQUORS 

1700 POLK ST. OR 3-6526 


DAN BURTAVOY, Ne»' Owner 

93 - 87th St. PL 6-9837 

DALY CITY 


CASH! For Junk Cars and Trucks 

A & B AUTO WRECKERS 






A & B La Dew 

Kngineering^ Inc. 


WILL PICK UP - Parts for All Makes o{ Cars 
MI 8-9696 100 JENNINGS ST. San Francisco 


ROY GR 4-0878 

B & B AUTO REPAIR CO. 

Open 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Daily — Half Day Saturday 
639 HYDE ST. Bet. Post a: Geary 


MOBILE RADIO ENGINEERS 


35 DORMAN AVENUE 

San Francisco Z4, California 

Mission 8-8S8S 


■FLEET COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS" 
1150 Larkin St. 1415 Bush St. 

GR 4-6321 HI 4-0941 
San Francisco 9 Oakland 12 


CHESTER S AUTO REPAIR 

TUNE-UPS MOTOR REBUILDING 

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 

BRAKE SERVICE 

629 Gough St. WAInut 1-5355 San Francisco, Calif. 


P.O. Box 2127 

FuUerton, California 

MAdison 6-83I9 


Continental Service Co. 

260 Fifth Street 
San Francisco 3, California 



Arouud and About 



11 Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson and 
eodoic Roosevelt. Each likeness 
carved out of solid gfianite and 
asures about 60 feet fiom chin 
forehead. Gutzon Borglum, 



Lires is one of the largest ever 
lertaken. The heads ai-e in pro- 
•tion of men 465 feet high. Each 
id is twice as high as the head 
the Great Sphinx of Egypt. 



I5.V WHIT HENRY 

i MY LAST CX)LII\LN I told some of the htffhiights of my wife's 
uid my wonderful >ucati<>n trip and the lii.st port of call mentioned 
s the Biullands of .South Diikotj). From there we took in Mount 
slimore in thi^ Black Hills of that relathely still uns|H>iled state. 

3n the granite face of Mount 

shmore have been carved the .^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ Georgetown. Gold 

^*^'!l':';!''ll!!fl^',"l^°.":„^''„'^: ^«« fl'«t discovered in Georgetown 
in 1859. Four years later silver was 
discovered nearby and in quick 
succession, over a hundred silver 
veins were tapped in and around 
Georgetown. By 1868 the toviTi had 

ilptured the models and directed ^ population of more than 5,000. 
work. This group of sculptured ^^ ^^^^ ^.^^^ .^ ^^^ ^^„^^ ^^^ ..gj,. 

ver Queen," was the third largest 
city in Coloiado and the greatest 
producer of silver in the world. 
More than $100,000,000.00 in preci- 
ous metal was taken from the sur- 
Jorglum began work on August pounding mountains. In 1896 the 
1927, the same day that Presi- bubble burst— silver lost its value 
It Calvin Coolidge dedicated the ^nd within a few short months all 
morial. He continued the work [[^j^j remained were fond memoiies 
til his death in March of 1941. ^nd a few families that refused to 
J son Lincoln continued the job move. The town is still remarkably 
til October of the same .year. ^^^ preserved and those who are 
rglum used at Mount Rushmore tjjgj.g taj^g pride in keeping it as a 
! same engineering methods he treasure spot of the present day. 
i evolved at Stone Mountain in ^ natural stopping place half- 
orgia. The fiist step was to blast ^^y between Denver and Salt Lake 
ay the surface rock until a point (-.jjy jg craig, Colorado. On several 
s reached where a solid gi'anite occasions we have stayed there and 
:e, unbi-oken by the deep fissures gyery time we put up at the Cos- 
ing and cross checking the face „,.iff Hotel and Motel. The accom- 
the mountain was exposed. The modations are excellent and best of 
rk was done by drills, jackham- ^jj fi^^y f,ave a restaurant where 
rs, and dynamite. Borglum j^g food is delicious and perfectly 
.ined a group of ex-miners to do served. All too often, food in the 
• work. All the driUing and ^j^je open spaces is hard to find, 
isting was done on the basis of ^ut you will not be disappointed if 
asurements obtained from a you stop at the Cosgi'iff in Craig. 
del. An interesting spot there is the 
ro view Mount Rushmore in all chamber of Commerce which is 
splendor and grandeur is an housed in a railroad car that was 
)erience one will never forget. once the private car of a David 
West of Denver we took in the Moffat, a pioneer railroad man in 
3se towns that dot the moun- Colorado. 
ns of that state. Most fascinat- (Continued on Page 121 









CLAREXCE X. COOPER^ 

MOllTUAItlES 




Fruilvale Chapel Elmhursl Chapel 
1580 FRUITVALE AVENUE 8901 E. 14lh STREET 

KEIlog 3-4114 NEptune 2-4343 



G. W. THOMAS DRAYAGE AND RIGGING CO. INC. 


GENERAL DRAYING 


FREIGHT FORWARDING 


^^ 


114- 14th STREET 


^^f ^^^ 


HEmlock 1-9624 


%mf 


San Francisco 



Phone OLympic 2-8210 Day or Night 

RED TOP ELECTRIC CO. 

EMERYVILLE, INC. 

Electrical Construction and Maintenance 



J77 Adeline Street 



Emeryville 8, California 



s. DETERIORATION— Our custom 
efundable), vHamins, foods, etc.. 
leisurely, ECONOMICALLY. 



s repeat, send others. Our catalogs 
irganic, guoranteed. Our customers 



Bauer's Health Service 

4023 ARMY STREET 
■YOUR SATISFACTION, OUR ADVERTISEMENT- 
SAN FRANCISCO 14, CALIF. — (STRICTLY MAIL ORDER) 



Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Established 1S94 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 

Executive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, California 



NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 



WIRING SUPPLIES 



Distributors 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 



APPLIANCES 



San Francisco 3, Calif.— 1830 Harrison Street— Phone HEmlock 1-8529 

Santa Rosa, Calif. — 100 Fourth Street— Phone Liberty 5-3593 

San Carlos, Calif.— 1068 .American Street— Phone LYtell 10743 

Oakl.ind 8. Calif.— 3521 Chestnut Street— Phone OLvmpic 3-0416 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Oirectors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



:C.-JAN.. 1962 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Hall MA 1-OlGS 

CoorRe Christopher. Mayor 

John D. Sulivan, Executive Secretary 
Uohcrt M. Smnllev. Confidential Secretary 
Marearet Smith. Personal Secretary 
John T.I Montz. Administrative Assistant 
Rohert Uoikwell. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS. BOARD OF 

23.'; CItv Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Peter Tamaras. President. 1020 Harrison 
William C. Blake. 90 Fol.-som St. 
rtoe-er Roas. 2.'12S Oearv St. 
Joseph M. Casev. 252R Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Dobhs. 3.51 California St. 
n- Charles A. E>tola. 253 Columbus Ave. 
John J. Ferdon. LIS Monteomery St. 
James U Hallev. R70 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 

T-lrk M'lrrisnn 2?iOO nrp.^Tiwif^Ti St. 

Joseph R, TInney. 2517 Mission St. 
Robert J. Dolan. Clerk 
I.llllan M. Senter. Chief As.slstant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development— Boas. Blake. 

County, "state and National Affairs— Ferdon, Dobbs. 

McMahon „ . „, , 

Education, Parks and Recreation — Ertola. Blake. 

Finance. Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs, Ferdon. 
Halley 

Judiciary. Legislative and Civil Service — Tinney. 
McMahon. Morrison 

IVilice— Casev. Ertola. Tinney 

Public Buildings. Lands and City Planning — Mor- 
rison. Boas. Tinney 

Public Health and Welfare — McMahon. Halley. Mor- 
rison 

Public Utilities— Halley. Dobbs, Ferdon 

Streets and Highways — Blake. Boas. Ertola 

Rules— Tamaras. Dobbs. Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall KL, 2-1010 

Russell L. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

206 Citv Hall HE 1-1322 

Thomas J. O'Connor 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

8S0 Bryant St. KI> 3-!llll 

Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

8.'iO Bryant St. KL 3-1671 

Edward T. Mancuso 

SHERIFF 

331 Citv Hall 
Matthew C. Carberry 
TREASURER 

110 City Hall 
John J. Goodwin 



HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor, City Hall UN 1-8SD; 

John B. Mollnari, Presiding Francis McCarty 

itaymond J. Arata Edward Molkenbuhr 

Carl H. Allen Clarence W. Morris 

Byron Arnold Harry J. Neubarth 

Walter Carpeneti Haymond J. O'Connoi 

C. Harold Caulfleld Edward P. O'Day 

Melvyn I. Cronin Charles S. Peery 

Norman Elklngton George W. Schonfeld 

Timothy I. Fltzpatrick William P. Traverso 

Joseph Karesh Alvln E. Weinberger 

Cerald S. Ijevin IT. A. van dcr Z.c 

Joseph M. Cummins, Secretary 

480 City Hall UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall KL 2-3008 

.\ridrew J. Kyman. Presiding Leland J. Lazarus 

.\lbert A. Axclrod clarence A. Linn 

John W. Bussev George E. Maloncy 

I'.oben J. Drewes William A. O'Brien 

Bernard B. Gllckfeld LenoreD. Underwood 

Clayton W. Horn James J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-300S 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

S'M Bryant St. KL 2-3008 

James Leddy. Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

•157 City Hall UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at S P.M. 
William McDonnell. Foreman 
Dr. Donald Schulz. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

S.SO Br.vant St. KL 3-9111 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman, 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew P. Connolly. 399 Fremont St. 
William Moskovitz. 5030 Geary Blvd. 
Robert A. Peabodv. 456 Post St. 
Adolph L. Plerotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5740 

Thomas F. Strycula, 

Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 

JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 445 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger. 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
Rev. James B. Plynn, 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Josepii Mignola. Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean. 

940 - 25th St. N.W.. Washington. D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator, Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkln HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley. M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Nell Sinton. 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagoplan. 220 Bush St. 

Mark Harris, 1600 HoUoway 

Betty Jackson, 2835 Vallejo St. 

William E. Knuth, 16O0 Holloway Ave. 

Joseph Esherlck, 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Josepli H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION * 

100 Larkln St. HE 1-2 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 
Gardner W. Meln. Pres.. 315 Montgomery St. 
Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. 
James S. Kearney. 400 North Point 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter. 142 - 27th Avenue 
George Thomas Rockrlse. 405 Sansome St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller, Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall HE 1-2 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Wm. Kilpatrick, President, 827 Hyde St. 
Richard C. Ham. 200 Bush St. 
Hubert J. Sober. 155 Montgomery St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 

DISASTER CORPS 

850 Bryant St. KL 3-1 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.), Director 
Alex X. McCausland, Public Information Officer 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-1 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M., 
170 Pell St. 

Samuel Ladar. President. Ill Sutter St. 

Mrs. La-n'rence Draper. Jr., 10 Walnut St. 

Adolfo de Urioste. 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Edward Kemmitt. 601 Polk St. 

Mrs. Claire Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 

Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 

Tames E. Stratton. 800 Presidio Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt, of Schools and Sei 



FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 1-i 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 
Dr. Peter Angel, President. 1867 - 15th Ave. 
Bert Simon. 1350 Folsom St. 
Philip Dindia. 536 Bryant St. 

William F. Murray. Chief of Department 

Albert E. Hayes. Chief, Division of Fire 
Prevention & Investigation 

Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1-! 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 
Donald J. McCook, President, 220 Montgomery S 
George W. Cuniffe, 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell, M.D., 977 Valencia St. 
Frank J. Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave. 
Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Robert E. Hunt, Claims Supervisor 

Lyle J. O'Connell, Executive Director 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3-1 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jacob Shemano, Chairman. 130 Montgomery St. 

Charles R. Green,stone. 182 Second St. 

Solomon E. Johnson, 704 Market St. 

Charles J. Jung. 622 Washington St. 

Al P. Mailloux. 2940 - 10th St. 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. HE 1-: 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 
John E. Sullivan, Chairman, 69 West Portal 
Arthur S. Becker. 3475 California St. 
Donald Magnin, 77 O'Farrell St. 
G. Baltzer Peterson. 2910 Vallejo St. 
David Thomson, 65 Berry St. 

Vining T. Fisher, General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 



:rmit appeals, board of 

227 City Hall 



M.-.ls 



Wt'tliicsday 



t 3:00 P.M. 
nt. 9S4 Kolsi 



llllain H. II. Davis. Pre 
Max Moiiip, BilS Potrero Ave. 
lorKi' Ulllln, 4091 - 19th Ave. 
arence J. Walsh. 24B0 - 17th St. 
mest Ij. West. 265 Montgomery St. 
J. Kdwln Mattox, Secretary 

>LICE COMMISSION 

850 liryalit St. KL. :i-0123 

Meits every Monday at 5:00 P.M. 
lonias J. Mellon. President, 390 Klr.st St. 
,ul A. Ulsslnger, 415 Sansome St. 
irold R. McKlnnon. 2.';5 California St. 

Thoniu.s J. Cahill. chl.-f of PoUie 
Alfred J. Nelder. Deputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas ZaraKOza. Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel P. .McKU-m. Chief of In.spectors 
Lt. Wni. J. O'Brien, Comml.sslon Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler, Department Secretary 

JBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center HR 1-2121 

Meets l.st Tuesday of month at 3:30 P.M. 

Lee Vavuris, President. 990 Geary St. 
hn M. Uransten. 665 - 3rd St. 
. Allen Bhrhardt, 2 San Rafael Way 
ise M I'nnucchI, 1445 Stockton St. 
)rtimer Fleishhacker. ,Ir.. 601 California St. 
irKarit V. Girdner, 2130 Fulton St. 
hn E. Gurlch. 300 Monteomerv St. 
•V. William Turner, 1642 Broderick St. 
*s. J. ITenry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 
Hon K. T,epetlch, 1655 Polk Street 
lomas W. S. Wu, D.D.S.. 1111 Stockton St. 
William R. Holman. Librarian 
Frank A. Clarvoe, Jr., Secretary 

IBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
lart X. GreenberR, President. 765 Folsom St. 
n Fazackerley. 851 Howard St. 
orge F. Hansen, 215 Market St. 
lOmas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 
onias F. Stack. 703 Market St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood, Managrer of Utilities 

James J. Finn, Secretary to Commission 

Bureaus and Departments 
counts, 2S7 City Hall HE 1-2121 

George Negri, Director 
■port, San Francisco International, S. P. 28 

n.lford Brown, Manager PL 6-0500 

tch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Oral L. Moore. Gen. Mgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 

inicipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. Fl 6-5656 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
rsonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
blic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
Iter Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James II. Turner, General Manager 

IBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St. EX 7-6000 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays each month 
at 9 A.M. 

ink H. Sloss. President. 351 California St. 

Xavier Barrios. 2325 Ocean Ave. 
s. Margaret R. Murray, 1306 Portola Drive 
illlam P. Scott, Jr., 249 Natoma St. 
;queline Smith, 2015 Stelner St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Eulala Smith, Secretary 

ICREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLiiren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4S66 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 

liter A. Haa.-i. Sr.. President, 98 Battery St. 

;er Bereut, 1333 Jones St. 

xy .Margaret Casey, 632 Mission St. 

lUam M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

. Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

». Joseph J. Moore, Jr., 2000 Washington St. 

in F. Conway, Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell, General Manager 
Paul N. Moore, Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gate Ave. UN 3-7730 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
erett Griffin. Chairman. 465 California St. 
nes B. Black. Jr.. 120 Montgomerv St. 
nes A. Folger. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
n-reni-e R. Palaclos, 355 Haves St. 

M. Justin Herman, Executive Director 

jr. c. H.-rmann. Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

450 Mi-Allister St. HIO 1-2I2I 

Meet.-i every Wednesday at 2 P..M. 
Martin F. Wormuth. Pn-sidint. 4109 Pacheco 

nes M. Crane, .'is:! Monlgcuuery St. 
James M. Humill. 120 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Dlez, 22.",! - ::5tli Ave. 
William T. Reed, Lil.M - isth .\ve. 

Ex-Otflcio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA 1-6600 

Meets 2na Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Frederic Campagnoli. President. 300 Montgomery 
Eugene D. Bennett, 226 Bush St. 
" ink A. Flynn, 1549 Noriega St. 
Prentis C. Hale, Jr., 867 Market St, 
George T. D.xvis. Ill Sutter St. 

n K. Harrison, 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson, 19 Maywood Drive 
Wilson Meyer, 333 Montgomery St. 
Guido J. Musto, 535 North Point 
Samuel D. Savad. 35 Aptos Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 

E. Lawrence George, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2040 

George Culler, Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Ra.rntond L. Bozzini, Commissioner 
?mers' Market, Bavshore & Alemany 

Frank J. O'Connell, Market Master MI 7-9423 

CORONER 

.S50 Bryant St. KL 3-1694 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 



HE 1-2121 
D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Dovle L. Smith, Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
UN 1-8000, Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk-Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin J. Mongan. 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 167 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

L. J. LeGuennec, 160 Otis 

HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEniloek 1-2121, Ext. 704 
rry 1. Bigarani. 13S4 Vi.rk St. 
Lloyd Conrich, 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnln, Stockton & O'Farrell 
Frank B. Oman, 567 - 4th St. 

Bernard A. Cummings, Secretary, 264 City Hall 

Ex-Officio Members: 

James R. McCarthy, Director of City Planning 

Irwin J. Mussen, Urban Renewal Co-ordlnator 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox, Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

T. Tsou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

• ■ -- ■ ndent MO 4-15S0 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 
Dr. T. E. Albers. Superintendent MI 8-S200 

ergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 
Earl niake, Adni. Superintendent HE 1-2800 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

ity Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 
Brooks Ivarter, 

Assistant Director, Administrative 
•ron Tartarian, 
Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 
Accounts, 260 City Hall 

J. J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 265 City Hall 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, I.IO Mi'AlIlster St. 

Kdliert C. Levy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army 

A. If. Ekenberg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. 450 McAllister St. 

Sidney Franklin. Supervisor 
Egineering, 359 City Hall 

Cliff., rd J. Oeertz, City Engineer 

& Sewage Treatment, 2323 



U-.ilt 



H. ,lr, 






ende 



Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. 

IJernard M. Crotty, Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. 

F. I). Brown. Superintendent 
Urban Renewal. 450 McAllister St. 

H.rnard A. Ciimiiilngs. Analyst 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 

Ben Benas, Purchaser of Supplies 
T, F. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. M. Flaherty, Superintendent 

nd Supplies, 15th and Harrl.' 



HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

Army 
HIO 1 
HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 



2121 

-2121 

-2121 

'2121 

-2121 

-2121 

St. 

-2121 

-2121 

2121 

-2121 



Tabulatii 



I';. I.f 



HOC 



and Reproduction, Room 50 



REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

45" .McAllister St. 
Philip L. Rezos. Director of Properlv 
.Tames T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 CItv Hall 1 

O. C. Skinner. Jr. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-6100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 

THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday, Jan.. April, June, Oct. 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President. 
2 Pine St. 

Alexander de Bretteville, Honorary Member, 2000 
Washington St. 

Mrs. C. Tobin Clark, House on Hill, San Mateo 

William W. Mein. Honorary Member, 316 Montgom- 
ery St. 

Mrs. Alexander Albert. 2320 Lvons St. 

loseph M. Bransten, 665 - 3rd St. 

Walter E. Buck, President, 235 Montgomery St. 

E. Raymond Armsby, 111 Sutter St. 

Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 

Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 

Mrs. Bruce Kelham, 15 Arguello Blvd. 

Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 

David Pleydell-Bouverle. Glen Ellen. Calif. 

John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomerv St. 

William R. Wallace. Jr., 100 Bush St. 

Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 

Harold L. Zellerbach. 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe, Jr.. Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. ,\pril, June. Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. George Camenm. Honorary' President. 
Hillsborough 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Miss Louise A. Boyd, 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

Charles de Toung Thierlot, 1802 Florlbunda, Hills- 
borough 

R. Gwin Follis. 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Helmbucher. 220 Bush St. 

Orover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garrett McEnernev. 11. 444 California St. 

Ro.scoe F. Oakes. 220 Bush St. 

Joseph O. Tobin, 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker, Burllngame Country Club 

Charles Page, 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Filoli. .San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

sident. Recreation & Park Commlsgion 

Richard Rheem. Director 

Col. Ian F. M. Macalplne, Secretary 



Robert J. Bv 

PUBLIC POUND 
2500 - 16th St. 
Charl.s W. Frledrlchs. Exe 



HE 1-2121 



C-JAN., 1962 



JUDGE LEVIN 

(Continued from Page 5i 
aware of all practices to facilitate 
the administration of justice. I felt 
they should have same mediimi in 
which to exchange ideas. All the 
judges I have heard from have 
been complimentary to me about 
it." 

Levin also was one of the au- 
thrs of a Juror's Handbook, given 
to jurors to give them an insight 
into the complex functions of the 
court. 

Another of Levin's favorite civic 
jobs is the Alcoholism Council. 
"Only 3 per cent of the alcoholics 
are on skid row. Most of them are 
in offices. It's an extremely seri- 
ous problem in this community." 

And he added: "Seventy-five per 
cent of all criminal offenses are 
committeed under the influence of 
alcohol." Part of the work of the 
Rehabilitation Council is a first- 
step home, where alcoholics are 
started on the road to recovery. 

Levin also has been active in the 
drive for a new Civil Courts build- 
ing ,the Northern California Serv- 
ice League, which helps rehabili- 
tate county jail prisoners, and is 
one of the founders of a new na- 
tional magazine for judges similar 
to the California Courts Commen- 
tarv. 



Levin has a wide range of 
friends. On the walls of his cham- 
bers — lined with book cases and 
filing cabinets filled to overflowing 
are autographed pictiu'es of him 
with U. S. Supreme Court Justice 
Earl Warren, former Vice Presi- 
dent Richard M. Nixon and former 
Governor Knight, 

Of his present position. Levin 
said: "I didn't take this job ju.st to 
be called judge. I wanted to do 
something. And I think I have con- 
tributed something." 

One of the keystones of his pol- 
icy is that his door is always open 
— to everyone. 

"Judges shouldn't think that just 
because we have a title we're priv- 
ileged characters, elevated above 
everyone else. I try to treat all 
with compassion. I get letters ev- 
ery day from county jail prisoners, 
and I answer them all. 

"I never turn anyone away. 
Sometimes, a woman and her chil- 
dren will come to see me after her 
husband has been sentenced. Usu- 
ally they're under a terrible men- 
tal strain. I want to see if I can do 
something to help them. 

"So many of the people get in 
trouble because they're poor. I was 
reared in a poor environment, and 
I know how difficult it is to get 
along." 

Levin added: "My door is always 
open." 



MAIL-AWAY 
SERVICE 

Processors of Kodak Scrvic 

P.O. BOX 3563 

RINCON ANNEX 

San Francisco 19 



G. Armanino & Sons 

Chive Growers 

250 Williams Ave. 

JU 6-3440 



BAYLACQ LAUNDRY 

FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Delivery 
Service 



116 Clement St. 
SK 1-0971 



Glen Hunter's Moving 

EXPRESS fef TRANSFER 

Slale-Wide 
Service 

3330 Ortega St. 

MO.41-2644 

LO 6-4300 




Claude Berhouel and Claudine Berhouet, Props. 

Hotel de France 

BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 

780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



' — ^^^ 

STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

315 BRYANT ST. at 6th MArket 1-3063 

San Francisco 3, California 



University of San Francisco 

• Undergraduate Programs 

# School of Law 

♦ Graduate Programs 
EVENING DIVISION 

San Francisco 1 7, Cali'fornia 

In Its Second Century of Service to California 



Bay Counties Title Guaranty Co. 

131-135 HAYES STREET 

PERSONALIZED SERVICE FOR TITLE INSURANCE ond BUSINESS ESCROWI 
San Francisco, Calif. Underhill 3-212( 



FLASH PHOTO SERVICE 

PHOTOS FINISHED AND DEVELOPED— Also Color 

FREDERICK and MARCELINE CASTLEMAN 
573 Mission Street DOuglas 2-684< 



JU 9-6626 



'ADD-TO' CORPORATION 

Remodeling and Alteration 

946 EL CAMINO REAL 

South San Francisco, California 

"LES" DAVIS, President 



SWISS AMERICAN SAUSAGE CO. 

"Marconi Brand" 
35 WILLIAMS AVENUE 



San Francisco 24, Calif. 



ATwater 8-540( 



THE RECOS 



GIANT WATER 

( Continued from Page 4 ) 
«r Commission President, ob- 
rved, "Well, the campaign was 
■mendous indeed. Now it's up to 

to roll up our sleeevos and get 
ing!" 

Which is exactly what the Utili- 
s engineers are now doing. 
During the campaign, San Fran- 
ico had been told that the water 
nd issue would not only pay for 
elf — through revenues from the 
le of water and power — but 
»t there would also De the pos- 
lility of water rate reductions. 
In a swift follow-up movi- the 
JC last month approved a Water 
ipartment budget for 1962-63 
at provides for a 5 psr cent rate 
luction. This will benefit both re- 
il customers in San Francisco 
d wholesale customer.? in the 
rvice area outside the City, and 

anticipated to be in effect at 
LSt by July. 

Before the end of thi.s year, three 
the bond i.ssue's eight items are 
leduled to be under consti-uction, 
iluding the urgently required 
ird pipeline across the San Joa- 
in Valley which will bring the 
;al capacity up to about 300,- 
9,000 gallons daily. This $22,- 
5,000 project will utilize the 
■ne 47-miles long right-of-way 
» two existing pipelines are laid 
der. 

Another is the $6,500,000 con- 
•uction of San Antonio Dam in 
ithem Alameda County to pro- 
le the system with needed addi- 
nal local water storage. A high 
iority is given this project be- 
use of a stipulation in approval 

the State Water Rights Board 
lich calls for the start of cim- 
■uction this year, completion by 
; end of 1964. 

rhe third project scheduled fo'- 
istruction in 1962 is the New 



ic^-^ 




One of the West's most inspiring sights is giant Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, located in the granite-faced watershed of 
the Tuolumne River in the High Sierra. It is the "business" end of the 167-miIe-Iong water lifeline which quenches 
the thirst of San Francisco and its neighboring Peninsula and South Bay communities. 



Don Pedro Dam in the foothills 'if 
the mountains near Chinese Camp, 
which will be built jointly by San 
Francisco and the Modesto and 
Turlock Irrigation District.-;. The 
City's cost — approximately half 
of the total project — wi'.l be ■'545,- 
000,000. It is the largest single 
item in the $115,000,000 bond is- 
sue, and will result in more than 
doubling the amount of water 
stored in Hetch Hetchy Reservoir 



available to San Francisco. 

This is because the irrigation 
districts have rights to the Toul- 
umne River water that are prior 
to those of San Fiancisco, and 
which are recognized as such by 
the Raker Act which permitted the 
City to construct its water system 
in the Yosemite National Park 
area. 

An interesting aspect of t'lc- Nev'.- 
Don Pedro is that th'3 actual water 



in the dam will not come to San 
Francisco — it will all be used by 
the irrigation districts. It is actu- 
ally "exchange" water which will 
relieve the Ctiy of its legal obliga- 
tion to turn some of it3 Hetch 
Hetchy water over to the districts 
and, thus, will enablb the City to 
more than double the amount of 
water available to it from the 
granite-faced watershed of the 
High Sierra. 



Let-George-Do-It 

GEORGE P. SCHMITT 

ieating & Plumbing Contractors 

3281 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 10, California 


Gary's Auto Service 

Touring - AAA Auto Assn. Service 
General Auto Repairs 

3475 CHAMPION ST. 
KE 6-2165 Oakland, Calif. 


Phone VA. 4-9146 

RAY CICERONE REALTY 

Realtor 

POTRERO HILL PROPERTIES 

RAY CICERONE, Broiler 

1542-20+h Street 

San Francisco 


BAYLACQ LAUNDRY 


The Brayton Hotel Apartments 

50 Turk St. GR. 4-4811 


FRENCH LAUNDRY 
DeMvery Service 


MIKE'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

Repairs - Tune-up - Tires 

Batteries - Accessories 

Pick-up a: Delivery 

Mike Inouye 

1999 Pine St. WA. 1-2825 


6 Clement St. SK 1-0971 


WHITE HOUSE 
FRENCH LAUNDRY 

J. p. CASSOU 

2549 Clay St. WEst 1-8073 

San Francisco IS 


HAYES VALLEY AQUARIUM 


Compile Line of Tropical F.sl. 
atiii Equipment 

27-A Hayes Street UN. 3-3483 


BELL BAZAAR 

Stationery - Greeting Cards - Toys 
3030 - 16th Street UN. 1-2824 



Automatic Home 
Laundry Service 

for service CALL YU 2-0634 
60 CLARA STREET 

FARMERS 

INSURANCE 

GROUP 

Bert Weible, District Manager 

2141 LOMBARD STREET 
JO 7-1860 



C.-JAN., 1962 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 7) 
A traveller should never pass 
through Salt Lake City, but should 
pause and reflect on its histoi-j' and 
visit Temple Square. This is the 
center of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints. They 
were the ones who, under the lead- 
ership of Brigham Young, settled 
in and promoted this area. Temple 
Square is a ten acre block in the 
city from which all streets are 
numbered, east, west, north, and 
south. Although in the heart of the 
business section, it is noted for its 
atmosphere of repose and quiet. 
This delightful contrast with the 
noise of street results largely from 
a high wall which entirely sur- 
round.s the square. Beautifully 
landscaped grounds and solid, ma- 
jestic buildings also contribute to 
this atmosphere. 

In the square are found the his- 
toric Tabemacle and Temple, as 
well as other places of interest, in- 
cluding the Assembly Hall, various 
monuments, the oldest house now 
standing in Salt Lake City, a bu- 
reau of Information and a muse- 
um. Each of these has a peculiar 
significance, and intei-woven in 
their stories is the history of Salt 
Lake City, the State of Utah and 



Cornelius Murchison 

BOAS PONTIAC 

New 8. Used Cors 
Geory at Broderick 



Sunshine Rest Home 

24 Hour Care for Ambulatory 

Guests — Men d Women 

Elevator Service — Anne Murr^iy 

719 - 36th Ave. SK 1-7705 

Custom-Aire 
Products 

Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 

Mfgrs. of Forced Air - Gas 

Fired Heaters & Wall Furnaces 

Air Conditioning 

600 Indiana Street 
VA 6-7171 

H. WENiGER 

Manufacturers oj 

Instruments for Hand Surgery 

Active Hond & Finger Splints 

70- 12th Street MA. 1-6876 



of the entire intermountain west. 
It is the story of the "Mormon" 
pioneei-s. Guided lecture tours are 
given to these who are interested, 
througout the day, and those who 
take the tours will not be disap- 
pointed. 

At this poiint on our westward 
journey we Here like <iUI fire horses 
heading hark to the fire house, hut 
no San Franciscan will, if possible, 
pass up the opportunit.v to try his 
luek in one or more of the luilaces 
of chance in our neighboring stat«. 
This time we stayed in Sparks and 
our stop-over was niade most 
pleasant by that enterprising en- 
trepreneur named Dick Graves. 
I've ne\er met him personall.y, but 
I enjoyed his operations and if you 
want a dinner that is different and 
serumtpioHs, dine at Trader Dick's, 
(There I go — mentioning good 
food again. But doesn't good din- 
ing inake travelling more pleas- 
ant ? ) 

Thence back to San Francisco 
with pleasant memories of a 
month that passed all too rapidly 
but after all — it's great to be back 
in the City by the Golden Gate. 

Adieu for now. 



Mel-Williams Company 

Canned & Frozen Food Services 

15 California Street San Francis 

Telephone: EXbrook 2-7366 



KOWirS RICHFIELD SERVICE 

We Gwe 
S i^ H Green Stamps 

2 Steiner Street MA. 6-0530 



Fire - Li.ibility - Life - Auto 

RAYMOND Q. WONG 

INSURANCE BROKER 

Western Life Insurance 
Company 

818 CLAY STREET 
Bus.: GA 1-3975 



TOULOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Laundry & Cleaning 
821 Lincoln Way 1*10. 4-1634 



RUTHIE'S SCHOOL OF DANCE 

SjiccmlirniR m Cliildror,? D<nicmg 

Expert Training — Tap, Ballet, 

Character 6? Acrobatic 

2229 Taravol St. OV 1-5226 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

1745 FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 3,, California 

UNderhill 1-1455 

BENZIGER BROS., INC. 



CHURCH GOODS - RELIGIOUS GIFTS 
RELIGIOUS BOOKS 



758 Mission St. 



SU 1-5159 



"Blessings to the City Employees and their Families" 
UNITY TEMPLE 

Reverend Mary Scully 
1164 Market Street San Francisco 

SCAVENGERS' PROTECTIVE ASSN., INC. 



Contractors for the removal of Garbage, Rubbish and Waste Paper 

2550 MASON STREET EX 2-3859 SAN FRANCISCO 11 

Stores - Offices • Basements - Yards - Warehouses Cleaned 

Free Estimates on Any Special Clean Up fob 

Pacific Coast Builders 

No. 1 South Park 
San Francisco 



CASTAGNOLA Fine Sea Food Restaurant 

Andrew B. Castagnola PRospect 6-501 5 San Francisco II 

FOOT OF JONES STREET - FISHERMAN'S WHARF 

CRAB STAND - PRospect 5-1040 

L and H Paint Products 



150 Mississippi St. 



HE 1-4766 



Craftsmen Tool Rental, Inc. 



1265 Folsoni St. 

San Fn 



UN 3-8383 



, Calif. 



EXbrook 2-1313 — Telepho 



EXbrool> M829 



(;eok(;e l. bi!K(;i:k 

W holesale Dealer Potaliu-s and Onions 

52 VALLfcJO SIREEI 
San Francisco 11, California 



HASTIE 



Real Estate Protection and Repair, Inc. 

TERMITES — FUNGI — BEETLES 
225 CAPITOL AVENUE 



in Francisco 12, Calif. 



Delaware 3-3700 



HARRY H. HASTIE 



CALIFORNIA WATER & TELEPHONE CO. 

300 Montgomery St. 
GArfield 1-4826 San Francisco 



Mission 8-3160 

PORTOLA DRAYAGE 

CARGO INSURED 

Local and Long Distance 

167 Van Dyke Avenue San Francisco 24, California 

FREDERICK C. GOMES 



GRAND MARKET 

Be Sure to Visit Our 
GROCERY Dcpt. 

814 Polk St. OR 3-1846 


Ray's Corner Liquors 

506 Valencia near 16th 
UN 3-6334 


CIVIC CENTER STATIONERY 

Complete Line of Stationery 
Greeting Cards 


COLONIAL 

Upholstering Co. 

Matt Spoler 
1846 Union St. FI 6-7793 


68 McAllister St. HE 1-8041 


IVY Beauty Salon 

Hair Styling 

1812 H Eddy St. 

JO 7-3684 


RACE RADIO & TV 


SALES 6/ SERVICE 

707-C SAN JOSE AVE. 

VA 6-1303 


PAUL SEMION 

Public Accountant 

1655 Polk St. 

OR 3-1772 


MARIE'S & SAM'S CLEANERS 

Laundry and Atteraltoiu of All Kinds 

Careful Cleaning — Expert Dycina 

Send U9 your most 

delic.itc garments 

381 Guerrero St. MA 1-1972 


Compliments 
of a Friend 


BILL'S Automatic 
transmission Service 

Ejtpett Stryicc on Ail Mtktt and Modeli 

Urn. (Bill) Burrace. 0«ncr 

4050 -24th St. VA 6-1949 


The WHITE 
MOTOR CO. 

5th &. Brannan Sts. 
San Francisco 



BERKELEY HILLS CHAPEL 

SERVING MORE FAMILIES — Confitjenco — Foundotj on o Trusted Trodition 

You Determine the Cost — Budget Terms 

ONE OF CALIFORNIA'S FINEST MORTUARIES 

Lorge Parking Area— Visitors Welcome— Pre-need Arrongements— Shipment 

1600 Shattiick Ave., Berkeley, California — TH. 1-2300 

A. LEE ODER. President CLARENCE W. PAGE. Jr., Secty-Treosurer 

JOHN M. FREEMAN, General Monager 



BRICKER & SON SERVICE 

TOWING— ANYTIME— ANYWHERE 

VAlencia 4-1210 — VAIencia 4-1289 

USED AUTO PARTS 

24-HOUR TOW SERVICE 

370 Bayshore Boulevard San Francisco, California 



OTAGIRI MERCANTILE CO., Inc. 

70 Pine Street — GA 1-8846 

San Francisco, California 



STEVENSON MACHINE WORKS 

171 STILLMAN ST — SAN FRANCISCO 7 — YUkon 6-1264 

Screw Machine Products - General Machine Work 

Precision Grinding - Small Pitch Gears 

LYLE G. STEVENSON 



PETERSON SUPPLY CO. 

NEON SIGN SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 

480 Fifth Street DOuglas 2-1695 

San Francisco 7, California 



Paulsen Auto Wreckers 

2801 OAKDALE AVE. 
AT 2-1059 
San Fran 



The PILSNER 

Tom Longum 
225 Church St. 

MA 1-7058 

Thf San Francisco 

HEART 

Association 

uses gifts and bequests to 

support research, education 

and community service 

in fighting the nation's 

No. 1 disease. 

259 GEARY ST. 
YU 2-5753 



JACK'S TAVERN 

''Meet your Friends in 
Cheery Atmosphere" 

1931 Sutter St. WE 1-8454 

Bellaire Residence Club 

Cheery Atmosphere- 
Reasonable Rates 

1945 FRANKLIN ST. 

PR 5-9965 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 1962 Fords 

Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Tertns 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 



C.-JAN., 1962 



BAY WINDOW 

(Continiicil from Page 31 

cans in Sacramento's two top jobs. 
Suppose Christopher's Nixon lost 
and suppose Brown's Anderson 




MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 

( remember, the present Lieut. Gov- 
ei'nor?) lost. What would we have 
then? Why, we'd have Governor 
Pat Brown and Lieut. Governor 
George Christopher, a cacophonous 
possibility that send pure political 
shivers of delight up and down 
one's spine! 

The new year started with a 
memorable quote from L. Jack 
Block, chairman of last Septem- 
ber's debt-ridden Africa Week, who 
had been told the city wouldn't bal 
his conrmittee out of the $4300 hole 
it had found itself in . . . Said 
Block balefully: "I guess it's aw- 
fully tough for those boys at City 
Hall to make a decision. If they'd 
just let us know what they're do- 



Victoria Pastry Co., Inc. 

Italian and French Pastries 
and Confections 

Cakei for All Occasions 

1362 STOCKTON STREET 

SU 1-2015 



AIR FRANCE 

The World's Largest Airline 
2B0 STOCKTON ST. 

Tickets and Reservations 

Call YUkon 2-7150 



ing, we'd know what we're do- 
ing." . . , Actually, that applies to 
so many situations where, if some 
people knew what they were doing, 
then others would know what 
THEY were doing. Don't you be- 
lieve ? 

A man who rose head and shoul- 
ders (20 feet up, as a matter of 
fact 1 over indecision early in the 
year was intrepid Cary Baldwin, 
the Zoo czar, who rode up in a 
crane bucket to retrieve an AWOL 
koala named Sydney from a tree- 
top in Fleishhacker Playground 
... Of the wretched Sydney (who 
had forsaken his wives, one of 
them with child, for a full 24-hour 
period) Cary said: "He was look- 
ing down at all of us with a self- 
satisfied grin." Selfish, wretched, 
polygamous Sydney! 

Now, let's see: Did you know 
that KGO Radio & TV newsman 
Harvey Sachs has been awarded an 
active life membership in the Press 
and Union League Club — the first 
time a broadcast newsman has 
been so honored? . . . That the 
most significant bellweather yet of 
possible San Francisco-San Mateo 
County unity is Miss San Francisco 
herself ? Yep, Lana Green who car- 
ries the Miss S. F. title with pretty 
aplomb lives in — Daly City! . . . 
That the harassed staff of the 
Muni Railway now has an element 
of distaff? Who would be Joyce 
Janson, new Muni PR, whose touch 
was seen in the description of the 
Hall of Justice in the recent issue 
of "Muni Memo to You": ". . . You 
may now pay yoiu- traffic tickets 
in this handsome setting . . ." and! 

And another did-you-know: That 
the Kingston Trio, no less, has 
joined the Chamber of Commerce ? 



Re -Elect 



Tops Recovered and Repaired 

Scat Covers Tailored to Fit 

Cushions and Upholstery Built 
and Repaired 

The Jamison 
Auto Top Company 

1581 BUSH STREET 
San Francisco 

Charley & Nellis Bernhardy 

ORdway 3-3170 



MARTIN F. 

"DUKE" WORMUTH 



(INCUMBENT) 

Municipal Railway 

TO 




Retirement Board 



Able ■ Fair & Experienced 



RE-ELECT THE FRIEND OF ALL CITY EMPLOYEES 

Balloting — February 1 through February 15 



EAGLESO^ 
ENGINEERS 



615 Sansome Street 



San Franciso 11, California 



ISorth Beach French-Italian 


Bakery 


516 GREEN STREET 




DOuglas 2-4654 





BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

specialists on Wheel Aligumer 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-7( 

Bill Barca San Franct 



3 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 



■[ 


W / 


•^ 




^^B 


f 


^ 1 


'' '^1 


JAN FRANCISCO 
DEPARTMENT OF 
ELECTRICITY 


Wl 


• J 




Dean St. Dennis 


\B 


_,vrf* 


"***■ \ 


JAY WINDOW 






'^^^1 


GROUND & ABOUT 




1 




Whit Henry 


^^^^^^K^^^l^hi^^^l 


» 





JHl 



DONALD O. TOWNSEND, Chief 
Department of Electricity 



FEBRUARY - MARCH, 1962 




CLAY BERNARD 

Assistant to Vice President 



CLAY BERNARD NAMED 
TO STATE BOARD 

ijDvemor Edmund G. Brown has 
:i|i|>ointed Clay Bernard, 61, of San 
I'lancisco to the Structural Pest 
<.'iiiitrol Board. 

The four-year post was created 
to provide public representation 
on a board which regulates busi- 
nesses and professions, Bernard is 
assistant to the vice president of 
Western Air Lines, and has long 
been one of San Francisco's most 
popular civic and business leaders. 
Western Air Lines. 




\\. HAHKV JOHNS 
K.-alt<.r 



SCHOOL OF REAL ESTATE 

Vital Legal Procedures 

Classes Monday and Tuesday 
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bay w i li d 




■7-EI.L, NOW, WE ARE ABOl'T to give yoii our own Bay Window 
' variety of Aoa<lemy Award Nominations! Eager? Here we go 
he Oscar treli. 

First we'd like to urge that Best New-Ciiaraeter Actor iionors go 
ticliurd Nixon, a gentleman who already ha-s a national reputation, 
Iks to a number of roles played over the past decade and a half. 
( of those roles won him the Best Supporting Actor award of some 

years ago. 

fe feel that Mr. Nixon deserves FOR EDMUND BROWN, also a 

Best New-Character award — character of no slight skill, we are 
entirely new Oscar, this — be- considering another new award for 
se of a refreshingly new and Most Consistent Actor. No one, we 
)undingly hard-hitting approach contend, is more deserving, and we 




;omized by such .statements as: 
I believe you can't be a Re- 




are hopeful that the well known 
director, Mr. Harry Lemer, will not 
tamper with the beloved image. 

Several of the older categories 
should go to a couple of interest- 
ing gentlemen who somewhat per- 



plexingly combine a number of pro- 
fessions in common — food-vending, 
the law, and politics. 

Of course they are Harold Dobbs, 
whose name we place in nomina- 
tion for Best Art Direction (of 
himself), and Eugene McAteer, 
who is deserving of nothing less 
than Best Western Actor. 

AND NOW WE ARE FAIRLY 
quivering with excitement so pure 
and unabated and so entirely won- 
derful because we are on the brink 
of rare critical discovery. We have 
decided on the one person who 
should walk away with Best Actor 
of the Year honors. 

He is — can you wait ? — none 
other than that tremendous per- 



son whose performance is becom- 
ing increasingly marked by such 
unleavened power and drive that 
he is out-distancing every other 
role-player for miles and miles 
around. 

He is — do you find the suspense 
just too much? — our own George 
Christopher, a man whose perform- 
ance must be termed merely super- 
lative. 

(Continued on Page 14) 



EDMUND "PAT" BROWN 
Governor 

Ucan candidate and a John 
:h Society member at the same 



ITY-COUNTY RECORD 

ie Magazine of Good Goyernmeitt 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor .ind Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 



FEBRUARY 

OLUME 2y 



MARCH, 1962 
NUMBER 



Have you tried . . . 



The Delicious Buffet 

at the 

Whitcomb Hotel 

served from 11:.^0 to $2:00 P. M. Monday through Friday 
in the delightful Vienna Tavern — all you wish to eat . . . 

$1.50 incl. tax 

If you arc planning a banquet or a dance, stop by the 
Whitcomb and let a member of the staff show you the 
Vista Room, Crystal Ballroom or one of the many smaller 
banquet rooms ready for your use. 

For overnight guests, newly decorated rooms, many with 
television, provide comfortable accommodations conveni- 
ent to the San Francisco City Hall plus the ease of free 

parking. 




WHITCOMB HOTEL 

MARKET at NINTH 
UNderhill 1-9600 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Lvcn most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If youVe a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still 6nd a tour ex' 
citing, informative, entertaininR. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver'guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 
low. 

V-Drives, 

Limousines t 

Charter Buses 

available 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
Yukon 6-4000 



IRU.ARY- MARCH, 1962 




14 OFFICERS OF I 

S. F. FIRE DEPARTMEf 
RECEIVE AWARDS 

Fourteeen Officers and Firer 
of the San Francisco Fire Depi 
ment were presented with cer 
cates and cash awards for me 
orious performances in hne of d 
on Wednesday, February 14, 1! 

The presentation weis made 
Mayor George Christopher, in 
office, at the City Hall, at 3:30 f 
Commission President Dr. Petei 
Angel, Vice President Philip Din 
Commissioner Bert Simon a 
Chief of Department William 
Murray attended. 

Chief's Operator Charles E. Wl 
had the Class "A" Rainey M( 
for bravery bestowed upon 1: 
The Class "A" medal is rai 
awarded. 





Photii l.,\- CHK'r UliRX. 


ilTirial l>ll..t..Brai.li. r 


.SFFli 


Cash 




Class of 


Cash 


Value 


Name 




Value 


572.36 


Fireman Wlliam H. French 


Ti-uck 6 C 


262.81 


458.17 


Lieut. Daniel Harrington 


Salvage Co. 2 D 


152.72 


45S.17 


Fireman Robert S. Porter 


Engine !l D 


131.411 


394.21 


Fireman Paul . Suez 


Truck 2 D 


131.411 


3!I4.21 


Fireman .Jack W. Dragro 


Truck 2 D 


131.411 


3!I4.21 


Fireman Robert W. Gerhow 


Truck 10 D 


131. 4U 


256.66 


Fireman William Siebert 


Engine 6 D 


131.4(1 



Following are the award recipients: 

Cla: 
Name Av 

Chief '.s Oiierator Charles E. White Dist. 5 
Lieutenant Hh-nest N. Reddick Truck 12 

Lieutenant Lawrence Nihill Re.scue Squad 2 
Fir.-niu]i .lohn E. Putman Truck 3 

Fir.nian Theo. J. Dal Broi Truck 7 

Fireman .Jame.s V. Costello Truck 7 

Fireman Eugene A. Allen Rescue Squad 2 

This represents the largest group ever to be so honored for meritorious acts performed within one year. 
Their outstanding exploits contributed to the combined saving of the lives of 12 of San Francisco's resi- 
dents from death by fire or other emergencies. The individual performances, as reported, investigated, and 
evaluated before Fire Commission approval, make exciting and fabulous reading. 




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LADIES' AND GENTS' ALTERATIONS 

and KNIT BLOCKING A SPECIALTY 

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LA PERLA MARKET 

MEXICAN SPECIALTIES - TORTILLA FACTORY 

MANUEL MANOZ, Manager 
222 Lux Ave. JU. 9-3830 So. San Francisco 



MERRILL'S DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT 

1091 MARKET ST. 805 MARKET ST 

San Francisco, California 



BELL'S JEWELERS 

Specialty 

WATCH, CLOCK and JEWELRY REPAIR 

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Contractors Store Fronts — Interiors 
Manufacturers Store Equipment — Showcases 

SAN FRANCISCO 24, CALIFORNIA 



San Francisco Department of Electricity 

Donald 0. Townsend, Clntf^' 

APR 2 mi 



By DEAN ST. DENNIS IZ, '"^nr.^ 



rhe San Francisco Department 

Electricity will be 100 years old 

1963 — but the city-county agen- 

and its employes probably will 

le little time for a birthday cele- 

tion. 

i'or if next year is like the pres- 

year and those in the past, the 
lartment's workers will be flimg 
oughout the city maintaining 
16 of San Francisco's most vital 
vices. 

!very time a motorist passes a 
ffic signal, for instance, he is 
erving the department's work. 
Lnd each time the motorist pulls 
beside a parking meter and 
ps in a coin he is utilizing an- 
er service maintained by the 
artment. 

!ven more important is the de- 
tment's work in creating and 
intaining the vital communica- 
is networks of the police and 

departments here, 
"he alarms that send fire en- 
es screaming off into the night 

carried along lines set up by 

department. And the depart- 
it performs a comparable func- 
I when crackling radio messages 
ttle police cars to the scene of 
k robberies, holdups, and burg- 
es. 

ill of this work — and more — is 
formed by a handfull of 107 
ployes now on the department's 
;ers. 

'he department's chief, Donald 
Townsend ( he will get a new 
I July 1 — geneial manager), 
I he hopes to get five more 
>loyes if his request for a $1,- 
,664 budget is approved for 
next fiscal year. 

.s small as the department is 
ipared to the huge list of duties, 
i still far larger than when it 
1 started in 1863 as the city 
ncy designated to set up police 

fire alarm systems here. 
; was known for years as the 
eau of Fire Alarm and Police 
igraph, and was administered 
1 joint board of police and fire 
mi.ssioners. 
ut over the years, the name 

changed as the duties of the 
irtment were expanded. 




DONALD O. TOWNSEND 
Department Chief 

Today, the department has set 
up — or is putting the finishing 
touches on — new radio communica- 
tions systems for both the police 
and fire departments. 

The department installs and 
maintains the radio equipment — 
and the heart of the system is in 
the department's radio station on 
Twin Peaks. 

In addition to this, the depart- 
ment maintains 1830 fire alarm 
boxes and 450 police call boxes, 
and is currently installing an aux- 
iliary fire alarm system in the 
city's schools. 

"We do all the design, mainten- 
ance, and operation of all radio 
systems for San Francisco — e.xcept 
for one Public Utilities Commission 
power project," Townsend said. 

One of the department's trickiest 
jobs is now nearing completion — 
the transfer of radio equipment 
from the old to the new Hall of 
Justice — while maintaining full 
service until the transfer is com- 
pleted. 

While many department em- 
ployes are kept busy with radio 
work and alai'm systems, others 
oversee the city's 12,500 parking 
meters and the meters sometimes 
prove to be a major headache. 



The workers maintain and repair 
111.- meters, and discover that an 
average of 2000 a month have been 
deliberately jammed by motorists 
with gum, paper clips, and wads 
of paper. 

Townsend said the jammed met- 
ers not only cost the city in lost 
i-evenue, but cause the department 
many, many man hours a month 
in repair work. 

"Once we reached 4000 jammed 
meters a month. We have never 



been able to get it down below 
2000 — despite the convictions of 
some of those who jammed them," 
Townsend said. 

Last January, for instance, 2460 
meteis were jammed — including 
more than 200 in the city's finan- 
cial district. 

The department keeps a file on 

each individual meter. This is done, 

Townsend said, to provide a check 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Marsh &e. McLeivivajv- 

COSGROVE & COIVIRAIVY 

Insurance Brohers 

CONSULTING ACTUARIES 
AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 

One Bush Street • San Francisco 
523 Central BIdg. • Oakland 

Chicar/o. New York, San Francisco. Minneapolis. Detroit, 
Los Anyeles, Boston, St. Louis, Philadelphia. Pittsburnh. 
Seattle, Indianapolis,, St. Paul, Porthind. Buffalo, Duluth. 
Tulsa, Atlanta, Miami, New Orleans. Mihvaukee. Phoenix, 
Cleiwland. Kalmazoo, Charleston. Oakland, San Diecjo, 
Richmond, Montreal. Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, Ed- 
monton, Winnipcy. Caracas. London — with representation 
also in other parts of Central and South America, Europe, 
South Africa and Au.stralia. 



G. 


W. THOMAS DRAYAGE AND RIGGING CO., INC. 




GENERAL DRAYING 


FREIGHT FORWARDING 

A 

'■ 114- 14th STREET 


k 


}Mf 


HEmlock 1-9624 
San Francisco 


1^ ^m 



RUARY- MARCH. 1962 




HOME SCHEDULE, 1962 



APRIL 


10 


Tues. — Milwaukee 


11 


Wed. — Milwaukee (N) 


12 


Thurs. — Milwaukee 


13 


Fri. — Cincinnati (N) 


14 


Sat. — Cincinnati 


15 


Sun. — Cincinnati 


16 


Mon. — Los Angeles (N) 


17 


Tues. — Los Angeles 


27 


Fri. Chicago (N) 


28 


Sat. — Chicago 


29 


Sun. Chicago (Double) 


30 


Mon. — Pittsburgh 


MAY 




1 


Tues. — Pittsburgh 


2 


Wed. — Pittsburgh 


3 


Thurs. — Pittsburgh 


15 


Tues. — St. Louis (N) 


16 


Wed. — St. Louis 


17 


Thurs. — St Louis 


18 


Fri. — Houston (N) 


19 


Sat. — Houston 


20 


Sun. — Houston (Double) 


23 


Wed. — Philadelphia (N) 


24 


Thurs. — Philadelphia 


25 


Fri. — Philadelphia (N) 


26 


Sat. — New York 


27 


Sun. — New York (Double) 


JUNE 




15 


Fri. — St. Louis (N) 


16 


Sat. — St. Louis 


17 


Sun. — St. Louis 


19 


Tues. — Houston (N) 


20 


Wed. — Houston 


22 


Fri. — Milwaukee (N) 


23 


Sat. — Milwaukee 


24 


Sun. — Milwaukee 


25 


Mon. — Cincinnati 


26 


Tues. — Cincinnati (N) 


27 


Wed. — Cincinnati 


28 


Thurs. — Philadelphia 


29 


Fri. — Philadelphia (N) 


30 


Sat. — Philadelphia 



LIST OF OUR BOX OFFICES: 

ROOS/ATKINS 

Tenth 8C K Streets, Sacramento, Calif. 

ROOS/ATKINS 

Market 8C Stockton Sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

ROOS/ATKINS 

Santa Clara 8C First Sts., San Jose, Calif. 

JOE FERRARA'S "TROC" RESTAURANT 

3565 Geary Blvd., San Francisco, Calif. 

ABE ROSE SPORTING GOODS 

1742 Franklin Sts., Oakland, Calif. 

CRAIGIE & JENSON MOTORS 

1 1 South Soscol Avenue, Napa, Calif. 



Follow your Giants at Candlestick 



HOME SCHEDULE, 196! 



Sun. — Philadelphi, 



4 


Wed. — New York (Double) 


5 


Thurs. — Los Angeles 


6 


Fri. — Los Angeles (N) 


7 


Sat. — Los Angeles 


8 


Sun. — Los Angeles 


AUGUST 


1 


Wed. — Chicago 


2 


Thurs. — Chicago 


3 


Fri. — Pittsburgh (N) 


4 


Sat. — Pittsburgh , 


5 


Sun. Pittsburgh 1 


6 


Mon. — Philadelphia ■ 


7 


Tues. — Philadelphia 1 


8 


Wed. — New York (N) 1 


9 


Thurs. — New York 


10 


Fri. — Los Angeles (N) 


11 


Sat. — Los Angeles 


12 


Sun. — Los Angeles 


28 


Tues. — Milwaukee (N) 


29 


Wed. — Milwaukee 


30 


Thurs. — Milwaukee 


31 


Fri. — Cincinnati (N) 


SEPTEMBER 



Chicago (N) 



Tues. 


— Pi' 


ttsbu 


rgh 






Tues. 


— St 


, Lou 


is (N) 






Wed. 


— St. 


Lou 


is 






Thurs 


. — s 


t. Lo 


uis 






Fri. — 


• Hou 


ston 


(N) 






Sat. - 


- Hou 


ston 








Sun. - 


- Hoi 


jston 








Doublehead 


ers 


10:30 


A. 


M. 


Night 


Gam 


es 


8:15 


P, 


.M. 


Day G 






1:00 


P. 


M. 






THE RECO 



Around and About 



By WHIT HKNKY 

)ME YEARS AGO at the old Press Club in San P'rancisco I met 
a ninn who has become a living legend; to many he is known as 

Las Vegas. In private life, of which he has very little, he is Abe 
iller. Vice President of the Flamingo Hotel of Las Vegas, and 
bassador of Goodwill for the whole State of Nevada. He uses a 
sr dollar as a calling card and garners plenty of attention wherever 

;oes in his expensively embroid- 

1 cowboy suits. y^^'" '° '^^'^ ^^'^ Wild West show.s 

riginally from Detroit, he is »" over the country and combining 
irded as the most favorably business with pleasiue, he makes 
mi of all those who focus at- "^^ny radio and television appear- 
ion on our sister state to the anees to thump the tubs not only 
for the Flamingo Hotel but for all 
jhlller is an indefatigable work- of Las Vegas. 

or any worthy charity, and one In his travels, some rather un- 
lis favorites is the March of usual honors have been bestowed 
les; in line with this is the upon Mr. Las Vegas. For instance, 
iwing story: one summer at the Calgary Stam- 

t the time of President Eisen- pede to his collection of western 
er's inauguration, Abe Schiller sombreros was added a most gor- 
tmpanied by the Sheriff's Posse, geous feathered head-dress. This 
:ended on the nation's Capitol was an authentic war bonnet pre- 
ying five thousand silver dol- sented to him when he was made 
, with the full intention of a fuU-fledged Indian Chief of the 
wing out his "calling cards" Sarcees Tribe, an honor rarely be- 
le gathered throng. Fortunate- stowed upon a white man. The 
lowever. the District of Colum- beautiful and sacred ceremony was 
police learned of the plan and performed while motion picture and 

an immediate stop to it for television cameras ground merrily 
someone would be trampled away recording the event for pos- 
er the horses hooves. Non- terity in true Twentieth Centiuy 
sed, but not for long, Mr. Las Fashion. 

as gave the matter a little Along with his tremendous in- 
ight and then sent out wires to terest in sports, naturally Mr. Las 
newspapers, television stations, Vegas is a prize-fight enthusiast of 

editors and still cameramen the first water on hand for all big 
. the five thousand silver dol- bouts, and this brings to mind the 

would be given away on the Moore-Marciano fight a few years 
iS of the United States Treas- ago in New York when, in some 

the ne.xt morning. Naturally, mysterious way, out of the thou- 
enormous crowd gathered and sands upon thousands of spectators 
the cameras started to grind, seated in the stadium, Mr. Las 
iller announced amid cheers Vegas managed in his big white 
;, inasmuch as the March of hat and western attire to attract 
les drive was on, the Five Thou- the attention of one of the an- 
i Dollars was being donated to nouncers who promptly introduced 
Infantile Paralysis Fund. him, coast-to-coast, as "Abe Schill- 

eing an avid rodeo fan, Abe er, of the Flamingo Hotel, Las 
vels thousands of miles each (Continued on Page 12) 



Thomasser & Associates 

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GR. 4-7005 
San Francisco 



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CLAUEXCE N. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



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NEptune 2-4343 



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2150 hyde street 



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GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

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Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



BIZON'S Used Furniture 

Furniture Bought & Sold 

856 McAllister Street 

FI. 6-6605 


The BUNGALOW FLORIST 

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Specializing in Funeral Design 

Weddings - Corsages - Cut Flowers - Plants 

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PL. 5-3718 COLMA 


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Complete Automotive Service 

SUPPLIES — TIRES 
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TELETRONICS 

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iRUARY - MARCH, 1962 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Georgre Christopher. Mayor 

John r>. Sullivan. Kxeiutivc Sctrptary 
Robert M. Snialley. Conliiiential Seeretary 
Margaret Smith. Personal Secretary 
John L. Mootz. Administrative Assistant 
Robert Rockwell, Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS. BOARD OF 

235 Cltv Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Peter Tamaras. President. 1020 Harrison 
William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 
UoKer Boas. 2323 C.eary St. 
Joseph M. Casey. 2528 Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. riohbs. 351 California St. 
nr. Charles A. Ertc.ia. 253 Columbus Ave. 
John J. Ferdon. 155 Monteomery St. 
James L. Hallev. R70 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 
Jack Morrison. 25!)0 Creenwich St. 
Joseph R. Tinney. 2517 Mission St. 

Robert J. Polan. Clerk 

T>illlan M. Renter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — Boas, Blake, 

Casey 
County. State and National Affairs — Perdon. Dobbs, 

McMahon 
Education. Parks and Recreation — Brtola, Blake. 

Finance. Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs. Ferdon, 
Halley 

Judiciary. Lefjislative and Civil Service — Tinney. 
McMahon, Morrison 

Police — Casey. Ertola, Tinney 

Public Buildings. Lands and City Planning — Mor- 
rison. Boas. Tinney 

Public Health and Welfare— McMahon, Halley, Mor- 
rison 

Public Utilities— Halley. Dobbs. Perdon 

Streets and Highwavji — Blake, Boas, Ertola 

Rules — Tamaras, Dobbs, Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall KL 2-1910 

Russell L. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

206 City Hall HE 1-1322 

Thomas M. O'Connor 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

880 Bryant St. KU 3-9111 

Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

850 Bryant St. KL, 3-1671 

Edward T. Mancuso 

SHERIFF 

331 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Matthew C. Carberry 
TREASURER 

IIU City Hall HE 1-2121 

John J. Goodwin 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR. JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor, City Hall 
John B. Molina ri. Presiding 
Raymond J. Arata 
Carl H. Allen 
Byron Arnold 
Walter Carpeneti 
C. Harold Caulfleld 
Melvyn I. Cronin 
Norman Elkington 
Timothy J. Fitzpatrkk 
Joseph Karesh 
r-.erald S. I^vin 

Joseph M. Cur 

480 City Hall 



UN 1-S552 
Francis McCarty 
Edward Molkenbuhr 
Clarence W, Morris 
Harry J. Neubarth 
Raymond J. O'Connor 
Edward F. O'Day 
Charles S. Peery 
George W. Schonfeld 
William F. Traverso 
Alvin B. Weinberger 
LI. A. van der Zee 
Secretary 

UN 1-8552 



MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 
Third Floor. City Hall 

Andrew J. Eyman. Prcsldii 

Albert A. Axelrod 

John W. Bussey 

Robert J. Drewcs 

Bernard B. Gllckfeld 

Clayton W. Horn 

James M. Cannon. Sec 
301 City Hall 



IK Leiand J. L,azarus 



ciai 



■ A. Lil 



George E. Malonev 
William A. OBrien 
Lenore D. Underwood 
James J. Welsh 
etary 

KL, 2-3008 



A- C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



I TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

S5I1 Hryant St. Kl, 2-:illli8 

JaTnes Leddy. Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-S552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
William McDonnell. Foreman 
Dr. Donald Schulz. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Slatlsfician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTIVIENT 

880 Bryant St. KL 3-9111 

John D. Kavanaugh, Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser. 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connollv. 399 Fremont St. 
William Moskovitz. 5030 Geary Blvd. 
Robert A. Peabody. 456 Post St. 
Adolph L. Plerotti. 240 LTpland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5740 

Thomas P. Strycula, 

Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 

JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 446 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger, 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
Rev. James B. Flynn. 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green. 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2S9 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook. Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

-Maurice Khean 

940 - 25th St. N.W.. Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE. STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Clear.v 
Hotel Senator, Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin HI 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach. President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley. M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Neil Sinton. 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagopian. 220 Bush St. 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson, 2835 Vallejo SL 

William E. Knuth. 1600 Holloway Ave. 

Joseph Esherick. 2065 Powell St. 

Burton Li. Rockwell. 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President. California Palace Legion of Hono 
President. City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public L,lbrar>- Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H, Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 IjJirkin St. HE 1- 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 

Gardner W. Meln. Pres., 315 Montgomery St. 

Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. 

James S. Kearney. 400 North Point 

Mrs. Charles B. Porter. 142 - 27th Avenue 

George Thomas Rockrise. 405 Sansome St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller, Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall HE 1- 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Wm. Kilpatrick. President, 827 Hyde St. 
Richard C. Ham, 200 Bush St. 
Hubert J. Sober. 155 Montgomery St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 

DISASTER CORPS 

850 Bryant St. KL 3- 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.), Director 
Alex X. McCausland, Public Information Office 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3- 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P,M.. 
170 Fell St. 

Samuel Ladar. President. Ill Sutter St. 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper. Jr., 10 Walnut St. 
Adolfo de Urioste, 512 Van Ness Ave. 
Edward Kemmitt. 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Claire Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 
James E. Straiten. 800 Presidio Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt. of Schools and S( 



FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hail UN 1- 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

Dr. Peter Angel. President. 1867 - 15th Ave. 

Bert Simon, 1.350 Folsom St. 

Philip DIndia. 536 Bryant St. 

William P. Murray. Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes. Chief, Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook, President. 220 Montgomery £ 

George W. Cuniffe, 1627 - 25th Ave. 

Donald M. Campbell, M.D.. 977 Valencia St. 

Prank J. Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave. 

Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Robert E. Hunt, Claims Supervisor 
Lyle J. O'Conneli, Executive Director 



Ex-Offi< 



Members 



Chairman. Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3- 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jacob Shemano, Chairman, 130 Montgomery St, 

Charles R. Greenstone, 182 Second St. 

Solomon E. Johnson, 704 Market St. 

Charles J. Jung, 622 Washington St. 

Joseph P. Mazzola. 1621 Market St, 

John W. Beard, lixecutive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 

John B. Sullivan, Chairman. 69 West Portal 
Arthur S. Becker, 3475 California St. 
Donald Magnin, 77 O'Parrell St. 
G. Baltzer Peterson. 2910 Vallejo St. 
David Thomson. 65 Berry St. 

Vinlng T. Fisher. General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole. Secretary 



ERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

227 City Ilnll HE 1-2121 

Mi'i'ts every Wednesdny nt .•!:no P.M. 

Mux Mociio, President 
■illliim H. H. Dnvls. Wi Knisnm St. 
eorK.' CJIIlln. 4091 - 19th Ave. 
larence J. Walsh. 2450 - 17th St. 
Srne.st Tj. West. 2C,') MontRomery St. 

J. Kdwin Maltox. Kxecutive Se.r.liir.v 

OLICE COMMISSION 

850 Mryiml St. Kl, ::-(ll2;i 

Meets every Monday at 5:00 P.M. 
honia.s J. Mellon. President, 390 First St. 
Aul A. HLsslnser. 41B Sansome St. 
:arold U. McKlnnon, 255 California St. 

Thnriia.s J. Cahiil. Chief of Polite 
Alfred J. Nelder. Deputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas Zarapoza. Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel P. McKlem, Chief of Inspectors 
Lt. Wm. J. O'Brien, Commission Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler. Department Secretary 

UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

HE 1-2121 
th at 3:30 P.M. 
homa-f W. S. W'u, n.D.S.. President 
»hn M. Bransten. G65 - 3rd St. 
7. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 
ose M. Fanucchl, 1445 Stockton St. 
tortinier Ki.i.-;hhacker. Jr.. 601 California St. 
[arKnret V. Cirdner. 2130 Fulton St. 
Dhn I'^. Curich. 300 Montgomery St. 
fllton K. I,epetioh. 1655 Polk Street 
[rs. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 
,ev. William Turner. 1642 Broderick St, 



i;iO ( 



St. 



UBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
tuart N. Greenberp:. President. 765 Folsom St. 
on Fazackerley, Sol Howard St. 
eorge F. Hansen. 215 Market St. 
homas P. White, 400 Brannan St. 
homas F. Stack. 703 Market St. 



Bureaus and Departments 
Dcounts, 2S7 City Hall HE 1-2121 

George Negri, Director 
irport, San Francisco International, S. F. 2S 

Beiford Brown. Manager PL 6-0500 

etch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Ural U Moore. Gen. Mgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 

unicipal Railway, ;I49 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Vernon \V. Anderson, General Manager 
ersonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
ubiic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
'ater Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner. General Manager 

UBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
685 Bush St. 



rank H. Sloas. President. 351 California St, 
r. Xavier Barrios. 2325 Ocean Ave. 
re. Margaret R. Murray. 1306 Portola Drive 
milam P. Scott. Jr.. 249 Natoma St. 
icqueline Smith. 2015 Steiner St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public '^\'elfarc 

Mrs, Eulala Smith, Secretary 

ECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4S66 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 

'alter A. Haas. Sr.. Pre.sldenl. 98 Battery St. 

eter Bercut. 1333 Jones St. 

[ary Margaret Casey. 532 Mission St. 

William M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

r. Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

rs. Joseph J. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 

ahn F. Conway. Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell, General Manager 
Paul X. Moore, Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gal.- Ave. UN 3-7750 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Everett Griffin, Chairman. 465 California St. 
James B. Black, Jr.. 120 Montgomery St. 
James A. Folger. HI. 101 Howard St. 
Walter P. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
I,awrence R. Palacloa. 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman, Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

4.1II .McAllister SI. HE 1-2121 

M.'il.s every Wednesday at 2 P.M. 
.Martin K. Worrnuth, I'residillt, 4109 Pacheco 
James .M. Crane, 3:13 Montgomery St. 
James M. Hamill, 120 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Diez. 2251 - 3Bth Ave. 
William T. Reed, 2151 - 18th Ave. 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secret.iry 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA 1-0600 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Frederic Campagnoli. President. 300 Montgomcr>' 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Frank A. Flynn. 1549 Noriega St. 
Prentis C. Hale, Jr., 867 Market St. 
George T. Davis. Ill Sutter St. 
Sam K. HarrLson. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson. 19 Maywood Drive 
Wilson Meyer, 333 Montgomery St. 
Guido J. Musto, 535 North Point 
Samuel D. Savad. 35 Aptos Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 

B. Lawrence George, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE l-:ii40 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Raymond L. Bozzini, Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 

Frank J. O'Conneli, Market Master MI 7-9423 

CORONER 

.S50 Bryant St. KL 3-1694 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Dovle L. Smith, Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
" tenance UN 1-8000, Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk-Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin J. Mongan, 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 167 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

L. J. LeGuennec, 150 Otis 

HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEmlock 1-2121. Ext. 704 
Harry I. Bigarani. 1384 York St. 
Lloyd Conrich, 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward DuUea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnin. Stockton & O'Farrell 
Frank B. Oman, 557 - 4th St. 

Bernard A. Cummings, Secretary, 254 City Hall 

Ex-Officio Members; 

James R, McCarthy. Director of City Planning 

Irwin J. .Mussen. Urban Renewal Co-ordinator 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Currj-. Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassier Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr Szu T, Tsou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

I-ouis A Moran. Superintendent MO 4-1580 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

rir, T. E. .\lbers. Superintendent MI 8-S200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Bhik,-. Adm, Sui.. rinlendcnt HE 1-2800 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 



J60 City Hall 
Reuben H. Owens, Director 
R. Brooks Jjarter. 

Assistant Director, Admlnlstratlv 



HE 1-2121 



Asst. Director. Mainte 



and operations 



Bureaus 
unta, 2C0 City Hall 



HE 
HE 1 



J. J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 265 City Hall 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 4.-,ii .M.-Alllster St. HE 1 

Robert (?. Ix'vy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army HE 1 

A If. Ek.nlierg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. 450 McAlll.sl.r St. HE 1 

Sidii.-.v l''r,inklln. Supervisor 
Egineering. 3.'-|9 citv Hall HE 1 

(-lirr.iril .1. G.-.rtz. Cilv Engineer 
Sewer Repair £ Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army 

Walter l;, .l..nes. Superintendent HE 1 

Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. HE 1 

Hcrniird M. Crotly, Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. HE 1 

F. n. Brown. Superintendent 
Urban Renewal. 450 Mc^AlilMler St. HIO 1 

H.rnard A. I'uriimings. Analyst 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall HE I- 

Hen H.nas, Purcha.ser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway. Chief A.ssistant 
Purcliaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies. 15th and Harrison Sis. 

J. K. Leary. Supervisor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 50 

George Slanky. Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Philip Tj. Rezos. Director of Property 
James T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr. 



-2121 
2121 

-2121 
2121 

-2121 

■2121 

St. 

-2121 

-2121 

-2121 

-2121 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-5100 

Dr, Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April, June, Oct. 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President. 
2 Pine St. 

.\lexander de Bretteville, Honorary Member, 2000 
Washington St. 

Mrs. C. Tobin Clark, House on Hill, San Mateo 

William W. .Mein. Honorary Member, 315 Montgom- 
ery St. 

Mrs. Alexander Albert. 2320 Lyons St. 

Joseph M. Bransten, 665 - 3rd St. 

Walter E. Buck, President, 235 Montgomery St. 

E. Raymond Armsby, 111 Sutter St. 

Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 

Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 

Mrs. Bruce Kelham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 

Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 

David Pleydell-Bouverle. Glen Ellen. Calif. 

John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 

William R. Wallace. Jr.. 100 Bush St. 

Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 

Harold L. Zellerbach. 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation & Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe, Jr.. Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. April. June. Oct.. 2.30 P,M, 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs, George Cameron. Hruiorary President. 
Hillsborough 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Po.»t 

Miss Loul.se A. Boyd, 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

Charles de Young Thieriot. 1802 Florihunda, Hills- 
borough 

R. Gwin Follis. 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Heimbucher. 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 

Garrett .McEnernev. II. 444 California St. 

Koscoe F. Oakes. 220 Bush St. 

Joseph o. Tobin. 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker, Burllngame Country Club 

Charles Page, 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Filoll. San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation & Park Commission 
Ricbaril lllieem. Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalpine, Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

436 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. MA 1-1700 

Charles W. Friedrichs, Executive Secretary 



5BRUARY - MARCH, 1962 



D. O. TOWNSEND 

( Continued from Page 5 1 
on complaints by motorists who 
get parking tickets. 

If it turns out that the meter 
was not functioning properly, the 
courts usually quash the tickets, 
he said. 

Nearly 50 per cent of the de- 
partment's time is now spent on 
the traffic signals that have sprung 
up throughout the city. 

During the middle 1940s, the 
colorful bird-cage signals were the 
only ones in the city, and were at 
219 intersections. Then a conver- 
sion began to the present three- 
color lights. Today, there are sig- 
nals at 694 intersections and the 
number is growing. 

The depaitment is responsible 
for keeping them in operation and 
for making any alterations after 
installation. 

There is only one intersection — 
Pacific and Columbus — where the 
old bird-cage signals still stand. 
And Townsend said they will be 
coming down soon. 

"It will go out in the next few 
months," he said. "This is at our 
request. They are becoming a 
maintenance chore." A former 



FARMERS 

INSURANCE 

GROUP 

Bert Weible, District Manager 

2141 LOMBARD STREET 
JO 7-1860 



Gary's Auto Service 

Touring - AAA Auto Assn. Service 
General Auto Repairs 

3475 CHAMPION ST. 
KE 6-2165 Oakland, Calif. 



WHITE HOUSE 
FRENCH LAUNDRY 

J. p. CASSOU 

2549 Clay St. WEst 1-8073 
San Francisco 1 5 



chief of the department designed 
all of those old signals, and then 
department workmen built them. 

"In their day they were fine 
signals, but there wasn't enough 
flexibility to meet modem require- 
ments. In a few years I don't know 
what we're going to do with the 
ones we have." 

Townsend, who has 40 years of 
city service and has been the de- 
partment's chief for 10 years, said 
he thought the department would 
continue to grow — perhaps even 
more rapidly. 

For one things, he said, all as- 
pects of city-county communica- 
tions may one day come under the 
department — including all switch- 
boards and operators. 

For years, he said, grand juries 
have recommended that the depart- 
ment's name be changed to De- 
paitment of Communications in 
recognition of the new expanded 
duties. 

Townsend said the department is 
looking to the future in other ways. 
For instance, conduits for a closed- 
circuit television network were 
built into the ney Hall of Justice 
at the department's urging. And 
the day may come, he said, when 
the hall will be linked with other 
police stations across the country 
in televised showups of suspects 
taken into custody. 



BAYLACQ LAUNDRY 

FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Delivery 
Service 



116 Clement St. 
SK 1-0971 



Glen Hunter's Moving 

EXPRESS & TRANSFER 
Statewide 

Service 

3330 Ortega St. 

MO.41-2644 

LO 6-4300 




* Claude Bcrhouet and Claudine Berhouct, Props. 

Hotel de France 



BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 



780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone GA 1-6410 



— ^^^ 

STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

815 BRYANT ST. at 6th MArket 1-3063 

San Francisco 3, California 



DEIE11W,CATHER& COMPANY 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 



Public Transit 
Traffic & Parking 
Expressways 
Grade Separations 
Urban Renewal 



Subways 

Railroad Facilities 
Industrial Plants 
Municipal Works 
Port Development 



1256 Market Street 
San Francisco2, California 



Chicago 



Newark 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 

751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

SiveetheoH Hams and Bacon 

"Idaho Quality Fed Beef* 

Anderson & Perkins, Inc. 

Licensed QC Bonded — Bonded Correspondents at All Points 

Specialized Collection Service 

Phone EXbrook 2-8466 

31 GEARY STREET 

San Francisco 8 



CALIFORNIA WATER & TELEPHONE CO. 

300 Montgomery St. 
GArfield 1-4826 San Francisco 



THE RECORD! 



IS. p. MAZZOLA NAMED 
I HOUSING POST 

Joseph r. Mazzola. business 
inagei- for PUimbeis & Steam 
ters Local 38. was named to the 
n Francisco Housing Authority 
Mayor Christopher. 
Mazzola, 44, was sworn in at 
remonies at Christopher's office 
He succeeds the late Al F. Mail- 

IX. 

Mazzola and his wife. Vera, live 
127 Lakeshore Drive. They have 
children. Jo Anne. 21, and Law- 
ice, 18. 

Black & White Garage 

Public Parking & Storage 
AJaititetiancc & Lubrication 

955 POST STREET 

PR 5-9680 

SPARKLE 

Laundry-Cleaners 

2385 - 20th Ave. 
LO 4-2230 

Fillmore & Ellis 
KEY SHOP 

Losksmith — Keys Made 

1580 Ellis St. 

FI 6-3817 

RICHMOND 
NURSING HOME 

The Patients Welfare Aluays 
Our First Concern 

621 Clement St. SK 2-1628 

HAROLD ]. CASSIDY 
REALTY CO. 

A Complete Real Estate 
& Loan Service 



Electronic Training Laoratory 

All phases of Electronics, 
full or part-time 

Electronics-TV for Men-Women 

411 Broadway OL 8-5228 

OAKLAND 



HILL & CO. 

Realtor 

2107 UNION STREET 
WA 1-3040 

MABEL MINTON 
GUEST HOUSE 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9253 



GEARY MOTORS 




New 1962 Fords 


CARL N. SWENSON CO., INC. 


Highest Quality U.sed Cars 
Lowest Prices 


Contractors 


Lowest Down Payments 




Longest Terms 


• 


4700 GEARY BLVD. 




BA. 1-2500 


1095 STOCKTON AVENUE 


Custom-Aire 
Products 


Phone CYpress 4-3232 


Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 

Mfgrs. of Forced Air - Gas 

Fired Heaters & Wall Furnaces 

Air Conditioning 


• 
Post Office Box 558 


600 Indiana Street 


San Jose 6, California 


VA 6-7171 




Sunshine Rest Home 

24 Hour Care for Ambulatory 

Guests — Men & Women 

Elevator Service — Anne Murray 






719 - 36*ti Ave. SK 1-7705 


REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 


TOULOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 


Laundry & Cleaning 




821LincolnWay MO. 41634 


1600 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco 9, California 

PRospect 6-0880 

• 

VOLKSWAGEN 


RUTHIE'S SCHOOL OF DANCE 

specializing in Children's Dancing 

Expert Training — Tap, Ballet, 

Character 6? Acrobatic 

2229 Taraval St. OV 1-5226 


H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 

Instruments for Hand Surgery 

Active Hand & Finger Splints 

70- I2tli Street MA. 1-6876 


Victoria Pastry Co., inc. 

Italian and French Pastries 
and Confections 

Cakes for All Occasions 


— Distributors — 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - NORTHERN NEVADA - UTAH 


1362 STOCKTON STREET 
SU 1-2015 





BRUARY - MARCH. 1962 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 7 I 
Vegas. Nevada all in one breath. 
Such a mention as this, with tape 
recordings made in many different 
languages and sent all over the 
world, is said to reach actually bil- 
lions of people and this is no mean 
feat, even for a top press agent! 

Then there was the tinie tliat 
the entire New Years Day Rose 
Parade in Pasadena ground to a 
halt when a float broke down. It 
was later discovered that the float 
which "stall' d representee, Las 
Vegas, and, by som-o strange co- 
incidence, it had broken down right 
in front of a battery of televisijn 
cameras, which were recording the 
event cross-country for many mil- 
lions of viewers. The "break-down" 
had the unmistakable Schiller 
touch. 

Abe Schiller has been named the 
"Man of the Year" by the Inter- 
national Rodeo Association for the 
outstanding work he has done in 
publicizing rodeo as a high class 
and competitive .sporting event. He 
has for some years been very active 
in the Miss America Beauty Pag- 
eant in Atlantic City, and Miss 
America has appeared at the Fla- 
mingo on stage in the Tony Martin 



Show, His Rodeo activities have 
carried him throughout the United 
States and Canada. He was chair- 
man of the judging committee for 
Miss Rodeo America in Idaho. 
Montana, Illinois, Utah and Cali- 
fornia. Abe Schiller has ridden in 
Pasadena on New Year's Day and 
the Rose Festival Parade in Port- 
land, Oregon — he also rode in 15 
pai'ades thioughout the country 
and Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He 
has appeared on every major tele- 
vision network in the United 
States, including Jack Benny, Art 
Linkletter, Ralph Edwards and 
many others. He also spends con- 
siderable time addressing service 
groups and organizations, giving 
them an overall picture of Las 
Vegas. Nevada. Abe is a very avid 
sportsman, having appeared on 
coast-to-coast television shows at 
professional football games in De- 
troit, San Francisco, Los Angeles 
and Chicago. Abe Schiller is also 
an avid fisherman, having made 
three motion pictures on bass fish- 
ing on Lake Mead. 

Abe is the proud owner of the 
saddle once belonging to the late 
V^^illiam S. Hart. 

In a colorful city populated by 
colorful people, Abe is the most 
colorful of all. Abe, I salute you. 



Dana Giusti & Paoni 

Complete Travel Serrke 
Air & Steamship 

13 Columbus Ave. YU 6-5530 


TUNNELL MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits -Vegetables 

174 West Portal Ave. 

MO 4-7300 


SACRED HEART 
HIGH SCHOOL 

1075 Ellis St. 
San Francisco 


R & J Sheet Metal Co. 

1286 Sanchez St. 
VA 6-7330 


John L. Gilmore 
Realty Co. 

Let Us Sohe Your 
Real Estate Problems 

3497 Mission St. MI 8-8700 


COSTELLO APPLIANCE SERVICE 

Washers - Dryers - Dishnashcrs 

All Work Guaranteed 

City-wide Service 

240 - 10th Street 

BA 1-5775 


GRACE J. HILL 

"Custom Made Caps" 
for All Organizations! 

170 Naples St. JU 7-6143 


My Line Plumbing 
& Heating 

William Cazatt 
736 Larkin St. GR 4-7602 


B & b AUTU mm 

Complete Automotive 

Reconstruction 

639 Hyde St. GR 4-0878 

Ray Barrett, Prop. 


STOVALL'S 

Ladies^ & Gent's Tailoring 
Alterations - Valet Service 

510 Powell St. San Francisco 
GArfield 1-9285 Bill Stovall 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Ganshurg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

BURLINGAME, California 

North Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 

PETERSON SUPPLY CO. 

NEON SIGN SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 
480 Fifth Street DOuglas 2-1695 

San Francisco 7, California 

Pacific Coast Builders 

No. 1 South Park 
San Francisco 

OTAGIRI MERCANTILE CO., Inc. 

70 Pine Street — GA 1-8846 

San Francisco, California 



Basketball, Baseball, Football, Softball, Golf, Track, Tennis, Bowling 
Uniforms, Trophies 8C Medals, Ski Rentals, Hunting, Fishing 

FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 



1404 TARAVAL STREET 



S.in Francisco 16, Calil. 



MOntrose 1-1<)09 



GEORGE SCHARETG & SONS - Draymen 

SAN FRANCISCO 7 MI. 7-4932 

Office: 904 • 22nd STREET 



THE RECORI 



McGuire and Hester 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



796 ■ 66th Avenue 

Telephone Neptune 2-7676 

Oakland 21, California 



HtNRY IR\-|Ni 



Henry Irving Associates 



1428 IRVING STREET 
)V. 1-2100 San Francisco. Calif. 

FRED G. AINSLIE 

Real Estate & Insurance 

Notary Public 

346 Polk St. OR. 3-7400 



Gupta's Tender Trap 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

2064 POLK STREET 
GR. 4-9904 



Scannell Bros., Drayage 

Carroll Ave. and Ingalls 
VA. 4-2006 



MIKE'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Complete Automotive Service 

J 360 - 20th STREET 
VA. 4-2722 



Ml RANCHO Super Market 

Latin-American Foods 

1365 - 20th St. Ml. 7-0581 



MAR VISTA PHARMACY 

"Let Us Help Supply Your 

Family Needs" 

DAVID ZISKO, Prop. 

1035 Taraval St. OV. 1-1330 



TRICOLOR FRENCH RESTAURANT 

Dinner after 4 P.M. 

Closed Monday 

4233 GEARY BLVD. BA. 1-8707 



PRACTICE AT 

PORTOLA DRIVE GOLF RANGE 

New .ind Used Equipment 

9 A.M. CO 10 P.M. 

55 O'ShauBhncMv Blvd. SE. 1.5508 



Larry's Meat Market 

248 Divisadero Street 
tiear HAIGHT 

J. P. MANEn CO. 

BROKER 

Eggs - Butter ■ Meat 
2445 Mason St. PR. 1-2331 



Tokyo 1964 

Join the Olympic Savings Club 



FOR DETAILS VISIT OR 

CALL YOUR FRIENDLY 

SUMITOMO BANK 



THE SUMITOMO BANK 
of California 

An Anicriain B.ink 
Incorporated in Californi.i 

SAN FRANCISCO— 565 Calilorni., Si. 

Y'Ukon 1)565 

SACRAMENTO— 1400 - 4th Street 

Gilbert 5-4611 



INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY 

General Office: CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

MOTOR TRUCKS 

Address Reply to: BRANCH SALES OFFICE 

hlO Braiinaii Street - — San Franicsc 7, California 



MArket 1-1400 



Free Estimate.s 



TED'S Auto Body & Fender Repair 

T. F. SANCHEZ 
1570 WALLER STREET San Francisco 17, California 



CARAVAN LODGE 

Visit the Newly Decorated SABRE ROOM 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE - RESTAURANT 

601 Eddy Street San Francisco Phone PR 6-1380 

BAY ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CORP. 

Electrical Contractors 

761 CLEMENTINA STREET 
Phone UNderhill 3-5595 San Francisco 3, Calif. 

The Bank of TOKYO 
of California 

San Francisco 
64 Sutter Street YU 1-1200 



MARINA SEA & SKI-RENTALS, SALES and REPAIRS 



SKI 



Vnu .ARE CORDIALLY INVITED t>i 
Ski Shop, featuring all Top Lir 



t S.in Fran.i.-.-./s N.wcsl and M,.»[ Uiii.|.i 
1 CLOTHING and EQUIPMENT. 



DON CAPPA, Manager 
OPEN MONDAY THRU FRIDAY— 10 TO 9 — SATURDAY— 10 TO 6 

1909 Union Street— Near Laguna 



BRUARY . MARCH. 1962 



BAY WINDOW 

(Continued from Page 3) 
ACTUALLY. NOW. WE AFiE 
confidently informed by our high- 
ly poHshed crystal ball that George 
will make it to Sacramento no mat- 
ter who else win.s in the great Os- 
car sweepstakes next November. 





MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 

And whether it is Pat or Dick, we 
will see George firmly enscounced 
in the Lieutenant Governor role. 
And it is a fine one for scene- 
stealing! 

It was particularly significant 
to see the effortless manner in 
which he performed before the re- 
cent California Republican Assem- 
bly. He was awarded top honors 
over such well known Volimteers 
for Better State Government as 
Mr. Ni.\on and Mr. Kuchel and Mr. 
McCarthy. 

His was the biggest majority 
awarded — 291 votes to Nixon's 263 



J. EUGENE "Gene" McATEER 

and Kuchel's 220! As for poor Mr. 
McCarthy, the San Rafael gentle- 
man-legislator, he broke his lance 
badly in having at it with George 
and ended with a meager 149 votes. 

CALIFORNIA COUNTDOWN ? 
That's the name of an 8-page tab- 
loid -without the question mark; 
that we added — the first sick issue 
of which recently came out. Sick 
because it's so patently political 
that it hurts one's sensibilities just 
to look at the thing. 

Volume 1. Number 1 uses most 
of Page 1 and a considerable por- 
tion inside in telling about "Chris- 
topher's Giant Giveaway." Yes, 
friends, it's "Stoneham's Stadium, 
The Taxpayers' Loss." And the 
tired old story of the Mayor, Can- 
dlestick Park and the Henry North 
Grand Jury rumpus of 1958 is re- 
told. 

Particular relish was used in the 
Christopher vs. North squabble 



over the stadium. This, appearing 
just prior to the death of Mr. 
Ncirlh last month, is an example of 
Mic incredibly had taste u.sed 
Unoughout. 

YEAR OF THE TIGER: Well, it 
is reassuring to contemplate the 
Chinese New Year— the 4,660th— 
which we have now well entered. 
Reassuring if this is a harbinger 
of another 4,660 years; who knows, 
we might even achieve pea::e if 
given that much time. 

At any rate, it .shoidd be a good 
year for Recreation-Pavk Commis- 
sioner Peter Bercut, whose diugh- 
ter, Suzanne, won a close election 
as Queen of the Mardi Gras. 

And it is a good year already for 
Water Department Boss Jim Tur- 
ner whose reseivoirs, ooth here and 
in the mountains, look fatter, wet- 
ter and fuller than they hav? at 
any time during the last four years. 

But it probably isn't such a good 
year for that Municipal Judge 
whose golf-playing on weekday 
afternoons effectively squiched Pre- 
siding Judge Andrew Eyman's ef- 
forts to obtain more judges to man 
San Francisco's benches. When 
Governor Pat heard of the golfing, 
he decided to hold up on several 
new appointments authorized for 
our fair city. 



KOTZBECK GALLERIES 

Fine Prints - Expert Fr.iminf; 

Originals in Water Colors 
and Oils 



Edgar Meat Products Co. 

EDGAR WONG 

2943 MISSION STREET 

VA. 6-6830 



Primo R. Repetio 

General Insurance - Real Estate 

Notary 

321 Columbus Ave. 

EXbrok 7-1051 - 7-1052 

San Francisco 11 



"MAC -DAVID" 

RADIO & TV SERVICE 

Home Appliances 

1051 Polk St. TU. 5-175( 

Hunt's Quality Donuts 

MAIN BRANCH 



Other Locations: East Bay 
and Peninsula 



JOE'S 

TEXACO SERVICE 

Ocean and Alemany 

San Francisco 12, California 

JU. 5-3495 

Complete Automotive Service 

OPEN 24 HOURS 



BEST WISHES to Our 


SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS 


* 


looking forward to YOUR being the 


PENNANT WINNER this Year. 


* 


MAX SOBEL 



ORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




:HARLES a. ROGERS 
tegisfrar of Voters 

DEAN ST. DENNIS 

(AY WINDOW 
GROUND & ABOUT 

WHIT HENRY 

7EORGE CHRISTOPHER 
^ Biography 




MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



APRIL -MAY. 1962 



S. F. Chamher^Oldest in the 
West-Has U2th Birthday 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE the oldest 
Chamber in the West celebrated its 112th birthday on Wednesday, 
May 9. 

"The Year of Grace. 1850," according to an early chronicler of San 
Francisco history, "saw the birth of the Chamber, which may be said to 
have been incarnated by the crying necessity of the hour." 

The day the Chamber was officially organized also was the day 
the city's civil government was first formed, according to Colville's 
directory of 1856. 

"Instituted before California achieved statehiiod, the Chamber has 
iMvn intimately oonnecte<l with civic welfare and the expansion and 
developiiient of commerce, industry and business in San Francisco al- 
most .since the beginning of San Francis<'o's historj," Philip Di Giorgio, 
president of the Chamber, declared. 

The first recorded interest in fonning a Chamber came in a notice 
in the San Francisco Alta California, Augu.st, 1849. announcing a meet- 
ing at the old schoolhouse on what is now Portsmouth Plaza. One of 
the first men who formed the Chamber was Samuel Brannan, leader of 
the 1846 Mormon immigration to San Francisco who started the city's 
first newspaper, the California Star. 

.\t that time San Francisco was "a town of social turmoil, where 
thoasands of dollars nightly changed hands on the turn of a dice, where 
riot stalked broadca-st through the streets and each member of the 
comniunit}' was a law into himself and the gun his final argument and 
\erdict." 

At a meeting in the Merchant's Exchange Building, May. 9, 1850 — 
following the earlier organizational meeting in the city's first school- 
house on the Plaza— William Hooper, who became city treasurer and 
collector in 1846 and led a sweeping reform to "purify City Hall from 
partisan trickery" (according to the historian Bancroft I, was named 
the fiist Chamber president. 

One of the greatest of a great line of Chamber presidents was 
William Tell Coleman, the "Lion of the Vigilantes" who headed the 
Vigilance Committees of 1851, 18.56 and 1877 — pronounced "the most 
heroic figure in California history" by Rockwell D. Hunt in his Cali- 
fornia's Stately Hall of Fame. 

Josiah Royce, who came out of Grass Valley to become one of 
America's gieatest philosophers, noted the role played by the Chamber 
in stabilizing law and order in San Francisco in his book. California. 

"Business men chose to enlist their servces in the cause of good 
order by choosing the only alternative. They avoided mob law, pure and 
simple, only by organizing the most remarkable of all popular tribunals, 
the vigilance committee, whereby was effected that unique occurence- - 
a Business Man's Revolution." 



PRODUCTION, ELECTRONICS & 

AERO-DYNAMIC LODGE 1327 

L A. of M., AFL-CIO 




GONE UP! 

the cost-of-living 

has soared 126% 

in the past 

30 years! 



HELD DOWN! 

the price of PG&E gas 
and electricity is 
actually 8% less than 
it was 30 years ago! 



(Based on typical home 
use of gas and 
electricity) 



Of '^^"'•^e, yo^,^ r^y^^ uicgcr these days 
because you ^. ' ^G&E bill is "igs ^gry year 



:auseyouu3 "^^ ^''* '' ricity ^^^'^ ^^^^ 

• for better ijl'^^'"^ g^^ ^"'^ ^'^ •. ^^'^^'' "^'^"^ 
dishwasher and '"§' ^^' ^"^ 'ving appliances 
you add to maif" ^^^ °''^^'' ^'''"'^'^tiore enjoyable. 



"lak 



■s living easier a 

J^eific Gas ondEleeirie Company 



University of San Francisco 

UNDERGRADUATE and GRADUATE PROGRAMS . . . 

Liberal Arts. Business Adminislration, Lan, Science, Education, Nursing 
EVENING DIVISION SUMMER SESSION 

SAN ERANCISCO 17, CALIFORNIA 





I S BUMPERSTRIP TIME again, and 24-sheet, 6-sheet and quarter 
;ard time again, and the merry radio and television stations are 
ling into their political own again, and the top-priced politcal ads 

nmnig happily in the newspaper columns, and the campaigners are 
oroiisly reciting the ghost-written claims, charges and countei- 
■rges as they offer sure-fire cure-alls for every single State-wide 
blcm. . . . 

res. 'tis downhill time again as 
campaigners throw open the 
ottle in an eleventh-hour charge 
rard the Great November Dress 
learsal that occurs June 5. 
ris then, on that Tuesday in 
le. that the People having lived 

lo these many months with the 
netimes weird, sometimes wacky 
. most always wonderful cam- 
gning -enter the voting booths 
render a decision, 
'he spring warm-up season has 
m productive of some richly 
)table remarke by the cam- 
gners. Take Lieutenant Gover- 
• Anderson's affable charge that 
yor Christopher's attack on 

k-ernor Brown's $2.9 billion State Governor Edmund G. (Pat) Brown 
Iget is ■■nothing but inconsistent CHRISTOPHER'S A CINCH to 
1 transparent double talk! And .^ , .. , „ ,, „ 

■ , . . „ , »v, » .v,„ ride rough-shod over Fellow Re- 
ristopher s comment that the , ,. % , ,, ^_ ^,__ ^, __i 




deison charge "is just further 
lOf of his abysmal ignorance of 
: fiscal facts of life!" 
3ur good Mayor is certainly no 
anger to the fiscal facts of life, 
many a bloody-headed depart- 
nt executive can unhappily tes- 
f after the budget-bludgeoning 
ninistered by Candidate Chris- 
>her this year. In all. mayoral 
a in San Francisco depai-tment 
[ucsts totalled more than $18 
llion. 



publican Jack McCarthy, thus set- 
the stage for a head-one on- 



slaught on poor Anderson in No- 
vember. Being naturally k i n d - 
hearted and with a shy stomach to 
boot, we tremble as we contemplate 
the massive manner in which our 
George will bury Glenn in that 
election. ("Glenn" spelled with two 
"n"s is the first name of the cur- 
rent Lieut. -Gov., in the event you 
didn't know: we checked this in the 
Roster of Officials compiled an- 
nually by the Secretary of State, 
to assure accuracy.) 

The snow - balling Christopher 
State-wide popularity is undenia- 
ble. He's a hit in the hinterlands, 
and he's solid in the South. He 
charges in with vigor and enthu- 
siasm, presenting a front that is 
constantly increasing in presence 
and stature. And although consid- 
erable credit should go to seasoned 
campaign-director Scoop Wh.'..aker, 
the phenomenon is largely the re- 
sult of George himself. 

You may recall the time when it 
was Nixon as the No. 1 GOP man 
in the State, with Christopher as a 
No. 2 possibility. That's certainly 
changed. Nixon has gotten all 
mixed up with charges by Knight 



of an offered "deal" to get out. with 
similar charges by Shell, with fan- 
tastically poor press relations so 
poor that Time Magazine recently 
commented at length on this aspect 
of the campaign. 

Even Nixon's "Ciisis" book boom- 
eranged, while at the same time 
former S. F. Newsman George Dor- 
sey's "Christopher of San Fran- 
cisco" came out with a most fetch- 
ing account of the Christopher suc- 
I Continued on Page 14) 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

'be Magazine of Good Government 

San Frandsco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

APRIL-MAY, 1962 
VOLUME 29 NL'MBER ? 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

BURLINGAME, Californm 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Lven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex' 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 
low. 

U-Drires, 

Limousines^ 

Charier Buses 

available 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YTJkon 6-4000 



'RII, - MAY, 1962 





W. Harry Johns Files for 24th District 

ONE OF THE most frequented visitors aioimd the City Hall is a 
man, an aged brief case in hand, dropping in the Recorder's Office, 
Assessor's Office, or over to the Registrar of Voters; then checking 
some records with the Building Inspectors, or Cit.v Attorney's office, or, 
perhaps sitting in on a contro- 
versial Supervisor's session relat- 
ing to real estate. He can be seen 
in our Courtroom's third floors 
with Municipal Court matters, or 
the County Clerk's office research- 
ing local cases, then on up to the 
m ^^V Superior Courts on the fourth floor. 

j& ^Kt attending Court sessions and pio- 

Jj ^S^ ^^m^m \>a.\.e sales. 

*^ - "^ ^^» T This versatile figure has gained 

a wide knowledge of the public 
services available and accessable to 
the citizenry, and has taken full 
advantage of it. The use of the 
public records and systematic 
methods of maintaining the rec- 
ords can afford one a wide and 
variable knowledge on the subject 
of real estate. As such a citizen, 
he takes full advantage of the 
services available. 

All this is necessary, for in his 
work as a real estate broker, he 
must be familiar with the particu- 
lar i-eal property; the area; the 
zoning; the building codes applic- 
able to the subject property; the history of the property, and he must 
familiarize himself with any pending litigation affecting the property, 
or the owner; as a real estate educator, he seeks the same information 
to better conduct his real estate school; and the visits to the Law 
Library keeps him abreast of the laws, and the decisions as they are 
handed down by our higher courts twice weekly. 

W. Harry Johns is a San Franciscan since 1927. having spent some 
time in Detroit. Michigan, and as a child, in Turlock, California. Mr. 
Johns is a licensed real estate broker, operating his real estate business 
only a few steps away from the Cty Hall, at 322 Hayes Street. He has 
been conducting a School of Real Estate for the past two years at the 
same location. After two years of night Law School, Mr. Johns goes 
also, to the law library to concentrate on the cases dealing primarily 
with real estate, and its allied fields. He considers himself an authority 
on real estate law. The study of law has brought him close to the 
actual battle ground, that of trying cases in courts in propria personna. 
Last year three of his cases were decided by our District Court of 
Appeal. 

The educational background behind him, the challenege to bring 
this knowledge in actual practice to do the public good has enticed 
him to seek public life, through politics. 

Mr. Johns has filed his candidacy for the new 18th District as- 
semblyman, which includes the old 24th District, and part of the 19th. 
This district is the nucleus of San Francisco, comprising the City Hall 
area, the downtown, 'Westem Addition, Haight-Ashbury and some of 
Twin Peaks area. 

Mr. Johns is married, and a father of three boys, who have pledged 
their support. 



W. HL\KKY JOHNS 
Files for Assembly 



Pacific Coast Builders 

No. ] South Park 
San Franeiwco 



Thomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
LOnibard 4-0180 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

174S FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 3, CaliSornia 

UNderhill 1-14SS 

The Bank of TOKYO of California 

SAN FRANCISCO 
64 SUTTER STREET YU 1-1200 

Japan Center Branch of Bank of TOKYO 

BUCHANAN and SUTTER STS. FI 6-7600 

CALIFORNIA SAVINGS & LOAN CO. 

Our 75th Year 

M.nin Office - 46 GE.ARY STREET YU 63600 

Branch Office - 16th and MISSION STREETS . . . San Francisco 

Oakland- 1998 MOUNTAIN BLVD. 

San Leandro - BAY FAIR SHOPPING CENTER 



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SAN FRANCISCO INC. 

San Francisco International Airport 
Executive Aircraft Terminal 



San Francisco 28, California 



Telephone: JUno 3-8 500 



CHARLES A. ROGERS 

Registrar of Voters 



By DEAN ST. DENNIS 



■WE BUSIEST TIME of the year is here for San Francisco's Regis- 
. trar of Voters, Charles A. Rogers, and his staff. 

Rogers and the 23 permanent employees he supervises plus some 
temporary workers— are getting ready for the June 5 primary 
iction. 

But this year, in addition to the monumental load of normal work. 
lew problem has arisen for Rog- 
I, 

For each election, he said, the 
y employs about 4,500 persons 
staff the 1.300 polling places in 
n Francisco. 

'That is our biggest problem," 
gers said. "We have a hard time 
ding competent people to do this. 
is gives us a problem every 



Vow, he said, the situation has 
jwn worse. 

'Many of the people employed 
the precincts are elderly and a 
r percentage of them are wom- 
The recent street violence, and 
! publicity it has been given in 
■ newspapers, has caused quite 
ew person.s to cancel out. 
'They're afraid to be out on the 
eets, " Rogers said. 
3n election day, polls here close 
8 p.m., and it usually takes a 
IT hours more to finish counting 
s votes. Rogers said his office 
encountering- unusual difficulty 
obtaining enough precinct in- 
ictors- those who bring the vote 
lies and other voting materials 
;k to city hall after the polls 




CHARLES A. ROGERS 

S. F.'s Registrar of Voters 



'We need at least 200 inspectors 

V," Rogers said Othei-wise. Rogers said, prepara- 

•l' can't assure these people thev """« f°'" '•'^^ J""^ election are go- 

! going to be safe on the streets. '"? smoothly. 

know conditions prevail that before registration closed last 

/en't alwavs been this way." '"°"th, forty temporary registra- 

Jut he said he has issued an ap- "°" stations set up in banks. 

a th.ough newspapers here for st"'''^^' ^"d markets throughout the 

re persons to volunteer for the "'>' obtained between 30.000 and 

ction night jobs. *0'000 applications from voters. 

'The pay isn't very much, " Rog- The last census showed that San 

said. "We have to rely on a Francisco had a population of 740,- 

■son's desire to make a contribu- 000 persons, but about 200,000 are 

ti to the community." Top pay >mder 21 years of age. 

U8 for an in.spector who might "That leaves 540,000 in the right 

re to put in a 16-hour day. age group to vote, but not all of 

logers .said, however, that the them are neces.sarily eligible. " Rog- 

rk is a vital part of the elec- ers said, because of residence and 

n process in San Francisco. And other requirements, 

said he hoped there would be a "I would say no more than 450,- 

Jd of applications for the jobs. 000 are eligible to vote, and about 



360.000 are regcstered for the pri- 
mary election. The vote is never 
high in a primary and I don't think 
it will go over 215,000." 

Things should pick up, however, 
for the November general election, 
lu- said. Rogers estimated that 
tlu'ie will then be some 390,000 
prisons registered. "And then I 
think about 80 per cent will vote." 

In a primary, he said, "you're 



not voting for election. You're vot- 
ing for party nomination." Such 
contests, he added, usually do not 
excite the interest of the office it- 
self being at stake. 

Present registration shows that 
the Democrats outnumber the Re- 
publicans 229.000 to 127,000— but 
Rogers said this numerical ad- 
vantage usually is offset somewhat 
(Continued on Page 10) 



CADILLAC 

MOTOR CAR DIVISION 



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STONESTOWN 
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RIL - MAY, 1962 



Mayor George Christopher 



A Short Biography 



George Christopher's personal 
history and long career in public 
service are dramatic proof that 
America is still the promised land 
of the melting pot and opportunity. 
where all citizens are free to seek 
and achieve outstanding accom- 
plishments on their own initiative 
and ability, without regard to race, 
creed or color. 

The son of a Greek immigrant, 
George Christopher left day school 
at the age of fourteen because of 
his father's lingering illness, but 
continued his schooling at night. 
Four years later he graduated 
from high school and enrolled in 
college, where he studied for five 
years, graduating with a degree in 
accounting. This totalled nine 
years of continuous night class at- 
tendance. 

After practicing as a Public Ac- 
countant for several years, he 
founded a small milk company. To- 
day the highly successful Christo- 
pher Dairy Farm is the largest in- 
dependently owned dairy in the 
San Francisco Bay Area. A con- 
scientious fighter for the rights of 
small business, farmers and con- 
sumers against monopoly, George 
Christopher has long vigorously 
opposed price-fixing laws and 
agreements. 

The memory of Christopher's 
youth has never been left entirely 
behind as indicated by his constant 
efforts and financial support in be- 
half of athletic groups and other 
character-building youth activities. 
Today, more than 30,000 California 
children each year attend baseball 
and football games through his 
generosity. 

In 1945, following his meteoric 




MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 

success in the business world, 
George Christopher entered public 
service through election to the San 
Francisco Board of Supervisors. 
San Franciscans rewarded his abil- 
ity, his courage and his energy "to 
get things done" by re-electing 
him to the Board by overwhelming 
majorities. He twice served as 
President of the Board in recog- 
nition of the highest vote ever ac- 
corded any member of that Board. 

In 1955, the people of San Fran- 
cisco elected him Mayor by the 
largest majority ever given a can- 
didate for that office. 

In 1959 the confidence of the 
people was again evidenced by 
George Christopher's re-election 
tor an additional four-year term 
in the office of Mayor. 

San F r a n c is c o, under Mayor 
Christopher's guidance, was desig- 
nated b,v Fortune Magazine as 
"one of the best administered cities 



in the United States." The New 
York Times termed him a "Master 
Salesman" for the major part he 
played in the successful efforts to 
bring Big League baseball to Cali- 
fornia. Former President Hoover- - 
a Republican whose outstanding 
talents were enlisted by the Demo- 
cratic Truman Administration to 
reorganize and streamline the ad- 
ministrative offices of the Federal 
Government - has praised George 
Christopher as " the best Mayor of 
any large city with which I am ac- 
quainted." 

Since George Christopher as- 
sumed the role of chief executive 
of San Francisco, the city has 
shown a continually declining 
Clime rate. He has won national 
attention for his vigorous efforts to 
bring complete integrity to the Po- 
lice Department. 

In recognition of George Christo- 
phers outstanding administrative 
ability, he was elected president of 
the American Municipal Associ- 
ation in 1957 —a unique distinction 
rarely bestowed upon a first-term 
official.' The organization consists 
of several thousand mayors and of- 



ficials from more than 13,000 cor 
munities throughout the Uniti 
States. 

In his offical capacity, Geori 
Christopher, with his charmir 
wife Tula, has entertained with u 
f.ailing graciousness and hospital!' 
kings, queens, premiers and pies 
dents from all over the world. Fc 
lowing the 1959 visit of Niki 
Krushchev to California reques 
ed by the President and the Sta 
Department Christopher receivi 
a formal invitation to visit tl 
Soviet Union. He accepted the in\ 
tat'on and in February of 196 
paid a courtesy call on the Russii 
Premier in the Kremlin and e 
tensively toured the vast lands b 
hind the Iron Curtain. 

This historic Kremlin visit ai 
tour of the country impress 
Mayor Christopher with Americs 
need to more fully awaken to tl 
serious impact being made on tl 
economy of the Western World 1 
the Soviet brand of industrial coi 
petition. 

As a d.ynamic public official ai 
(Continued on Page 131 




Tula C'hristopher 



4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 



CARROLL BROTHERS 



MONUMENTS and INSCRIPTIONS 



1750 Mission Road 



PL. 5-2818 



Between Holy Cross and Cypress Lawn Cemeteries 
COLMA, CALIFORNIA 

Temescal Rug & Upholstery Cleaning Co. 

Expert Cleaning in your Home or at our Plant 
Complete service, laying, mothproofing. Repairs of all kinds 

Free Estimates — Neiv and Used Rug Sales 

4701 SHATTUCK AVENUE 

OLympic 8-2'575 Oakland, California 



Enroll Now 

HILLTOP BEAUTY SCHOOL 

Hollywood Trained Instructors 

6317 Mission Street — Daly City PL 6-9877 

CLOSED MONDAYS 

SHREVE & COMPANY 

J etveler s 

200 POST ST., at GRANT AVE. 
GA 1-2600 San Francisco 



Around and About 



n> WHIT HENRY 



I TTTH THE winter months be- 
A' hinil us the open road beck- 
i to those who like to drive 
iiin<i the countryside over the 
ekcnds or in the long afternoons, 
B freeways hold no allure for 
, but I love to take the back 
,ds that are remote from the 
itle and bustle of every day life. 
)rive up along the Sacramento 
'er today and you'll find very 
le in the placidly winding' 
ters to remind you of the boiler 
iting. man killing steamship 
es they had there just a little 
!r a 100 years ago. Yet they did 
re those races and Captain Enos 
iirat was usually the hero of 
m. 

Captain Fourat, came out from 
5ton in January of 1850 with 

big dream in mind of making 
lig strike in the gold fields. For- 
le. however, had other plans in 
id for him. No sooner had he ar- 
ed in San Francisco than he was 
)roached by an agent from a 
imship company who offered 
1 $1,600 to take the first pas- 
ger vessel up the Sacramento 
■er. Since Fourat wanted to go 
the gold fields and didn't have 

fare himself, he took the job. 
'hree days later he arrived in 
:ramento. collected his $1,600, 




and started getting his mining 
equipment together to go to the 
gold fields. But again that agent 
appeared, argued with Fourat for 
several hours, and finally offered 
him $2,000 to lake the ship back 
to San Francisco. Captain Fourat 
accepted the offer. 

A day and a half later he arrived 
in San Francisco, collected his $2,- 
000, and took on command of a new 
vessel, "The New 'World." 

About this time he decided that 
this r u g g e d 1 y competitive and 
highly lucrative steamship business 
might be for him, that he'd stick 
aroimd and have some fun. 

And it was some fun. On one 
trip up the Sacramento, the skip- 
per of "The Washoe." a rival 
steamship, decided to block Four- 
at's passage by turning "The Wa- 
shoe" broadside across the river, 
Fourat never hesitated. He charged 
the iron-capped prow of "The New 
World" into the soft side of "The 
Wa.shoe." In the splintering, 
(Continued on Page 12) 



J. Edwin Mattox Is New M.E.E.A. President 

JKUWIN MATTOX. executive secretary of the San Francisco Board 
, of Permit Appeals, is the new president of the Municipal Executive 
F.mployees Association. 

He succeeds Joseph Mignola, executive assistant to the chief ad- 
niinistative officer, as head of the organization of non-elective city 
executives. 

Other new officers are James J. 
Finn, administrative secertay of 
Public Utilities Commission, vice- 
president, and Emmery Mihaly. As- 
sistant County Clerk, treasurer. 

Serving for a second year as 
M.E.E.A. secretary is Virgil L. 
Elliott, Director of Finance and 
Records. 

Otheis serving on the executive 
board are Wilbur Leeds, Assistant 
Director of Public Welfare; H. 
Chris Medbery, Water Department 
Senior Engineer, and S. Myron Ta- 
tarian. Assistant Director of Public 
Works. 

An installation of officers dinner 
ceremony was held at M. H. de 
Young Memorial Museum on April 

The installing officer was the ^ J \,™^^V^^.^^W^ . 

Honorable Peter Tamaras presi- *>• F- Board of Permit Appeals 

dent of San Francisco Board of The M.E.E.A. was organized in 

Supervisors and a foi-mer president 1944 by a 14-member group which 

of the Board of Permit Appeals, included Superior Judge Herman 

Mattox, moved up to become the A. van der Zee, Controller Harry 

nineteenth M.E.E.A. president and Ross, former Registrar of Voters 

prior to assuming his Board of Thomas A. Toomey and War Me- 

Permit Appeals position in 19.50, he morial Manager Ed Sharkey, 

was a licensed public accountant Judge van der Zee was first 

with offices in the Hearst Building, president of the group, which over 

Mattox was formerly Deputy the years has endeavored to foster 

Collector of Internal Revenue in and promote higher standards of 

San Francisco. professional ethics and efficiency. 








GOOD LUCK 

and 

CONTINUED SUCCESS 


for personalized service 
residential & income properties 

marion beers, broker or 3-4245 

2150 hyde street san francisco 9 






to 
GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 

STUART N. GREENBERG 


JAMES L. VIZZARD 

Establisbeil 1890 
ALEX SOURIKOFF. Associate 

Insurance Brokers 

2840 JUDAH STREET 

San Francisco 22, California 

Phone LOmbard 6-7741 

Strength - Permanency ■ Good Reputation 



RIL - MAY, 1962 



THE HONGKONG 
AND SHANGHAI 

BANKING 
CORPORATION 
OF CALIFORNIA 

A Subsidiory of The Hongkong Bonic 

Group which hos more than 140 

offices throughout the world . . . 

Total ossets: $1,250,000,000 




80 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 

Member Federal Deposit Insur 
Corporation 



P.G.&E. Will Complete 
Humboldt Bay Power Plant 



states Atomic Energy Commissi 
admitted private industry into t 
study of atomic energy. PG^ 
joined the Nuclear Power Groi 
an organization of eight compan 
formed to do the reasearch and ( 
velopment work necesary for t 
constiniction of a large aton 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 1962 Fords 

Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 



MOVING ANOTHER STEP FORWARD in its program of generat- 
ing electricity from atomic fuels, Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany will complete its new 60,000 kilowatt nuclear reactor power plant power plant. Member companies 
at Humboldt Bay late this summer, according to S. L. Sibley, PG&E the group built Dresden NucU 
Vice President and General Manager. Power Station near Chicago 

Begun two years ago and financed entirely by PG&E, the .$20 mil- partnership with the Commc 
lion plant is expected to provide 
competitively-priced power at Eu- 
reka at the time of loading the 
second core, or in 1965. It is ex- 
pected that energy generated from 
atomic fuel at Humboldt Bay will 
have an approximate cost of 8 
mills per kilwatt-hour, comparable 
with the cost in that area of gen- 
eration from conventional fuels. 

The Humboldt Bay Power Plant 
design incorporates an entirely new 
idea for reactor containment which 
eliminates the costly large sphere 
or capsule used in the design of 
early atomic reactors. By this new 
design, which is called "pressure 
suppression." the reactor is in- 
stalled entirely underground in a 
reinforced concrete well which is 
surrounded by a pressure suppres- 
sion pit partly filled with water. 
Any steam which might escape 
from the reactor would be piped 
into this subterranean water. This 
design is less expensive to build 
and constitutes a marked advance 
in containment design, Sibley said. 

It is expected that the reactor 
core will be loaded for the first 
time in August, and the unit will 

be placed on the line later in t')ie a general view of the interior of the reactor 
year after tests have been com- 

boldt Bay Power Plant under construction, showing the dry 




P.G.acE. HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT 



pleted. 

PG&E has been interested in ground. The tank in the background is th, 

electric generation from nuclear . , ^ , , .,,.... 

„ ,„_, . ». T, .. . right of the condenser IS the fuel pit loader, 

fission smce 1951, when the United ^ 



at the new P.G.a:E. Hu 
ell in the fo 
emergency condenser. To t 



E. MARTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Established 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 

EXbrook 7-2760 



AMBASSADOR 

1168 -36th Street - Oakland 8 
Telephone OLympic 3-7422 

LAUNDRY COMPANY 

Established 1925 




P.G.StE. HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT 

oking south at the P.G.flcE. Humboldt Bay Power Plant, showing the new 
clear reactor plant in the foreground and the existing conventional plant in 
r background. To the left foreground is the generator deck and gantry crane 
lie to the right is the reactor building and stack. 



wealth Edison Company, the own- 
ing and operating company, Dre.s- 
den is a 180,000 kilowatt boiling 
water reactor, completed in 1960 
at a cost of $50 million. 

In 19.').'> General Electric Com- 
pany announced plans to build Val- 
lecitos Atomic Laboratory near 
Pleasanton, and PG&E joined with 
G. E., to build Vallecitos Atomic 
Power Plant there. This ."i.OOO kilo- 
watt boiling water reactor station 
is the world's first ail-privately 
financed nuclear power plant. It 
has been generating electricity for 
commercial distribution since Oc- 
tober 1957. 

Now, subject to necessary fed- 
eral and state approvals, PG&E 
proposes to build a 325,000 kilo- 
watt atomic power generating sta- 
tion at Bodega Bay Aatomic Park, 
on Bodega Bay, appro.ximately 50 
miles north of San Francisco. This 
plant will cost $61 million and will 
produce electricity for less than 6 
mills per kilowatt-hour. Its gene- 
rating capacity will be large 
enough to serve a city of half a 
million people, 

PG&E has committed $100 mil- 
lion to atomic power development 
during ten years of diligent effort 
and research, and its atomic pro- 
gram has been achieved with its 
own funds. With the completion 
of Humboldt Bay this year and Bo- 
dega Bay late in 1965, PG&K will 
have demonstrated the practic- 
ability of the task it undertook in 
1951; to establish the atom as a 
reliable, low-cost source of energy, 
helping to serve all of central and 
northern California, 



EAGLESOX 
EXGIB^EERS 



615 Saiisome Street 



San Franciso 11, California 



Victoria Pastry Co., Inc. 

Italian and French Pastries 
and Confections 

Cakes for All Occasions 

1362 STOCKTON STREET 
SU 1-2015 



TRICOLOR FRENCH RESTAURANT 

Dinner after 4 P.M. 

Closed Monday 

4233 GEARY BLVD. BA. 1-8707 



HAYES VALLEY AQU.'.RIUM 

CumpUlc Lnu- <.f Tro^Klll /'.si, 
and Eqml^mc.n 

327A Hayes Street UN. 3-3483 



MAR VISTA PHARMACY 

"Lei Us Help Supoty Your 

Family Needs" 

DAVID ZISKO, Prop. 

3035 Taraval St. OV. 1-1330 



BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

Specialists on Wheel Aligtiment 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-7020 

Bill Barca San Francisco 



Reverend 


JOSEPH POUGH 


c.^^^ 


1739 Fillmore Street 


San Francisco, California 



RIL - M.\'\'. m62 



CHARLES A. ROGERS 

(Continued from Page fil 
because Republicans normally turn 
out in greater numbers on election 
day. 

His department's biggest job 
comes in processing a mountain 
of registrations and other data. 
Rogers said. The work load is be- 
coming so great, he said, that 
"some eventually will have to be 
handled by automation-electronic 
data processing." 

Difficulties are bound to arise, 
he said, when the flood of voters 
turns out June 5th to record their 
choices on the city's 1465 voting 
machines. 

"When you're dealing with 300,- 
000 per.sons who are voting, you 
can have almost any type of prob- 
lem . . . including personality 
clashes between the voter and the 
precinct worker and among the 
precinct workers themselves. 

But that old bugaboo — a voter 
trying to vote more than once — 
is no problem here. "I don't know 
of any time when a person has at- 
tempted to vote twice. There has 
not been any election irregularity 
that I know of. Anything that 
might appear to be an error is 
usually only a matter of a mis- 
understanding." 

The voting machines, Rogers 
said, seldom if ever break down. 
"Its mechanically very simple." 
The department usually has things 
running so smoothly that it is able 
to have complete, unofTicial returns 
within four hours after the polls 
are closed. Last year, during the 
municipal elections, the job only 
took 3 hours and 15 minutes. 

Aside from legistering votei-s, 
taking sworn statements of eligi- 



bility, and then making multiple 
lists of those eligible, the depart- 
ment also mails sample ballots and 
the full texts of propositions to the 
voters. 

All of this, Rogers said, "makes 
the job a little rough. And due to 
various complications, they still 
haven't filled my old job, so I have 
not been able to let go of many of 
the duties I've been doing the past 

10 years." 

Rogers assumed his present post 
in November of 1960 after topping 

11 other applicants in a competi- 
tive examination. For the 10 years 
before that, he was chief clerk of 
elections. 

Rogers became a city employee 
in 1940. His first post was as a 
clerk in the Public Works Depart- 
ment, and he later moved on to the 
Purshasing Department. 

His department's budget aver- 
ages $550,000 a year. Since one 
election is held one year and two 
the next, the average cost per 
election averages out to about 
$350,000, Rogers said. But that 
figure, he added, includes costs for 
the entire month-in, month-out 
operation of the department. 

To give a better idea of what 
the costs for an election itself 
might amount to, Rogers discussed 
the possibility of a special election 
here next year on proposals for 
San Francisco to participate in a 
Rapid Transit District. 

If the district fails to get the 
measure on the November ballot, 
a special election next year would 
cost about $160,000, he said. But, 
he added, the money would not 
come from the city treasury. The 
transit district would have to pay 
the costs itself. 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



Kml^ 


Claude Bcrhouet and Claudinc Berhouet, Props. 

Hotel de France 

BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 

780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 

1600 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco 9, California 

PRospect 6-0880 



VOLKSWAGEN 

— Distributors — 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - NORTHERN NEVADA - UTAH 



PETRINI PIAZA 








FALLErn 








and 








BALDOCCHI 








FI^ER FOODS 






photic 


Jordan 7-0l)7() fiilloii 


and 


masonic 



CALIFORNIA WATER & TELEPHONE CO. 

300 Montgomery St. 
GArfieW 1-4826 San Francisco 



THE RECOR 




Edw.ird Gaflney will act in 
Sacramento 

ASSEMBLYMAN 

Edward M. Gaffney 

18th DISTRICT 



IT PAYS TO BE 
CIVIC MINDED 



41% 



Save by 10th— earn from 1st 
CuTTtfit annual rate 

CIVIC 
FEDERAL 
SAVINGS 

and Loan Association 

515 POLK STREET 

1 block north of City Hall 

ORdway 3-2065 

INSURED SAFETY 



STAGI'S 
LIQUOR STORE 

3055 • I6lh Street 
UN 3-3123 

17th & BALBOA 
GROCERY 

Groceries-Produce 

Beer-Wine 

1601 BALBOA STREET - SK 1-33 

CHOCHO 

Japanese Restaurant 

1020 KEARNY STREET 

EX 7-3066 



POLICE RESERVE 
NEEDS VOLUNTEERS 




(^HIEF THOMAS CAHILL 
San Francisco Police Dept. 

Police Chief Thomas Cahill an- 
nounced the launching of a re- 
cruitment campaign for volunteers 
to join the San Francisco Police 
Reserve. 

"Recent graduationn of Reserve 
policemen has created a number of 
vacancies in the current basic 
training course offered volunteers 
that must be filled immediately," 
Cahill said. 

The chief declared there is an 
urgent need of 42 volunteers to in- 
crea.sc the Reserve membership to 
its full complement. The indoctrin- 
ation program calls for classroom 
attendance two nights weekly dur- 
ing a four-month period. 

Physically fit adult male citizens 
of good moral character and intel- 
ligence are eligible to submit ap- 
plications at the city's Police De- 
partment Division of Training, Hall 
of Ju.stice. 880 Bryant St. at 7 p.m. 
on Mondays and Fridays. Infor- 
mation may be obtained by call- 
ing KLondike 3-1343. 

The Police Reserve is a unit of 
the San Francisco Disaster Coun- 
cil and Corps. 



PARK HOTEL 

Clean, Reasonable Rates 

1040 FOLSOM ST. 

UN. 1-9397 



VAN ECKHARDT 
Photographs 

760 MARKET STREET 
San Frandsco EX. 2-6635 



93 Jefferson St., So. San Francisco 

Tony's Body & Fender Repairs 

Expert Au+o Pdintinq - Free Estimates 
All Worh Guordnteed 

?43 O'EARRELL ST — SAN ERANCISCO 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 

751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CAUF. 

Sweetheart Hams and Bacon 

''Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 

NAVAJO FREIGHT LINES, Inc. 

8S5 Ferry St. AT. 2-95X0 

Oakland, California 

KITCHEN REMODELING 



Cabinets 6/ Built-in Appliances — Store Fronts 6f Fixtures 

PETER D. SCATENA, INC. 
1265 SHAFTER AVENUE — MI 8-8830 

North Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 

PETERSON SUPPLY CO. 

NEON SIGN SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 

480 Fifth Street DOuglas 2-1695 

San Francisco 7, California 

OTAGIRI MERCANTILE CO., Inc. 

70 Pine Street — SA 1-8846 

San Francisco, California 



B,iskelball, BanetMll, Fo.ilbalI, Softball, G»ll, Track, Tcnnia, BowMn 
Unitomu, Trophies &: Medals, Ski Rentals, Hunlin)!, Fishing 

FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 



1404 TARAVAL STREI T 



S.in Fr..m:i5<o 16, C.lil. 



MOnlrosc 1.100<) 



GEORGE SCHARETG & SONS - Draymen 

SAN FRANCISCO 7 MI. 7-4932 

Office: 904 - 22nd STREET 



UL ■ MAY. 1962 



WHIT HENRY 

I Continued from Page 7 I 
criinohing crash that followed, one 
man was killed and at least a 
dozen were injured. 

After this little incident. Captain 
Fourat was undisputed master of 
the Sacramento. Only the skipper 
of "The Sea Castle" dared chal- 
lenge him to a race, and in doing 
it he piled so many pitch-soaked 
logs into his furnaces that his boil- 
ers exploded with a thunderous 
roar and killed 65 men aboard. 

During his career as a steamship 
pilot. Captain Fourat made several 
attempts to reach the gold fields 
but never quite got there. 

When he died they went through 
his belongings. Under the bunk on 
which he died they found his care- 
f\illy cleaned and polished mining- 
pan, mining pick, and mining 
shovel. Captain Enos Fourat had 
hoped to realize his big dream with 
these implements and he died with 
them close at hand, 

San Juan Bautista is Fine 
Historical Monument 

In few places in California can 
you step back into past centuries 
so completely and so pleasantly as 
at San Juan Bautista. 

Located on State Route 156 just 
a few miles east of U. S. 101. about 
40 miles south of San Jose, this 
sleepy little town has a plaza that 
is surrounded by buildings from 
the Spanish, Mexican, and Early 
American periods of California his- 
tory. Each of these buildings, is in 
a fine state of repair and things in- 
side are fairly much as they were 
many long decades ago. 

Founded in 1797, Mission San 
Juan Bautista has a fascinating 
museum filled with objects from 
the early days and a church that 



is still used regularly as a place 
of worship. 

Castro House, beautifully repre- 
sentative of the Mexican Period, is 
open to guided tours and inside its 
thick adobe walls you will walk 
through living rooms and bedrooms 
furnished and decorated just as 
they were over a hundred years 
ago. 

Zanetta House, the Plaza Hotel, 
and the Old Livery Stable are all 
buildings representative of the 
Early American Period. 

Tlie Zanetta House has its 
stately living room, its sunlit bed- 
rooms with French windows open- 
ing on the grassy plaza or flower 
filled garden. 

The Plaza Hotel has its bed- 
rooms, an attractive dining room, 
and a bar and gambling room all 
lestored to what they were in the 
long ago when passengers from 
stagecoach lines and folk from 
local I'anches used to gather here 
to wine, dine, drink, gamble, and 
pass the night. 

At the Old Livery Stable you 
will find some excellent examples 
of early coaches and carriages and 
among the carriages you will spot 
an elegant barouche originally 
owned by William Ralston, early 
San Francisco financier and builder 
of the Palace Hotel. 

The mission itself is supported 
and operated by the Catholic 
Church. The other buildings are 
all part of the San Juan Bautista 
State Historical Monument. 

For the factual information in 
this month's column I am indebted 
to the research staff of the Na- 
tional Automobile Club whose 
manager is an old friend of mine 
— Bert Stewart. Thank you Bert, 
and send me more material any 
time. 



GREYHOUND 



E. A. ROCHETTE 

Agent — Western Greyhound Lines 
214 Airport Blvd., South San Francisco. JUno 8-1126 



GENE'S UNION SERVICE STATION 

Complete ONE-STOP SERVICE 
490 BAY STREET OR 3-7913 



ERNEST EOTTl 

Business Representative 

Chauffeurs' Union, Local No. 265 
2450 - 17th Street, San Fran cisco, HEmlock 1-4267 

PHONE OYympic 2-8210 DAY OR NIGHT 

RED TOP ELECTRIC CO. 

Emeryville. Inc. 
ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION & MAINTENANCE 

4377 ADELINE STREET 
EMERYVILLE 8, CALIFORNIA 



HEARST CORPORATION 

HEARST BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

THE lOWRlE PAVING CO., INC. 

J. F. Lowrie, President — James W. Lowrie, Vice-President 

San Francisco Yard, 2170 Oakdalc Ave, San Francisco 24, Calif. 
R. J. Kilroy, Superintendent 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Grading — Paving — Underground Construction 

Main Office and Yard Lowrie Avenue, South San Francisco, Calif, 
(415) PO 1-2265 (415) JU 3-3574 

CONNOLLY'S LIQUORS 

3149 MIDDLEFIELD ROAD 
REDWOOD CITY 
EMERSON 8-8721 

AlITO SEAT COVERS 

All types of custom work 

HE 1-5369 

AUTO — TRUCK — BOATS 

Seat Covers— Door Panels— Arm Rests— Jump Seats— Bed Covers— Rugs 

Home— Chrome Chairs— Small Occasional Chairs — Bar Stools 

and Miscellaneous Items 

Open Mondays and Wednesdays until 9 P.M. 

4057 - 18th STREET 

AIRPORT ORAYAGE COMPANY 

PHONE JUno 9-1880 

San Francisco 28, California 

San Francisco International Airport 

The San Francisco Heart Association 



259 GEARY BOULEVARD - 


- YU 2-5753 


uses gifts and bequests to support rcsea 
community service in fighting the nation' 


ch, education and 
t No. 1 disease 


259 GEARY BOULEVARD - 


- YU 2-575 5 



THE RECOi 



Mayor (Ihrisloplit'r 

(Contimiod from Pa;;!' ij i 
hly successful self-made husi- 
isman. Mayor George Chrislo- 
sr has lonsistently been a viffoi- 
1 exponent of the free enterprise 
item, and throughout his career 
I steadfastly opposed excessive 
^ernmental controls. 
ie has had widespread rank and 

labor union support in his cam- 
gns for public office, and in his 
iiness life he has played a lead- 
• part in stabilizinR labor nego- 
Lions affecting the milk indus- 
. In the 22 years of its existence. 

own plant has never experi- 
;ed one hour of work stoppage. 
V skilled negotiator. Mayor 
ristopher has successfuU.v avert- 
several threatened breakdowns 
labor-management disputes of 
lous import to San Francisco. 
luding street car and civic opera 
ikes. 

ie has acquired intimate knowl- 
[e of State Government through 
close working relationship with 
islators and Stale officials on 
nmon problems. He is a firm 
impion of urban-rural and inter- 
ional cooperation. In great de- 
nd in recent years for speaking 
[agements throughout Califor- 
, George Christopher has a wide 
(Uaintance and growing follow- 
■ in every section of the State, 
recognition of his emergence as 
! of the trul.v outstanding men 
public service on the California 
itical scene. 



RIVIRA DINNER HOUSE 

2325 T.iraval Street 

RIVIERA RESTAURANT 

Itali.m Dinners — Cocktails 
445 Clement St. 

ESSIE EVANS 

Seamstress 

616 Broderick St.— FI. 6-9945 

Sierra's Auto Service 

J15 EDDY ST. 
GR. 4-6234 

PERSONALITY HATS 

3210 - 21st Street 
San Francisco, California 

PAUL MORSE 

UNION "76" STATION 

Ocean St Hcrold Avenues 

Stella's Pastries 

r«*e5 & Pastries for All Occasions 
46 Columbus YU. 6-2914 



SQUARE DEAL PAINT STORE 

KEHDAR RASMUS.SEN. O-iur 
3800 - 17th St. HE. 1-4054 



Wing Sun Funeral Parlor 

17 BRENHA1V1 PLACE 
Phone YU. 2-0719 



PALM WINE & LIQUOR STORE 

Liquor. Hint; Beer, Mixes. Ice 
698 Haight St. MA. 1-0135 



COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

Matt Spoiler, Mgr. - Owner 
1846 Union St. FI. 6-7793 



JACK'S RESTAURANT 

Lunch and Dinner 
615 SACRAMENTO GA 1-9854 

Open 11:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. weekdays 
4 p.m. ■ 9:30 p.m. Sundays 



A&B GARMENT DELIVERY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

TOM MAXWEtL 
2277 SHAFTER AVENUE-MI 8-7111 



ROBERT ALCHIAN 

JEWLER-WATCHMAKER 

Diamonds— Antiques— Gifts 

1123 TARAVAl STREET-OV 1-6389 



THE BLANKET CO. 

Electric Blankets 

Seryice & Repairs 

Rebinding & Laundry Service 

2508 NORIEGA ST.-IO 4-8645 



FAR EAST CAFE 

•Chinese Food at Its' BEST" 
631 GRANT AVENUE 



SCOTT'S HARDWARE 

Fuller Paints 
Homext ares-Builder's Hardware 

ED HERMANY 

2501 IRVING STREET-SE 1-1149 



ROMA FOUNTAIN 

Breakfast-Lunch-Short Orders 

GIOVANNI CASTORINA 

653 UNION ST. near COLUMBUS 



BARKY, orNIJLL i^ DlKKCkS 

Insurance BroUers 

256 MONTGOMERY ST. DO 2-2663 

San Francisco, California 

LOU JENNY 

MORTICIAN SUPPLIES - SALES AGENCY 

1520 - 22nd AVENUE SE 1-5166 

San Francisco 22, California 

EL FARO GROCERY 

THE BEST IN DOMESTIC and MEXICAN FOOD and GROCERIES 
2399 Folsom Street San Francisco, California 

MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

All Types Brooni Fibres Sc Wire — For Street Sweepers, Street Push 

Broms — Street Flushers dC Sewer Cleaning Equipment 

GEORGE L. AVERY 

4516 MOLLIS ST.-OAKLAND 8. CALIFORNIA-OLympic 4-5254 



REGINALD R. SUTTER 



MA. 1-5447 



Suiter Furniture Mfg. Co. 



CUSTOM FURNITURE ■ 
275 CAPP STREET 



WHOLESALE ONLY 

SAN FRANCISCO 10 



EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Newest Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational View 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-2928 

Reasonable Rates - Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 



Day Phone EX. 7-6185 



Night Phone ML 7-8770 



ED ART 

PREDOVICH AUTO REPAIRS 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING - BODY AND FENDER WORK 
166 FREMONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Advertising • Office Forms ■ Commercial Printing • Brochures • Bulletins 
WARREN O. TIPTON 

warren's waller press — fine printing and lithographing since 193/ 
227 CHURCH ST., San Francisco 14 Phones: UN 1-0437 ■ UN 1-4718 

NELSON'S CATERING SERVICE 

"BE A GUEST AT YOUR OWN PARTY" 

We Invite You to Try Our Service Specializing in Weddings 

Teas— Banquets— Smorgasbord— Dishes— Silver— Etc. 

2542 MacARTHUR BLVD - OAKLAND. CALIF. KEIIog 2-1086 



RIL - MAY. 1962 



BAY WINDOW 

1 Continued f i oni Page ;i I 
cess story. 

BEING ADMITTEDLY MAD 
meaning both "crazy" and "angry 



While at it, we might as well 
Idcik down to that other San Fran- 
cisco suburb, Carniel, where totally 
blind Attorney Kben Whittlesey is 
the new Mayor. 

And why, you ask, docs the Bay 




„ .... „ , . „„i„„Ki„ o„„,;.„ Window have such a great big and 

— politics could conceivably spawn , » , ■ , ,-. 

sweeping point of view? Because 

San Francisco isn't just a City lo- 
cated on a tiny base of only 4,') 
square miles; it's a state-of-minil 
City spreading grandly out in all 
land directions, causing instant 
affinity to o c c u r wherever it 
touches. Even Oakland, afflicted 
as it is with badly ingrown provin- 
cialism, is part of our state-of- 
mind; its Mayor John Houlihan 
was a Mission District San Fran- 
can. 

MISS SAN FRANCISCO is an- 
other, and fetching, example of the 
vast regional concept of our City: 
La.st year's Miss was Lans Green 
of Daly City; this year our new 
Miss is Sally Hamberlin of El 
Cerrito! 

Till-tilting has developed into a 
quite active, fascinaitng but disas- 
trous pasttime deep down the Pen- 
insula. The Fre Chief of Mountain 
View was charged with grand theft 
after discovery of an $800 short- 
ages in bicycle license fees collect- 
ed by the Fire Department. 

This was peanuts, however, in 
comparison to the elephantine 
activities of the City Treasurer of 
San Jose who confessed that he 
had stolen about $80,000 in park- 
ing meter funds over the past 10 
years. When caught he turned out 
to be voluble indeed, to wit: "I did 
it to give my son and daughters 
all the advantages and education I 
never had ... I got bolder as the 
years went by and nothing hap- 
pened I guess I just went 

overboard." 

But the City Tieasurer's mas- 
tery of outraged rationalization 
was the story element that by far 
out-shadowed the confessed em- 
bezzlements. He blamed the system 
that made theft easy, particularly 
his boss: "As long as I live I'll 
blame him. He's at fault in letting 
this situation exist. He never gave 
any of his department heads any 
supervision at all." 

Ah, the sights one sees and the 
sounds one hears from the Bay 
Window! 



GOODWIN KNIGHT 

this situation: The primaries pro- 
duce a strong Shell show, a bat- 
tered Nixon winning; Goody Knight 
steps in as an Independent conten- 
der, gathers GOP support in a move 
to unseat Governor Pat Brown. 
Couldn't happen! Could happen? 

Here in San Francisco there's 
one household out in the Ashbury 
Heights district where a pleasantly 
addled situation exists. The house- 
hold is that of Charlie Teevin, long- 
time Democrat party-liner who's a 
perennial in such campaigns as 
Shelley, Reilly, etc., and who has 
organized the St. Patrick's par- 
ade since Time Immemorial. His 
charming wife. Ann, a 57-year-old 
grandmother, is campaigning for 
the Republican nomination in the 
new 18th Assembly District. 

THE BAY WINDOW provides a 
fine vantage place through which 
to view some mighty interesting 
events of recent occurance in the 
Bay Area generally. Like over in 
Sausalito where Sally Stanford's 
gigantically-publicized move to join 
the City Council was defeated by 
the unamused voters. And in Mill- 
brae where a grandmother, Mrs. 
Josephine Waugh, was elected that 
community's first lady Mayor. And 
in the South Bay's little Union City 
where Tom Kitayama, a Nisei nur- 
seryman, polled the highest vote 
for City Council and was elected 
Mayor. 



THE IDEAL HOTEL 

Clean • Comfortable 
Economical 

n?4 STOCKTON ST. 
SU. 1-9615 



MARK'S 

FLYING "A" SERVICE 

Dumar Fajgardin 

Always Efficient Service 

Van Ness &. Bay St., TU 5-1116 



Universal Cafe 

Chinese Food at its Best 
826 Washington St., YU 2-3493 



HOTEL GOLDEN GATE 



Cle 
549 Kea 



nnable Rates 

DO. 2-0573 



SCULLY dklk; CO. 



SUtter 1-3090 
1770 Fulton Street 



156 GEARY STREET 

San Francisco 8, California 
948 Market Street - 2598 Mission Street 



Owl Rexall Drugs 



Franchisee! Dealer 



Berkeley Hills Chapel 

One of California's Finest 

1600 SHATTUCK AVE., at Cedar Street 
THornwall 1-2300 Berkeley 9, California 

In Walnut Creek - PLEASANT HILL AREA - see 

OAK PARK HILLS CHAPEL 

MAGLEBY, PAGE .md ODER 
3111 NORTH MAIN WALNUT CREEK 

"THE TERMITE MAN" "THE EXTERMINATOR" 



State Licensed 
INSPECTION - REPORTS 
ESTIMATES - REPAIRS 



SPECIALISTS IN 

EFFECTIVE TREATMENT 

OF 

Rats - Mice - Insects 

7 DAYS A WEEK — 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. 



Termites - Dry Rot 
Beetles 



UN 1-2328 

The HALPERIN COMPANY 

4042 - 20th Street, San Francisco 

St.in Seaman 

California Tropliy and Engraving Co. 

PRospect 6-6932 

Jewelry — Diamonds — Watches 

299 Ellis Street San Francisco 2, California 

Easter Greetings to the City Employees 

BENZIGER BROS., INC. 

CHURCH GOODS - RELIGIOUS GIFTS 
RELIGIOUS BOOKS 



758 Mission Street 



SU. 1-5159 



GEARY FORD -4700 Geary Blvd.-BA. 1-2300 

AL CUNNINGHAM, President 

See the New iqbZ FORD 

.4/so-NEW 1961 FORDS. High Quality Used Cars. Lowest Prices 
Lowest Down Payments and Longest Terms 

AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION OF STREET, ELECTRIC RAILWAY 
and MOTOR COACH EMPLOYEES OF AMERICA 

LOCAL DIVISION 1225 

1151 MARKET STREET - ROOM 302 

Telephone KLondike 2-3158 San Francisco, California 



AUG 2 r-^ 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




lAY WINDOW 



GROUND & ABOUT 

WHIT HENRY 



Virgil Elliott, right, as a representative of Mayor George Christopher, presents "key 
to the city" to a San Francisco visitor. (Page 4) 



JUNE -JULY. 1962 



LETTERS TO THE 
EDITOR 



Editor: (City-County Record) 

Your recent article about the 
city acquiring Fort Funston, with 
all those underground concrete 
chambers, suggests that our city 
officials ought to "get on the ball" 
and use them for bomb-proof stor- 
age of old. but vital, records. 
Very truly yours, 
s/ Virginia Reay 
21S3 Lake Street 
San Francisco 18 

Editor's Note: Your idea is a good 
one, and we learned that City 
officials are working on it. 

Editor: (City-County Record) 

The city directory you run in 
nearly every issue is a real public 
service, and a big help to me in my 
daily work. 

Sincerely, 
Lou Aronian 
94 Denslowe Drive 
San Francisco 27 



February 13, 1962 

SAN FRANCISCO STATE 

COLLEGE 

1600 Halloway Avenue 

San Francisco 27, CaUfornia 

Editor: 

I want to express our sincere ap- 
preciation for your kindness in 
helping to complete our holdings 
of City-County Record. At this 
time we are making every effort 
to give our collections more depth 
in order to be able to support the 
growing program of graduate 
studies, and your contribution is 
very helpful. 

Thank you again for your gener- 
ous cooperation, and best wishes. 
Sincerely yours, 

Kenneth J. Brough 
College Librarian 



P.^UL WHITMARSH 

T&W Enameling Company 

Lacquer & Baked Enamel Finishes 
To Specification 

Satisfaction Gu 



anteed 
1562 BANCROFT 

East of 5700 Block - 3rd Street 
Phone MI. 8-1595 



KLondikc 2-2870 

MERCHANTS 
Credit Association 

Collections Since 1925 

STAN MORRIS, Jr. 

1026 Market St. — Suite 320 

San Francisco 2, Calif. 



Mission 8-9998 

THE 
CHEROKEE 

Sam • Tony • Terry 

453 CORTLAND AVE. 
San Francisco 



Business: PRospect 5-438S 
Home: GRaystonc 4-0717 

A-1 Refrigeration Sales I Service 

Commercial and Domestic 
1465 HYDE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

R. W. MOON, Service Engineer 
Refrigeration i Washer Rental Service 



|JJ^.1VW^^ 




BURGERMEISTER 

BREWING 

CORP. 

San Francisco, 
California 



"My new electric dishwasher frees us 
from after-dinner drudgery!" 

What a life! . . . when you can settle down right after 
dinner with the kitchen neat as a pin! No "K.P." for 
family or friends, for dishes are done automatically. 
Cleaner dishes, too, because they're washed in water 
hotter than your hands could ever touch! See the new 
dishwashers at a Reddy Recommended Dealer — portable 
(at about $200) or built-in . . .You'll agree: Why be a 
dishwasher— 6u{/ one! .— .^ ,^.^ _ 

Act/lc Gas andElccInc ComfUf 




405-E-360 REV 



Pacific Coast Builders 

No. 1 South Park 
San Francisco 



Enroll fi oiv 

HILLTOP BEAUTY SCHOOL 



Hollyivood Trained Instructors 



6317 Mi.sslon Street — Daly City 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



PL 6-9877 



AUG 2 ISo-! 

PUBLIC LlOBAfl' 



bay windto^v 




EMEJIBKK. FRIENDS, that old ohiick fuJl of fright pittiirp, "Sor- Look. Telephone Company, youi 
. ry, «r..nK Xiuiiber." which had Barbara St.iumyck co-st4irred digit dialing and your all-numeral 
h a t«-h-phon.'? As we nostalffically reeall, her solo tour de force telephone numbers are in direct 
■tche<l over a breath-taking hour and a half or so. conflict with Our Way of Life. We 

Well, what would have happened to Barbara and her suspense- don't care at all that .such places 
light perfornuuiie if digit dialing had been in effect at the time? as Cincinnati, Atlantic City and 

■ hunch is that she'd have gone Omaha have changed to the new 

ipletely to pieces, tr.ving to re- be easier to dial "4211212." This system. We want to protect and 
•nber ALL those numbers, and ^e need same as the biidges ? preserve the wondeis of San Fran- 

entire "Sorry. Wrong Number" And then the Telephone Com- '^^'^°' '•■s Golden Gate Park, its 
•y would have come apart at the pany goes on to muse that "like Fisherman's Wharf, its Chinatown, 
ms in 15 mmutes. Or less. buggies and steam locomotives and ''^ pi'etty ladies sunning at Aquatic 

magine Barbara, menaced by a ferries, the Bay Area has outgrown ^'^''^^ 'ts smart ladies hoofing up 
er, desperately digit - dialing, the old names." Like YUkon and G^nt, its street corner flower 
ting a barber shop in Peoria or Mission and HEmlock and DIa 
ir in Santa Barbara, going ber- mend. 
c trying to remember ALL 

36 numbers when all the time t„,„„v, 

. _, .,^ ,.„, telephone nimibeis and our fine 

merely wanted a nnld little u„,j„„„ ,4. „ 

. . ,, , , ^ . budges for the same reason, Tele- 

iber following a local prefix in _>,-_„ r> _ . , 

4 ,_ f ,. ,_ ,.,.., phone Company. And we take pernicious campaign to thrust 

er to get help for her plight! f,„,.„j • -i, j „ 

. ^ ^ . 4- , tiaied-up issue with your cavalier down our throats what the weak- 

i going off her cinematic rocker _.,„„„ .*,,,,, , j ... , „. 

* . .. , , reference to the lovely ferries that kneed citizens of Cincinnati, At- 

1 more precipitously as she __^ j„, „ . , , , » „ 1 , „ 

. , I. , / • . 0"e day may again plough the bay lantic City and Omaha have appai- 

jeratelv dialed wrong number ,,,„».,.„ <- o j t , ... » 

J „, wateis. ently taken without a murmur, our 

ir wrong number — and all long „ ..• .. .„ , , . . , 

ance: Ah. the soaring bill — ^°" '^'^"^' ""aybe, to make snide """^'^ w''^'*' will be awful indeed, 
to mention the imminence of ^""^''^^ about our cable cars, too. We'll use you. Telephone Com- 
■der most foul . . . Telephone Company ? pany, to send fearsome sparks 

ow comes the Telephone Com- 
y, until recently a sarcosanct 
ity, to assert that "the Bay 
a needs all-numberal — " a 
int synonym for "digit dialing" 
telephone numbers and its 
ges for the same reason." 
istead of the City-County Rec- 
3 respectable "HE 1-1212" the 
iphone Company claims it will 




from our ignited rage clear across 
the country to our Congressmen 
in Washington, D. C. Yessir, Tele- 
phone Company, we'll dial our Con- 
gre.ssmen! Let's see. now, that 
would be "7591238." Or would it 
be "6031674"? Or "8496528"? 
Whoosh — "18HE659"! Whoosh 
and double whoosh ! 

No, no, Omaha, we're not calling 
(Continued on Page 14) 



shops, its cable cars, and, yes, its 
YUkon, its Mission, its HEmlock 

We don't need your all-numeral ^""^ ''" '^^ °"'*'' <^harming pre- 
fixes we know and love so well. 

If you persist in this soul-less. 



ITY-COUNTY RECORD 

e Magazine of Good Governmeul 
San Francisco and che Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 

Editor and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 

San Francisco 14, California 

Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

JUNE-JULY. 1962 
)LUME :<; NUMBER 4 



FRANK J. MOHR 

Investment Seenrities 
Stocks - Bonds 



ik 



454 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
San Francisco 11, California 

EXbrook 7-5138 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Lven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 



Depot: 



U-Drires, 

Limousines, 

Charier Buses 

available 



44 FOURTH STREET 
■YUlcon 6-4000 



E-JULY, 1962 



VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 

DIRECTOR 
FINANCE AND RECORDS 

By Record Staff Writer 



ONE OF SAN FRANCISCO City and County government's younger 
top executives, Finance and Records Director Virgil L. Elliott, is 
a prototype of the new and emerging public official who balances hard- 
nosed practical realism with a calm scholastic attitude toward the 
problems of municipal affairs. His is the people-centered approach. 
He considers that his job requires being three things all at the same 
time — a practitioner, a teacher and 
a researcher — much the same as a 
doctor in the field of medicine. 

"As I see my job," he explains, 
"it is involved with putting into 
practice what administrative skills 
and techniques I have leained 
through education and experience, 
with training of my subordinates, 
and with study and analysis of 
work situations." 

If this seems to imply academic 
overtones, probably Elliott intends 
that it should. His career since 
graduating from college in 1940 has 
been almost equally divided be- 
tween private enterprise and gov- 
ernment, but with the educational 
processes intertwined throughout. 
Let's refer to a paper prepared 
by a Stanford University political 

science major who, last April, along contact with former Mayor Robin- 
with a group of 15 Coro Founda- son and was made his confidential 
tion Laboratory Course students, secretary. He went on to become 
interviewed Elliott at his City Hall Director of Public Service, San 
first floor headquarters. Here is a Francisco Public Utilities Commis- 
pertinent extract from that paper: sion, immediately preceding his 

"Elliott's background is both re- present position, 
vealing as to the sources of his at- "Elliott exemplifies the coming 
titude, and indicative of the type attitude of professionalism in civic 
of man patronage (rightly) places administration. He is currently 
in this kind of position. A product completing a University of Califor- 
of Missouri State Teachers College nia certificate course in public ad- 
as a social science major and his- ministration, and serving as an 
tory minor, Elliott went from the officer of the Municipal Executive 
principalship of an elementary Employees' Association — a group 
school to newspaper work. As City of top non-elective public officials 
Hall reporter for the old San Fran- who meet with the intent of getting 
Cisco Call-Bulletin, he came into to know each other on an informal 




VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 



basis to facilitate foi-mal contacts 
and to deal with such issues as 
health and welfare, salaries and a 
code of ethics for men in their 
field. On his wall stands a certifi- 
cate from the American Society for 
Public Administration for attend- 
ance at the Management Institute 
conducted in 1961 by the society, 
on a national basis, at Boulder, 
Colo. 

"Elliott has, then, both the out- 
look of the 'expert' and the back- 
ground of a child of the political 
process. His outline of the budget 
procedure provides a realistic pic- 
ture of what the political scientist 
calls the 'target structure' of muni- 
cipal government, i.e., the points 
of decision making upon which in- 
terests may apply pressure." 

In his City Hall job, Elliott is 
one of seven department heads re- 
porting directly to Chief Adminis- 
trative Officer Sherman P. Duekel, 
and he is one of five officials who 
serve "at the pleasure" of the 
C.A.O. In turn, answering directly 
to Elliott are County Clerk-Record- 
er Martin Mongan, Ta.x Collector 
Basil Healey, Registrar of Voters 
Chas. A. Rogers, Public Adminis- 
trator Cornelius S. Shea, Records 
Center Superintendent L. J. Le- 
Guennec, Agiicultural Commission- 
er Raymond L. Bozzini and Sealer 
of Weights and Measures O. C. 
Skinner, Jr. 

Principal activities under his 
jurisdiction include collection of 
property taxes and parking meter 
receipts, collection of delinquent 
accounts, issuance of business and 
marriage licenses, keeping the re- 
cords of and providing clerks for 



the Superior Courts, recordini 
documents, inspection of f 
fruits and vegetables, testinj 
weighing and measuring dev 
administering estates of intest 
and of incompetents, registerin 
voters, conducting elections, 
operating the Records Center 
Farmers' Market. These activ 
involve 216 employees and an 
nual budget of 2 million doUai 

Here's a partial list of the s 
ices provided last fiscal year 
these 216 workers: 20,000 refen 
requests by City-County ager 
answered from lecords storec 
the Records Center; 15,000 Si 
rior Court records filed and 
dexed; 120,000 documents rec 
ed and indexed; 7,000 marriag( 
censes issued; 400,000 voters : 
istered and 360,000 votes coun 
500 estates probated; 200 guard 
ships handled; 200 tons of c 
collected from parking met 
75,000 business licenses issi 
38,000 delinquent accounts sett 
$130,000,000 in property taxes 
lected; 2,225,000 packaged c 
modifies inspected; 60,000 we: 
ing and measuring devices tes* 
8.000.000 fresh fruit and veget! 
containers inspected; 1,500,000 < 
en eggs tested, and 7,000 tons 
farm produce sold through 
Faimers' Market. 

Fees from services more t 
offset operational costs for 
offices of Recorder, Public Adr 
istrator. Public Guardian and 
Farmers' Market. Fees helped n 
e.\penses in the offices of Tax i 
lector, Registrar, County CI 
and Agricultural Conunissioi 
Altogether, fees fro ni serv 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

1745 FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 3« California 

UNderhiU 1-14SS 



The Bank of TOKYO of California 

SAN FRANCISCO 



64 SUTTER STREET 



YU 1-1201 



Japan Center Brancli of Bank of TOKYO | 

BUCHANAN and SUTTER STS. FI 6-7601 




SHERMAN P. DUCKEL 
Chief Administrative Officer 

ioiint<-<l to .$800,000, or 40 i>er 
it of the iuiiiiml operiiting costs 
tlu> 10 offices under Elliott's di- 
;tion. 

"Salary costs represent 87 per 
nt of our annual budget." he 
ints out. "This suggests that it 
in the area of personnel services 
lere we should try hardest to 
ect economies, while at the same 
!ie striving toward more modern 
irk methods and techniques." 
He says one effort is directed lo- 
rd improving public relations. 
ur employees meet the public 
thou.sands of over-the-counter 
1 over-the-phone contacts every 
y. The public's ( taxpayer's I im- 
^ssion of how well we are doing 
r job is measured to a very large 
;ent on how well we handle these 
■sonal contacts. No matter how 
ich technical knowledge our peo- 
may possess, our day-to-day 




ken in iy58, shows Elliott, left, be 

^j J ^ „aniel R. S 

:y and the ability to get along Coyrt of Appeals, then a Superior Court Judge. 



., J , , , This picture, taken in ly^tf. 

cess depends largely on person- r- '^ , „ j u i .■ r-> ■ t d cu 
° • ^ rinance and Records by Justice Daniel R. Sno 



as Director of 
State District 



with the public. All this, of course, 
presupposes that we do our job 
well and efficiently." 

He is particularly anxious to 
adapt modern mechanized methods 
to office procedures, many of which 
still arc being performed manually. 
He is enthusiastic about the City 
Hall project to change over many 
routine operations to electronic 
data processing. As part of this 
project, it is planned to inaugu- 
rate EDP in the billing and collect- 
ing of property taxes as of July 1, 
1963. Soon afterwards, he hopes, 
KDP can be applied to the multiple 
uses of voter registration certifi- 
cates. In the interim, he is plan- 
ning to install by next Jan. 1 a 
mechanical system for producing 
the Recorder's index. Under this 
|ilan, it will become a truly alpha- 
betical index. The present index 
is compiled in longhand. 

Elliott has obtained approval for 
funds to .speed up the microfilming 
of records, including Recorder's 
documents going back to 1906. 
Microfilmed records facilitates ref- 
erence work, conserves filing space 
and enables storing of a security 
copy on film in the underground 
vault. His responsibilities in this 
area have just been enlarged. Un- 
der terms of a new ordinance, he 
will serve as Records Preservation 
Officer for all City-County depart- 
ments and make periodic recom- 
mendations concerning which rec- 
ords should be classified as "essen- 
tial" and be safeguarded against 
natural or man-caused disasters. 

Elliott's work-day is comprised 

of consulting with his immediate 

subordinates, his boss Mr. Duckel, 

and other City-County officials; 

( Continued on Page 10) 



CALIFORNIA WATER & TELEPHONE CO. 

300 Montgomery St. 
GArfield 1-4826 San Francisco 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD SIREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

Sweetheart Hams and Bacon 
"Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 





'^^-' 


Claude Berhouet and Claudine Berhouet, Props. 




aTS 


Hotel de France 




m^ 


BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 




780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



COLA-BIANCHI 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

Custom Made Venslian Blinds i Window Shades In Many Decorative Colors 

Free Estimates - Pick Up and Delivery 

Venetian Blinds Laundered. Reconditioned to Their Original Beauty 
24-HOUR SERVICE 

2407 Folsom VA. 4-3221 



ME-JULY, 1952 



^verdrup & 
Parcel. 



Engineers 
Architects 



417 MONTGOMERY 
EXbrook 2-8927 

E. MARTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Established 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco. California 

EXbrook 7-2760 

Stan Seaman 

California Trophy and Engraving Co. 

PRospcct 6-6932 

Jewelry — Diamonds — Watches 

299 Ellis Street Sail Francisco 2, California 



MEIS AT WORK 




This dramatic photo, taken during the recent tunnel fire and disaster, sho 
a truckman being helped from the tunnel. Note the deep lines of fatig 
etched on the faces of all four men in the picture. 



HASTIE 



Real Estate Protection and Repair, Inc. 

Termites - Fungi - Beetles 

225 CAPITOL AVENUE 
San Francisco 12, Calif. DElauare 3-3700 

HARRY H. HASTIE 



Hang Ah Tea Room 

1 HANG AH STREET 
San Francisco 8, California 

Phone YU 2-5686 

H.mrs II A.M. to ? P.M. Closed Every Monday 



Congratulations to the 

NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL 

for its Outstandini; Work, 

INTERNATIONAL BUILDING 



ST. MARY'S SQUARE 



San Francisco 8 



Around and About 



Ky WHIT HKNKY 

AN FRANCISCO RESTAURANTS arc famous in part because of 
the subtle blending of herbs and spices by its justly noted chefs, 
jm far away places come these flavorinfj agents. I am listing a 
Tiber of them alphabetically, followed, in order of importance, the 
ces of origin. 

LUspice Jamaica. Mexico, Bra- 
Leeward Islands. 
Inise — Spain. Mexico. 
Sasil — India. Persia. 
Jay Leaves Turkey, Greece, 
•tugal. Yugoslavia. 
Capsicum West Africa, South- 
United States, Japan. 
;ayenne Pepper Louisiana, Cal- 
•nia. West Africa. 
Jaraway — Netherlands. 
Jardamon — India, Guatemala. 
r\on. 

;elerv Seed — India, France. 
;hili Powder — Southwest United 
tes. 

;innamon — China. Indo-China, 
lonesia. South Vietnam. 
;ioves -- British East Africa, 
dagascar. 

;oiiander Seed — Yugoslavia. 
:nch Morocco. 

;umin- -Iran. French Morocco. 
;uiry Powder — India. 
)ill Seed -India. United States. 




•■Iron Men and Wwdcn Ships" 
brought spices to San Francisco 

Fennel —India. Rumania. 

Fenugreek Seed — India, France, 
Lebanon, Argentina. 

Garlic — United States. 

Ginger — Jamaica, British West 
Indies. Nigeria, India. 

Mace — Indonesia, West Indies. 

Marjoram — France. Chile. Peru. 

Mint — United States. 

Mustard — United States, Can- 
ada, Denmark, Netherlands. 
( Continued on Page 12 1 



REAL ESTATE 



INSURANCE 



FRANK Bldg. & Land Corp. 

F. E. FRANK and F. C. FRANK, Cotitraclor 

TWX-SF 1174 

1500 GENEVA AVENUE - SAN FRANCISCO 24 - DE. 3-1230 



Mmc. J. G. DUPORT 

MODEL FRENCH LAUNDRY 

1861 UNION STREET 

Phone WEst 1-5984 San Francisco 9, Califoi 



It's the TALK of the Town 



Phone MA. 1-1972 



MARIE & SAM*S 
Cleaners and Laundry 

ALTERATIONS OF ALL KINDS 
381 GUERRERO ST. (Cora Bellotti) San Franc 

CRAFTSMEN TOOL RENTAL, INC. 

1265 FOLSOM STREET — UN 3-8383 

San Francisco, California 

THE WESTERN HARDWARE & TOOL CO. 

Safety Equipment, Tools .ind Supplies for Lineman. Electricians, 

Iron Workers, Bridge, Structural. Ornamental and Re-enforccd 

Steel Workers, Welders, Welders' Leather Hoods and Gloves 

OPEN 9-^ -SATURDAYS 9-4 



122 . 10th STREET 



UNderhill 3-4540 




420 Market Street 
San Francisco II, California 



Custom-Aire 
Products 

Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Forced Air - Gas Fired Heaters 

& Wall Furnaces 

Air Conditioning 



600 Indiana Street 
VA 6-7171 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

Thomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
Lombard 4-0180 

EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Newe:t Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational View 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-2928 

Reasonable Rates — Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 

North Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



Baalietball, BjiMb.ill, Football, Softball, Goll, Track, Tennu, Bowline 
Unifomu, Trophies BC Medals, Ski Rentals, Hunting, Fishinj; 



FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 



140-1 1 ARAVAL STRI IT 



■JE-JL'LY, 1962 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AIVD COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Hall MA 1-016J 

C.eorse Christopher. Mayor 

.lohii n. Sullivan. Exerutivc Secretary 
Uohert M. .Smaliey. Confidential Secretary 
Margaret Smith. Personal Secretary 
.lohn I,. Montz. Administrative Assistant 
Uohert Rockwell. Puljiic Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

235 Citv Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Peter Tamara.-!. President. 1020 Harrison 
William C. Blake. SO Folsom St. 
Roger noa.s. 2323 C.eary St. 
.loseph M. Casey. 2528 Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Dobb.s. 351 California St. 
nr Charles A. Ertola. 2.13 Columbus Ave. 
.Tohn J. Ferdon. 155 Monteomery St. 
.Tames 1,. Halley. S70 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 
Jack Morrison. 2500 Greenwich St. 
.Joseph E. Tinney. 2517 Mission St. 

Robert .T. Dolan. Clerk 

Lillian M. Senter. Chief As.sistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial &• Industrial Development— Boas. Blake. 

County. State and National Affairs— Ferdon, Dobbs. 
McMahon 

Education, Parks and Recreation — Ertola. Blake. 
Casey 

Finance Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs, Ferdon. 
Halley 

.liidiciary. LeKLslative and Civil Service — Tinney. 
McMahon. Morrison 

Police — Casey. Ertola. Tinney 

Public Buildings. I^ands and City Planning — Mor- 
rison. Boas. Tinney 

Public Health and Welfare — McMahon. Halley, Mor- 
ri.son 

Public ITlilitics— Halley. Dobbs. Ferdon 

Strnits and Highway!? — Blake. Boas. Ertola 

Hul.s— Taniaras. Dobbs. Ertola 



ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall 
Russell I.,. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

20li citv Hall 
Thomas M. U'Coiinor 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

.S,<i(i Hryant St. 
Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC OEFENDIER 

S.50 Bryant St. 
Edward T. Mancusj 

SHERIFF 

331 City Hall 
Matthew C. Cnrhr-riv 



HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 
Fourth Floor, City Hall 

Raymond J. Ai-ata 

Carl H. Alien 

Byron Arnold 

John W. Bussev 

Walter Carpeneti 

C. Harold Caulfield 

Melvyn I. Cronin 

Norman Elklngton 

Timothy 1. Fitzpatrick 

.Irfseph Karesh 
i.-rald S. 1-evin 

Joseph M. Cummins, Sec 
480 City Hall 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall 
.\ndrew J. Kyinan. Presiding 
Albert A. Axelrod 



Daly 



UN 1-S552 
Francis McCarty 
Edward Molkenbuhr 
Clarence W. Morris 
Harry J. Neubarth 
llaymond J. O'Connoi 
Edward F. O'Day 
Charles S. Peery 
George W. Schonfeld 
William F. Traverse 
Alvin E. Weinberger 
H. A. van der Zee 



KL 2-3008 
Leland J. Lazarus 
Clarence A. Linn 
George E. Maione 
William A. DBrIc 
L,enoreD. Underwood 
James J. Welsh 



Itobi 

Bernard B. Cllckf.ld 

Clayton W. Horn 

James M. Cannon, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

.\UBUSt 1. PMIJ 

TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

s:,i\ Bryant St. KL 2-3lJ(l 

James L.-ddy. chi.r Hivl.^ioii CUtU 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-855 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
William McDonnell, Foreman 
Dr. Donald Schulz. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

S.SIl Bryant St. KL 3-011 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Office 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 300 Fremont St. 
William Moskovitz. 6030 Geary Blvd. 
Robert A. Peabodv. 456 Post St. 
Adolph L. Pierotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto, 405 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

376 Woodside Ave. SE l-ii-i 



JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman, 440 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger, 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
Rev. James B. Fiynn. 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Boswell. la75 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl. 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

.Maurice Shean 

940 - 25th St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator, Sacramento, during Sessions 



-300S 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley, M.D., 460 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Nell Sinton, 1020 Francisco St. 

.Ii.lui K, Hagcpian. 2211 Hush St. 

Mark Harris, lUlJO Holloway 

H.-lty Jackson. 2S.i5 Vallejo St. 

William E. Kiuith, tlllMi Holloway Ave. 

Joseph Esherick, 2005 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President. California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. HIO 1 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 
Gardner W. Meln. Pres.. 315 Montgomery St. 
Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. 
James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 
George Thomas Rockrise. 405 Sansome St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy, Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller. Secretary 



HE 1-2 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Hubert J. Sober. President. 155 Montgomery St. 
Richard C. Ham. Vice Pres.. 200 Bush St. : 

Wni. Kilpatrick, 827 Hyde St. j 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel i 

DISASTER CORPS 

850 Bryant St. KL 3-1 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook. USN (Ret.), Director 
Alex X. McCausland, Public Information Office: 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-i 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 
170 Fell St. 

Samuel Ladar, President. Ill Sutter St. 

Mrs. Lawrence Draper, Jr.. 10 Walnut St. 

Adolfo dp Urioste. 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Edward Kemmitt. 601 Polk St. 

Mrs. Claire Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 

Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 



E. Strattcn. 800 Presidio Ave. 
Dr. Harold Spears. Supt. of Schools and Sei 



FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 1-i 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

Dr. Peter Angel. President. 1867 -15th Av.-. 

Charles R. Greenstone. 182 Second St. 

Philip Dindia. 536 Bryant St. 

William F. Murray, Chief of Department 
Albert B. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1-1 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook, President, 220 Montgomery S 

George W. Cuniffe, 1627 - 25th Ave. 

Donald M. Campbell. M.D., 977 Valencia St. 

Frank J. Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave. 

Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Robert E. Hunt, Claims Supervisor 
Lyle J. O'Connell, Executive Director 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3-1 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jacob Shemano, Chairman. 130 Montgomery St. 
John E. Gurich, 300 Montgomery St. 
Solomon B. Johnson, 704 Market St. 
Charles J. Jung. 622 Washington St. 
Joseph P. Mazzola, 1621 Market St. 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. 1 1 10 I- 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 

John E. Sullivan, Chairman, 69 West Portal 
Arthur S. Becker, 3476 California St. 
Donald Magnin, 77 O'Farreli St. 
G. Baltzer Peterson. 2910 Vallejo St. 
David Thomson, 65 Berry St. 

Vining T. Fisher, General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 



ERMIT APPEALS. 



Mux M(>..iv. Prisidcnt 
•llllnni H. H. Dnvls. ;IS4 Knlaom St. 
eors.' nillln. 4091 - 19th Ave. 
larenco J, Walsh. 2450 - 17th St. 
rnpst I... West. SG.'i MontKoniery St. 
J. Kiiwin Mattox. Kxefutlve S.ir 



OLICE COMMISSION 

850 Bryant St. Kl. :Mil2:l 

Meets every Monday at B:00 P.M. 
arold K JleKln?ion. President. 255 (■:ilil..nii;i St 
lul A. HIa.slnKer. 415 Sansirtne St. 
on Faziukerley. .S5i Howard St. 

Thoma.i J. Cahill. Chief of Polite 
Alfred J. Nelder. Deputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas Zara^oza, Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel P. McKlem. Chief of Inspeitdrs 
I.,t. Wm. J. O'Brien, Commission Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler, Deiiartment Secretary 

UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center HK 1-2121 

Meets 1st Tuesday of nionlh at :l::lll P.M. 

nomas W. s. \Vu. D.D.S., Presidi-nt 
(hn M. Bransten. 665 - 3rd St. 
'. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 
jse M Fanucchl. 1445 Stockton St. 
ortimer Kleishhacker. Jr.. 601 California SI. 
arearet V. Girdner. 21.10 Fulton St. 
Iward E. Heavey, SH Post St. 
Ilfon K. bepetlch. 1655 Polk Street 
rs. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 
fv. William Turner. 1642 Broderlck St. 
!.«•.■ Vavuris. Him Ceary St. 

Wliham R. Ilolman. Librarian 

Frank A. Ciarvoe. Jr.. Secretary 

JBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hail HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
uart N. CreenljerR. President, 765 Fol.som St. 
•rl Simon, 13511 Foisom St. 
sorge F. Hansen, 215 Market St. 
lomas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 
lomas F. Stack. 703 Market St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood, Manager of Utilities 

James J. Finn. Secretary to Commission 

Bureaus and Departments 
icounts, 2S7 City Hall HE 1-2121 

GfOrge Negri, Director 
rport, San Francisco International, S. F. 28 

Belford Brown. Manager PI., 6-0500 

;tch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Oral L. Moore. Hen. llgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 

jnjcipal Railway, 'J49 Presidio Ave. Fl 6-5656 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
irsonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. Fl 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning, Director 
iblic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
ater Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner, General Manager 

JBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
585 Bush St. EX 7-6000 

Meets 1st and :ird Thur.sdav ea<h month 
at 9 A.M. 

ank H. Sloss, President. 351 California St. 
. Xavier Barrios. 2325 Ocean Ave. 
■s. Margaret R. JIurray, 1306 Portola Drive 
llUam P. Scott. Jr.. 249 Natoma St. 
cqueline Smith, 2015 Steiner St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Kulala Smith, Secretary 

iCREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLaren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4866 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each niontli 
at 3 P.M. 

niter A. Haas. Sr., President, 98 Battery St. 

ter Ber.ut, 1333 Jones St. 

»ry Margaret Casey. 532 Mission St. 

Uliam M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

'. Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

«. Joseph J. Moore, Jr.. 2000 Wa.slilngton St. 

hn F. Conway. Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell, General ^lanager 
Paul N. Moore, Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gate Ave. ir.N .1-7750 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Everett Griffin. Chairman. 465 California St. 
James B. Black. Jr. 120 Montgomerv St. 
James A. Folcer. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. S35 Market St. 
Lawrence R. Palaclns. 355 Haves St. 

M. Justin Herman Rvo.ntlvo Director 

M. C. Hermann. S.^.i-.tary 

RETIREMENT SVSTEIVI BOARD 

i.'.o .M.Aiii.si,.r SI. Ill': i-:;i2i 






.M. 



St. 



James M. llariiill. 12il .Muntgomery St. 
Daniel A. I M.z, :;251 - ;i5th Ave. 
WilliaTO T. Heed, 2151 - l.Sth Ave. 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attoi-ney 

Dani.l Mattrocce, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans liviilding MA 1-6600 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Frederic Campagnoll President. 300 Montgomery 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Frank A. Flynn. 1549 Noriega St. 
Prcntis C. Hale. Jr.. 867 Market St. 
George T. Davis, 111 Sutter St. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson. 19 Mavwood Drive 
Wilson Meyer, 333 Montgomery St. 
Ouido J. Musto, 535 North Point 
Samuel D. Sayad. 35 Antes Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Directoi- 

E. Lawrence George, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HiO 1-2O40 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural BIdg., Embarcadero SU 1-300S 

R.-.ymond L. Bozzini, Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayslmre & Alemany 

Frank J. O'Connell, Market Master Ml 7-942.1 

CORONER 

S50 Bryant St. KL 3-1694 

Dr. Henry W. Turk.-l 



HE 1-2121 
D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Doyle L. Smith. SuperiTitendcnt of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-8000. Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 Cit.v Mall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk-Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin Jlongan. 317 (.'ily Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Sliea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voteis HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Kugeis. 167 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hail 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

L. J. Leljuecuiec. l.oO OtlS 

HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEmlock 1-2121. Ext. 704 
Harry I. Bigarani. 1384 York St. 
Lioyd Conricli. 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea. 333 Montgomery 
Waiter Newman, J. Magnin, Stockton & O'Farreli 



ik E. Oman, 557 - 4th St. 

Bernard A. Cummings, Secretary, 254 City Hall 

Ex-Officio Members: 

R. McCanhv. Director of City Planning 



.\lu 



Lirban Renewal Co-ordii 



iitor 



PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

I If. .Szu T. Tsfju, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home. Tth Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

Louis A. .Muraii. Superintendent MO 4-15S0 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. E. Alters. Superintendent MI 8-S200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake. Adni. Superintendent HE 1-2800 
PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 
R. Brooks Larter. 

Assistant Director, Administrative 
S. Myron Tatarian 

Asst. Director. .Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 
Accounts, 260 City Hall 

J. .1. MeCloskey, Supervisor 
Architecture. 205 City Hall 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 45" McAllister St. 

Hobert C. 1-evy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army 

.\ H. Kknnherg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. 450 .M.AMIst.r St. 

Sidney Franklin. Sui)ervlaor 
Egineering. 359 City Hall 

Cliff,, rd J. f;,.,.rtz, Cltv Engineer 

& Sewage Treatment, 2323 



Walt 



Cle 



H. 






ende 



ning, 2323 Army St. 

i;.iriard M. Grotty, Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. 

K. D. Brown. Superintendent 
Urban Renewal 150 McAllister St. 

Il.-rniir,l A. Ciiiniiilngs. Analyst 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 

11. 11 n.nas. Purchaser of Supplies 

I', l'', Conway, Chief Assistant 
I'liribaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. .M. Flaherty. Suprrinlendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harri 



HE 1-2121 

HE 1-2121 

HE 1-2121 

HE 1-2121 

HE 1-2121 

HE 1-2121 

Army St. 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 

HE 1-2121 

HE I-2I21 



10. l,f 



Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 50 
George Stanley. Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 Mc-Allls(er St. 
Philip L. Rezos, Director of Property 
James T. Graham, Auditorium Mcr] 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 City Hall ) 

O. C. Skinner, Jr 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park ra 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park jja 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April, June, Oct 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 
.Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President 

2 Pine St. 
Alexander de Brctteville. Honoiary Member. 2000 

U ashington St. 
Mr?,'. '-^- 'I'obin Clark, House on Hill. .San Mateo 

~ ''" ■■ "" ler. 315 MontKom- 



W. Mein. Honorar 
• St. 



Mrs. Alexander Albert, 2320 Lyons St 
Joseph M. Bi-ansten, 665 - 3rd"st 
W alter E. Buck. President, 235 Montgomery St 
li-. Raymond Armsby, 111 Sutter St. 
Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumrn St. 
Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St 
.Mrs. Bruce Kelham, 15 Arguello Blvd. 
Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 
David Pleydell-Bouverle. Glen Ellen, Calif. 
John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 
William R. Wallace. Jr.. 100 Bush St. 
Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach. 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation ,& Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe. Jr.. Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gale Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. April. June. Oct., 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

.Mrs. George Camernn. Honorary President. 
Hillsborough 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Mi.ss Loui.se A. Bovd, 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper, 620 Market St. 

Charles de Young Thieriot. 1802 Florlbunda, Hills- 
borough 

R. Gwin Follis. 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Helmhucher. 220 Bu.sh St. 

Grover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garrett iMcEnerney. 11. 444 California St. 

Roscoc F. Oake.s. 220 Bush St. 

Joseph O. Tobin. 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker, Burlingamc Country Club 

Charles Page, 311 California St. 

.Mrs. William P. Itoth, Filoll. .San .Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Ri<-hard Rheem. Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalpine. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

436 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Robert J. Ever.son, Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 
2500 - 16th St. 
Charles W. I-rledrlchs. Ex. 



NE-JULY, 1962 



VIRGIL ELLIOTT 

(Continued from Page 51 
attendance at various meetings 
such as committee hearings of the 
Board of Supervisors: conferences 
with individuals and representa- 
tives of outside groups; reading, 
preparing and signing of reports, 
correspondence and various other 
official papers. He makes frequent 
public appearances and talks as a 
representative of his own depart- 
ment or in behalf of Mr. Duckel or 
Mayor George Christopher. 

The City-County charter charges 
him specifically with administering 
the functions and personnel of his 
department. As is the case with 
other department heads, he must 
leview and approve personnel re- 
quisitions, appointments, disciplin- 
ary actions and terminations; he i.s 
responsible for requisitioning and 
receiving of equipment, materials 
and supplies; he must approve 
work orders, warrant requests, re- 
volving fund vouchers, budget re- 
quests and supplemental appropri- 
ation requests. He recommends ap- 
propriate resolutions and ordin- 
ances to the Board of Supervisors, 
including suggested modifications 
in fees and licenses. And he con- 
ducts various studies and reports 
as requested by the C.A.O. 

Six of Elliott's subordinates hold 
offices which are common in all 
California counties. These county 
ofificers are governed as to their 
duties chiefly by State laws more 
than they are by local codes. How- 
ever, they depend on the local 
county to provide them with the 
personnel, materials and supplies, 
etc., with which to carry out their 



prescribed functions. The Director 
of Finance and Records is their 
"friend in court" and serves liaison 
duty in obtaining for them the 
needed personnel and operating 
funds. In addition, he coordinates 
procedures and methods and the 
use of equipment and personnel, 
between these various offices. 

Elliott is a strong advocate of 
what he terms the "clinical ap- 
proach" in his everyday work. He 
wants his colleagues to understand 
him, and he strives to understand 
them better and to accept them as 
they actually are. "By what they 
'are'," he says, "I mean that we 
constitute a social group, not just 
a work group. Each differs from 
the others and each is a product of 
his own particular environment, 
educational background, personal 
ambitions, religious and racial dif- 
ferences, traditions, etc." Elliott 
thinks his on-the-job philosophy 
produces results, and points to an 
increase in services and an actual 
decline in personnel over the past 
four years. 

A native Missourian, Elliott was 
born and raised on a farm about 
100 miles north of Kansas City. He 
worked his way through college 
as a "space rate" correspondent for 
papers in Kansas City, St. Joseph, 
Omaha and Des Moines. Thus, it 
was but a natural step for him 
to gravitate toward full-time news- 
paper reporting jobs covering city 
and/or county "beats" in St. Joe, 
Kansas City, Denver, Bakersfleld, 
and finally San Francisco. 

"My primary training in college, 
however, was in the field of educa- 
tion," he relates. "My experience 
(Continued on Page 131 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

BURLINGAME, California 



=""^BERGMAN'S 

May We Invite You 

To get acquainted with "Bergman's", a very special shop 
for those who desire the Very Best in fine quality "iust 
like new" ladies' apparel. 

Your dreams of owning a wardrobe, fashioned from superb 
fobrics, designed to complement your every contour for 
perfection of cut and detail, styled by universally known 
designers, con now come true. 

Our apparel is truly "Just Like New," featuring lotest styles 
in Imports, Originals, top designer models from eiclusive 
shops: worn only a few times by the socialities and sold 
at a fraction of the wholesale cost. 

Choose NOW a "Hattie Carnegie" or a "Monor-Bourne" 
suit: o "Lily Dachen" hat. Imported Cashmere coots, and 
take odvontoge of our convenient "Lay-Awoy" plan before 
Christmas! 

Call us fur [Private and confidential evening afi/iuintmcnl.s 

Store Hours: 1 1 :00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. daily 

NEW SAMPLES and NEW APPAREL 

direct from manufacturer at REDUCED prices 

1395 Sutter Street PR 5-7440 



Mel - Williams Company 

Canned & Frozen Food Serrice 

Manufacturer Agents and 
Canner Representatives 

15 California Street San Francisco 
Telephone: EXbrook 2-7366 


L. J. McDERMOTT & SONS, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

2111 JENNINGS STREET 

MI 8-8144 




UNIVERSAL MERCHANDISE CO. 

GIF=TS — BA2AAR SUPPLIES — TOYS 
AT WHOLESALE PRICES 

744 Mission St., near Jrd St. 
EXbrook 7-5413 
SAN FRANCISCO 


BLAI'S HOBBY SHOP 

Relax 7>ith a Hobby 

PLANES - TRAINS - MODELS 

HOBBY SUPPLIES 

2517 SAN BRUNO AVE. 

JU. 5-2033 


AJAX EXPRESS CO. 

MOVING and STORAGE 

490 - FIFTH STREET 

YUkon 6-2418 


A.B.C. CIGAR CO. 

MAIN OFFICE 
71 Haight Street MA. 1-5910 

BRANCH 

AIRLINE BUS TERMINAL 

San Francisco TUxedo 5-5039 



STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

815 BRYANT ST. at 6th MArkct 1-3063 

San Ftandsco 3, Califontia 

ED MAJOR, Manager UNderhill 3-2288 

Major's Linden Street Garage 

Combined with MASTER UNDERCOATING CO. 

Steam Cleaning, Auto-Polishing & Undcrcoating— New Car Get Ready 

Free PickVp & Delivery - Fully Insured 
24« OAK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



THE RECOR 



RELIABLE GLASS CO. 

HOMER F. SMITH 

Specializing in Auto Glass 

2015 - 16th Si. San Francisco i 

HE. 1-0684 — UN. 5-0667 



MATTEUCCI BROS. 
York Meat Market 

Choice Meals. Poultry. Fish & Eggs 
2794 - 24th St. VA. 4-5419 



W. K. Coffee Cfievron Service 

Tirei - Tubei - Accesioriei • Lube Jobs 

Brake Service and Tune-Ups 

No Extra Charge for Saturday Work 

4th AVENUE at TARAVAL ST. 

SEabrighl 1-0882 



J&J TIRE CO. 

Joseph Koppl 

955 FOLSOM ST. 

SUtter 1-7955 



SAN FRANCISCO 
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

DR. ROBIN LAUraR 

1201 ORTEGA STREET 

San Francisco 



BANK of CANTON 

555 MONTGOMERY ST. 

GA. 1-4886 

743 WASHINGTON ST. 

GA. 1-5215 

San Francisco 



ALAMEDA NURSING HOME 

24 HOUR CARE, BED S, AMBULATORY 

Patienls-Men and Women 

824 Central Ave. LA. 2-8403 

ALAMEDA 



GET IN SHAPE 

Charlie Mallon's 
Physical Culture Studio 

Conditioning—Reducing 
Body Building 

256 SUTTER STREET 
EX 7-4873 

PICKWICK 
MOTOR HOTEL 

O. C. Campbell, Mgr. 

5th 8C Mission Sts. 

San Francisco 

GA 1-7500 

Free Overnight Parking 
IS to Ball Park at Front Door 
Visit our Byline Coctail Lounge 



MERRILL S DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT 

KWI MARKET ST. 805 MARKET ST. 

San Francisco, California 

B & D Spet'do-Tachojirapli 

SERVICE 

Service oil Spccdiimotcrs. T.ichonictcrs, S.iny.inin Tachiigraphs 

•md Clocks 

575 Golden Gate Avenue DNderhill 5-283 5 

Farmers Insurance Group 

BERT WEIBLE. District Manai^cr 
2141 Lombard Street JO 7-1860 

William O. Duffy 



NOTARY PUBLIC 



2888 Mission Street 



AT 2-4151 



Consolidated Purchasing & Designing Co. 

235 MONTGOMERY STREET 
EX 2-4992 San Francisco 

San Francisco's Foremost Supplier of Hi-Fi Equipment and 
Tape Recorders 

Largest Stock for Selection. 
All available for Your Listening Pleasure. 

S. F. RADIO & SUPPLY CO. 



1284 MARKET STREET 



UNderhill 5-6000 



R. E. SALEME CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Insurance Reptiirs Our Specialty 

3376 - 18th STREET 
HE 1-0341 

San Francisco 

LOU JENNY 

MORTICIAN SUPPLIES - SALES AGENCY 



1520 - 22nd AVENUE 

San Francisco 22, California 



SE 1-5166 



KOTZBECK GALLERIES 

Fine Prints - E.xpert Framing 

Originals in Water Colors 
and Oils 



RUTHIE'S SCHOOL OF DANCE 

SpeciaUzmR in Cfuldrens Dancmg 

Expert Training — Tap, Ballet. 

Character 6? Acrohatic 

in<> Torovol St. OV 1-5226 



STANDARD GARAGE 
Automotive Service 

23 3 DRUMM STREET 
SU 1-2744 



Baylacq French Laundry 

SK 1091 
116 CLEMENT STREET 



Le Trianon Restaurant 

242 OFARRELL ST. 
YU 6-9355 
San Francisco 



B&M GARAGE 

Complete Auto Service 
Inside Parking - Reasonable Rales 
TV 5-6056 469 Eddy St. 



RICHFIELD SERVICE 

George 3C Jim Nakamura 

3701 GEARY BLVD. 

BA 1-3797 



TUNNELL MARKET 

Groceries ■ Fruits ■ Vegetables 

174 WEST PORTAL AVE. 

MO 4-7300 



Stephen P. Eriach. M.D. 

Hours 2-4 and by Appointment 

Phone HEmlock 1-7444 

3004 - 16th STREET 

San Francisco 

Re... Phone JUniper 4-2420 



Automatic Home 
Laundry Service 

For Complete Ser\'ice 
Call YU 2-0364 
60 Clara St. San Francis 



Hunt's Quality Donuts 

M.^IN BR.»,Nf;H 
2400 Mission Street — Mission 7.99J1 

Other Locations: East Bay 
and Peninsula 



Clay Bernard 

A.<s.iil,.nt to Vice PrcsiJont 
S,,K-s. Public Relations 

WESTERN AIRLINES 

635 Market St. GA 1-40 



The Barrel! House 

EX "-1833 
46 - 3rd STREET 



>JE-JULY. 1962 



WHIT HENRY 

( Continued from Page 7 i 

Nutmeg - East India. Unitmi 
States. 

Oregano Me.xico. Greece. Ital.v, 
Fiance. 

Papril<a— Spain. Hungary. Yugo- 
slavia. 

Parsley— United States. 

Pepper. Black— India. Indonesia, 
British Malaya. Java. 

Pepper, Red The Carolinas. Cal- 
ifornia. Louisiana. Turkey. 

Poppy Seed— Netherlands, Pol- 
and. Argentina, Iran. 

Rosemary—France, Spain, Por- 
tugal. 

Saffron — Spain. 

Sage Yugoslavia. 

Savory — France. 

Sesame Seed — Nicaragua, Salva- 
dor, Egypt, Brazil. 

Tarragon — United States. 

Thyme - France. Spain. United 
States. 

Turmeric — India. Haiti. Jamaica. 
Pei'u. 

Melon season is here and one of 
the mo.st delicious is the Honey 
Dew. No other melon can be as 
deceiving as the Honey Dew, but a 
few simple rules can enable any- 
body to find the good ones. 

"The most important thing is 
aroma." says Harlan K. Pratt of 
the University of California Vege- 
table Crops Department. "Sniff the 
blossom end. opposite the stem. If 
the aroma is there, the flavor is 
too. 

Check for these additional in- 
dications of ripeness: 

A slightly wa.xy feel, as if the 
melon has actually been waxed. 

Cream to white color, with no 
trace of green. Springiness or soft- 
ness at the blossom end. 



Why are these consumer tests 
so important for Honey Dews? 
Of all melons, Pratt explains, only 
the Honey Dew grows to full size 
and then either ripens or -if things 
go wrong just sits there indefin- 
itely, hard and unappetizing. 

The difference is a result of nat- 
ural ethylene gas. Internal ethy- 
lene "triggers" ripening in all mel- 
ons, but in Honey Dews on the vine 
it does not reach the triggeiing 
concentration until several weeks 
after full size is reached. If the 
melon i.s picked before that time, 
the process of ripening may never 
get started. 

To again quote Mr. Pratt: "When 
in doubt — sniff." 

And here is a delightful bit of 
verse by the Irish poet, Thomas 
Moore; 
"Say, why did Time his glass sub- 
lime 
Fill up with sands unsightly. 
When wine, he knew, runs brisk- 
ly through 
And sparkles far more brightly." 

Visit Monterey, Pacific Grove, or 
Carpinteria and you're almost sure 
to hear about the butterflies. 

In this case, points out the Na- 
tional Automobile Club, the butter- 
flies will be the giant Monarchs, 
their reddish-brown wings veined 
with black. And you'll hear about 
them because of their most unusual 
.semi-annual migratory flight that 
takes them over the hundreds of 
miles from Alaska to California. 

There are migratory flights and 
migratory flights, but that of the 
Monarchs is most unusual for they 
fly only one way and then die; their 
progeny fly back to the starting 
point in Alaska. 

Let us look at the cycle as it 



occurs each year. In the late sum- 
mer. Monarchs from the meadow- 
lands of Alaska start to congre- 
gate in large groups and move 
down the coast. As they go, they 
are joined by other Monarchs along 
the way and soon great masses of 
them are winging their way south- 
ward. Down along Washington and 
Oregon they go. and into Califor- 
nia. 

In central California they wing 
out across Monterey Bay and then 
begin to take to the trees at Mon- 
terey, Pacififlc Grove, and farther 
.south at Carpinteria. On the same 
Monterey pines and live oaks on 
which they have been swarming for 
years, they settle down, each hang- 
ing to the end of a pine needle, 
wings folded, dormant. For four 
long months they nap there, and 
then, with the coming of spring, 
they awaken. 

In the early spring they breed 
and die. Their progeny flutter 
about the hills and valleys, feed- 
ing on the milkweed, gaining 
strength for the long journey to 
the North. And then, one day, 
these butterflies born in Monterey 
begin to move out in little groups, 
begin to move up the coast. North- 
ward they go, feeding lightly on 
plant nectar as they go, and com- 
ing at last to the meadowlands that 
their grandparents had left the late 
summer before. There they will 
breed and die and their progeny 
will come down to Monterey. 

So strange is this flight that each 
year the arrival of the Monarchs is 
celebrated by a Butterfly Pageant 
in Pacific Grove and police of the 
area are not slow to arrest anyone 
found disturbing or destroying the 
butterflies during their long winter 
sleep. 



(ioldenrath's 
Penthouse BuHeteria 

AT 

H. LIEBES & CO 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 
an Shopping Niles 

Grant Ave and Geary 

GA. 1-6240 



San Francisco Meat Co. 

Finest Quality Fresh Meals 
Also, We Specialize in Veal 



WHOLESALE and RETAIL 
HUGO FAMBRINI 

1310 GRANT AVENUE 
DO. 2-8480 



DELIA'S COFFEE CUP 



Featuring the Finest of 


MEXICAN FOOD 


Enchiladas. Tacos. Tannales, Tostadas, 


Chili, Rellenos. Chili Verde 


and other Famous Dishes 


Open Daily— Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 


4019 JUDAH STREET 


Between 45th and 46th 


Phone. SE. 1-9561 


Phone: WAInut 1-4758 


A Community Chest Agency 


BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 


Community Serricc Center 


James E. Stratten, Exec. Dir. 


800 PRESIDIO AVENUE 


San Francisco 15 



Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Estahlishcd 1894 

RRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 

Exxecutive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, California 

Anderson & Perkins, Inc. 

Licensed dc Bonded — Bonded Correspondents at All Points 

Specialized Collection Service 

Phone EXbrook 2-8466 

31 GEARY STREET 

San Francisco 8 



Koret of California^ Inc. 

611 MISSION STREET 
San Francisco 5, California 



"The HERTZ Corporation'^ 
HERTZ RENT A CAR 

43J MASON STREET ORdway 3-4666 

HERTZ RENT A TRUCK 

1480 FOLSOM STREET LJNderhill 1-6870 

HERTZ CAR LEASING DIVISION 

1480 FOLSOM STREET MArket 1-9755 



THE RECO( 



VIRGIL ELLIOTT 

(Continued from Page 10) 

this field has boon limited I" 
Be years two in Colorado and 

in Los Angeles." The compar- 
;ely low salaries in education 
;ouragcd him. he says, adding; 
still believe that the monetary 
■ard in this field is insufficient 
attract and hold the desired 
nber of capable persons, espe- 
lly men with family responsi- 
ties." 

le is convinced that newspaper 
orting related to governmental 
ivities, coupled with a college 
phasis in government and soci- 
jy, and some experience in 
ching, affords an excellent back- 
und for a career in government, 
recommend it for anyone inter- 
»d in administrative-type work. 
A'spapering develops within you 
its for asking questions, for 
ting answers, for cutting red 
e, for meeting deadlines and 

being factual. Teaching helps 
1 to make yourself better under- 
od to others, and I can't say 
lugh about the importance of 
)d communication in administra- 
1. 

To these observations, I would 
1 that I stress the value of con- 
ned formal study for the admin- 
rator as he advances in his ca- 
r. The skills we develop through 
ictice on the job need to be tem- 
•ed and modified through the 
dy of accepted administrative 
hniques." 



Elliott piactires what ho 
preaches, for it was he who, two 
years ago, interested the Univer- 
sity of California Extension Service 
in bringing nuinagement training 
courses to the City Hall. Classes 
have averaged between 40 and 60 
in one-night-a-week sessions for 
the past two years. And the City- 
County employee - students have 
paid for the tuition and textbooks 
out of their own pockets. 

Elliott is a member of the Muni- 
cipal Executive Employees' Associ- 
ation, the Press and Union League 
Club, the Commonwealth Club of 
California, the 'Western Govern- 
mental Research Association and 
the American Society for Public 
Administration. At the Society's 
national conference last April in 
Detroit, he participated in a panel 
discussion on inteijuri.sdictional 
problems. 

A United Presbyterian elder, El- 
liott attends Lakeside Presbyterian 
Church with his wife, Helen, and 
their children, Susan, age 5, and 
Edgar, 2. They reside at 275 Mid- 
dlefield Drive. Mrs. Elliott also has 
a governmental background, hav- 
ing worked with the Atomic En- 
ergy Commission for six years. 

In fact, interest in government 
seems to run in the family. A 
great-uncle was a former Congress- 
man from Missouri. An uncle now 
is a city councilman in Prescott, 
Arizona, and a brother-in-law in 
North Kansas City is a councilman 
there. Another uncle and a cousin 
serve in judicial posts in Missouri. 



TIN YIN JAN & CO. 

Barbecued Park and Spareribs 
041 Stockton St Yi;. 2-3i48 


TEMPO-VANE 
Manufacturing Co. 

Everything for the Coffee Industry 

Equipment— Parts— Service 

Telephone: SUtter 1-1076, 1-1480 

330 FIRST STREET 

San Francisco, California 


KEAN HOTEL 

1018 Mission Street 
MA 1-9291 


CHEVRON SERVICE 

Roy L. Strong 
799 Ocean Ave. Db 3-9945 




Tops Re-covered and Repaired 

Seat Covers Tailored to Fit 

Cushions and Upholstery Built 

and Repaired 

The Jamison 
Auto Top Company 

1581 BOSH STREET 

Charley Si. Nellis Bernhardy 

ORdway 3-3170 


Frank Huck Paint Co. 

5707 GEARY BLVD. 
SK 2-1722 


A-1 DELICATESSEN 

U!0 HAIGHT STRtKT 
MA 1.7J7I 


BLOE EAGLE CAFE 

H19 Fillmore Slreel 


Schmitt Plumbing & Heating 

.MK <,1)NI)1TI(1N1N<. 

■Let Ccnrgc Do It ■ 

)28I MISSION STREET 
AT 2-3646 


SCOTTY'S TRANSMISSIONS 

1 lr,,:m:,l K,l,i„at.- ,, .Ml V,.u I',v 

Rear Ends - Clutches 

N„ ■J.iclccJ-up' Rcp.iir BilU 

652 EIIi> St., bet. Larltin Si Hyde 

Also 14J Scoll St., San Frantrisco, Calif. 

UN 1-2048 Open Saturdays UN 1-2058 



(OATEN. HERFURTII & ENGLAND 

CdNSULTINC; ACTUARIF.S 

Offices in 
San Francisco — Denver — Pasadena 

Telephone 
SUtter 1-1724 

CROCKER BUILDING 

San Francisco 4 

SHIPOWNERS & MERCHANTS TOWBOAT CO., LTD. 
RED STACK LINE 

Ocean, Harbor dC Coastwise Towing 
Salvage Service 

Pier 25 DO. 2-3474 

San Francisco 

Sunset Scavenger G>rp. 

Rubbish Hauling and Basement Cleaning 

Foot of Tnnnell Ave. & Beatty Road, Bayshore 
JU. 6-7500 

JACK TAR HOTEL 

Van Ness & Geary 
San Francisco 



HUDSON SHOES 

Shoes for the Entire Family 

Serve Yourself and SAVE 

4594 MISSION STREET 
iO 5-9810 



AA SALVAGE CO. 

Metals of All Kinds 

DAVID HARRIS 

1375 EVANS AVENOE 
VA 4-8734 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 
Instruments for Hand Surgery 
Active Hand 8C Finger Splints 

70 -12th STREET 
MA 1-6876 



Kittred^e School 

Continuous Summer Sessions 

Opening Date, June 25th 

1st thru 8th— Remedial 9th 
.\I.\Ki;-ri' WORK for Blrls and 
l.c.ys ill .siluM.l suliji-i-ta— Reatilnc, 
.SiM-iliiiK. I.,ttnguaicf», Arithmetic. 

ili.NCKNTRATRI) course de- 
simu-ij for .superior students. 

KIC.MKDIAI^ READIXG lirogrnni. 
plus readinK for speed and compre- 
hension. 
Pupils may enroll 4 or more weeks 

2355 Lake Street SK 1-3050 



INE-JULY, 1962 



BAY WINDOW 

ii-ontimied from Page 3i 

your Better Business Buremi! We 

are calling "XlSeZMeTS . . . " 

Whoosh, Barbara Stanwyck. 

move over! Sorry, wrong number! 

READING THE PAPERS: Be- 
tween the lines, that is. If you're 
an accomplished between-the-lines 
reader, what fun the contracting 
press of San Francisco offers! And 
what intriguing questions such a 
pasttime poses! 

Like: Will the Examiner and the 
Hearstized News-Call merge to 
produce a single around-the-clock 
daily? The omens are there. The 
two papers now share one publish- 
er, one general manager, one busi- 
ness manager. Charlie Gould, who 
was sent out We.st from the New 
York Journal-American last No- 
vember in an effort to change the 
tide in the Examiner-Chronicle cir- 
culation battle, is one of the smart- 
est in the business. With him as 
publisher of the Examiner and 
News-Call, expect to see the cir- 
culation sparks fly. 

Editorially the two papers have 
acquired a new management look. 
Ed Dooley. a top Hearst man from 
Denver, has just skipped several 
Examiner grades, from assistant 



managing editor to editor. And 
he's been augmented by Jack Wal- 
lace as executive editoi'. It will 
be inteicsting to see the Dooley- 
Wallai-e team take on The Chron- 
icle, particularly since Wallace 
started newspapering in the West 
as one of the original Chronicle 
"brain trusters" of the Paul C. 
Smith era. 

Down on Howard Street the 
News-Call's former news editor, 
Tom Eastham. has moved up to 
executive editor, while Rene Caze- 
nave — one of the best-liked men in 
the business — has gone into the 
No. 2 spot of managing editor. 

One piobblem barring an around- 
the-clock paper for the Hearstlings 
at the present time is lack of plant. 
Neither Examiner or News-Call has 
the facilities or space to print much 
moi-e than their current outpvit. 

It has been done with gieat suc- 
cess in San Jose where the Mer- 
cury and the News roll off the same 
presses each day, sharing the same 
publisher and editor but each with 
its own managing editor. Of course 
this is made a simpler, more lucra- 
tive operation by the fact that San 
Jose's, in effect, a "one-paper" city. 

Well, what will the future hold 
for the Examiner and the News- 
Call? Time and the ingenuity of 
the new Top Team will tell. 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 19B2 Fords 

Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 



ROBERT E. BOULWARE 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

Residential & Commercial 

1 143 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

JO. 7-2211 



TRICOLOR FRENCH RESTAURANT 

Dinner after 4 P.M. 

Closed Monday 

423J GEARY BLVD. BA. 1-8707 



A&B GARMENT DELIVERY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

TOM MAXWELL 
3277 SHAFTER AVENUE-MI 8-7111 



BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

specialists on Wheel Alignment 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-7020 

Bill Barca San Francisco 



HAYES VALLEY AQUARIUM 

Comfilete Line of Tropica] Fn/i 
and £i/ui{i)Tieii( 

327A Hayes Street UN. 3-3483 



PARK HOTEL 

Clean, Reasonable Rates 

1040 FOLSOM ST. 
UN. 1-9397 



Casa Linda Restaurant 

MEXICAN FOOD 
AT ITS BEST 



3854 GEARY BLVD. 
SK. 2-5972 



KRAY AUTO PARTS 

NORB KRAY 

Complete Line of Auto Parts 

Sec Us and Save — MA. 1-3311 

160 - 7th Street 



I'rice Convalescent Hospital 

ni IVnnsylvania Ave, MI. 7-5587 

San Francisco, California 



GOULET REALTY 

1952 OCEAN AVE. 
DE 3-4792 



Ray's Corner Liquor 

In this Corner - RAY DUMPHY 

506 Valencia St. UN. 3-6334 



WALSH REXALL DRUGS 
OWL REXALL DRUGS 

2 Convenient Locations 
MARKET AT 3RD EX 2-5469 

MISSION AT 16TH UN 1-1004 



Moler Barber College 

D. E. BROWN, Mgr. 

Short Course 

Low Tuition— Easy Terms 

161 FOURTH STREET GA 1-9979 

Free Literature 



RAY CICERONE 
REALTY 

Specialising in 
POTRERO PROPERTY 
1542 ■ 20th STREET - VA 4-9146 



Bill's Trucking 

BILL COTTON 
125 BARNEVEID — VA 6-7050 



RACE RADIO Si TV 

Sales & Service 

26 - 29th STREET 

VA 6-1303 



The BUNGALOW FLORIST 

K.'W y PEE 

Specializing in Funeral Design 

Weddings ■ Corsages - Cut Flowers - Plants 

1 188 HILLSIDE BLVD. 
PL 5-3718 COLMA 



Clara Lane Friendship Center 

150 Powell St. San Francisc 



Ivy's Beauty Salon 



18121 2 Eddy St. 



Ideal Sewing Machine Co. 

3006 Mission St. AT 2-8 



RAYMUND Q. WONG 

INSURANCE BROKER 

tire — Liability — Life — Auto 

WESTERN LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

818 CLAY STREET 
Bus: GA 1-3975 



PAT O 'SHEA'S 

3754 GEARY BLVD. 
EV 6-9762 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ACE METALS CO. 

Top Pricers for 

COPPER-BRASS-LEAD 
AUTO GENERATORS & STARTERS 

1429 FAIRFAX VA 6-4545 



Gary's Auto Service 

Touring - AAA Auto Assn. Service 

General Auto Repairs 

3475 CHAMPION ST. 

KE 6-2165 Oakland, Calif. 



Mollerich & Company 

GA 1-4131 
550 MISSION STREET 



CHUN WONG, Inc. 
Frozen Foods 

215 HOWARD STREET ! 
EX 7-2334 



Stevenson Machine Works 

LyIe G. Stevenson 

YU 6-1264 

171 STILLMAN STREET 



L. H. Butcher Co. 

15th ac VERMONT STS. 
MA 1-4210 



THE RECORI 



CITY-COUNTY 



THE BAND PLAYED, SIRENS SHRIEKED, THE CROWD ROARED 
PtKiU.).''^ MUNC,SERVICE STARTED IN SAN FRANCISCO IN 1912 







i 


E' 



RD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




A BOLD EXPERIMENT BECOMES A VITAL SYSTEM 



AUGUST . SEPTEMBER, 1962 



FINAL TALLY FOR RAPID TRANSIT VOTE: 19 TO 2 

Two SAN FRANCISCO Supen'isors who were not present on July 9 
when their colleagues voted unaimously to put the Rapid Transit 
program on the November ballot have announced that they. too. would 
have voted "Aye." 

The two are Supervisor Clarissa Shorthall McMahon and Supervisor 
William C. Blake, it was announced by the Citizens for Rapid 
Transit, the campaigfn organization backing the measure. Proposition 
"A." in all three couuties. 

Addition of these two Supervisors makes the total supervisorial 
vote in all three counties 19 to 2. the Committee pointed out. All five 
Alameda County Supervisors voted Aye. and only in Contra Costa 
County did two Supervisors out of five dissent from submitting Rapid 
Transit to the decision of the voters. 

Since the two Contra Costa dissenters represented less than 30 per 
cent of that county's voters, the results constituted an ovei'whelming 
preliminary endorsement of the Rapid Transit proposal, which will be 
Proposition "A" on all three county ballots, the Citizens for Rapid 
Transit asserted. 



GRANDI ELECTRIC CO. 

Industrial - Commerci.il - Residential Wiring &? Alterations 
3556 Sacramento Street WA 2-2141 

Sanitary Truck Drivers & Helpers 
Loeal 350 

2940 - 16th STREET Fernando Bussi, Secretary-Treasurer 

AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION OF STREET, ELECTRIC RAILWAY 
and MOTOR COACH EMPLOYEES OF AMERICA 

LOCAL DIVISION 1225 

U51 MARKET STREET - ROOM 302 

Telephone KLondike 2-3158 San Francisco, California 

MARINA SEA & SKI 

RENTALS, SALES and REPAIRS 

You arc invited lo visit San Francisco's newest shop, (eatuiing all 

Top Line, in Sailing Clothes. Scuba, Tennis equipment and Water Ski. 

DON CAPPA, Manager 

Open Monday through Saturday — 10-6 

1909 Union Street near Lasuna JOrdan 70838 

Bankamericard 



EL FARO GROCERY 

THE BEST IN DOMESTIC and MEXICAN FOOD and GROCERIES 
2399 Folsom Street San Francisco, California 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 




They're bigger on the inside -but no bigger on the outside! Thinner walls, better 
insulation and modern design allow much more storage space— 50% ore more— 
than models ten years ago. ■ More good news: They need no defrosting! Both 
refrigerator and freezer compartments stay free of frost. 

1 I-E-762 Poci/ic O'as an<i Bet trie dmpoAg 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

174S FOLSOM STREET 
San Francisco 3« California i 

UNderhill 1-14SS 

Stan Seaman 

California Trophy and Engraving Co. 

PRospect 6-6932 

Jewelry — Diamonds — Watches 

299 Ellis Street San Francisco 2, Californii 



PEKluJiCAL "^' 

SEP 2 6 : 



bay "Wind. 




-lARGET — NOVEMBER 6: The hurling: of political lightning will 
. soon be reflected in the public prints as the candidates and their 
mpaigns make ready with the 11th hour moves they hope will achieve 
:tory at the polls. 

Since not all of them will end with gleeful victory faces and state- 
mts — only half will, as a matter of mathematics — it is interesting 

contemplate the sureness of 
ips thus far taken in support of 
contention we've been making 

yeai\ 

Polls of the straw variety are 
inting up the interesting fact 
It Goveinor Brown is several 
rcentage points ahead of Con- 
ider Nixon. And the same polls 
itinue to make another point 
It we've been reiterating here: 
at Mayor Christopher is a little 
ire than several percentage 
ints in front of Lieutenant Gov- 
lor Anderson. 

[t is indeed wonderful to con- 
nplate the excellent chance that 
lifornia may end up with a pair 

San Franciscans in the State third-in-a-row for Campaign Man- 





Edmund G. (Pat) 



pitol. This would no doubt pre- 
it political problems galore — but 
would also mean that Pat and 
orge would have the rarest of 
portunities to make history to- 
cher for California. 

Vnother kind of history will be 
.de November 6 if the many- 
llioned Bay Rrea Rapid Transit 
id issue receives approval in 
1 Francisco, Alameda and Con- 
. Costa Counties. It will be the 



ager Henry Alexander who start- 



ed an amazingly consistent career 
in campaigns by putting over the 
$115,000,000 water bonds last No- 
vember (by the largest majority 
in San Francisco history) and the 
$10,000,000 Airport Garage bonds 
in June. 

And as for Supervisor Dobbs, 
State Senator McAteer and Con- 
gressman Shelley, their campaigns 
are in the natme of warm-ups for 
the Big One in next year's mayor- 
alty. Wonder, as time goes by, will 
Gene and Jack merge ? 

MUNI GOLDEN YEAR: With 
this year San Francisco's hardy 
transit system — the "Muni" — 
winds up its first half-century. 
When it was started back in 1912 
it was the first public-owned sys- 
tem in the country. Ti-ue, it wasn't 
a very large operation in those 
days, with only one line, but it has 
grown very satisfactorily over the 
years into the present huge or- 
ganization. 



The story of the Muni's "(/olden 
years" is told in words and in pic- 
tures in thix issue of City-County 
Record. There's another story in 
plans heiny made for a big celebra- 
tion scheduled to blanket the week 
of October 15. 

The celebration is in the hands 

of a Citizens Committee headed by 

Mrs. Hans Klu.ssmann, whom San 

Francisco fondly knows as its 

( Continued on Page 14 » 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

'be Magazine of Good Government 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

AUGUST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 
'OLUME 29 NUMBER 5 



PETRINI PLAZA 



FALLETTI 

and 

BALDOCCHI 

FINER FOODS 



phone Jordan 7-01)76 



I'lillon and masonic 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




tven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex' 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — ^every year and say, "Therc*s 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares arc surprisingly 
low. 

UDrives, 

LimousitieSf 

Charier Buses 

available 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
Yukon 6-4000 



rCUST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 



The Muni's first Fifty Years of Transit . . 

1912 1962 



THE FLAG was filled out to 48 stars with the admission of New 
Mexico and Arizona to statehood. Woodrow Wilson was elected 
President. War raged in the Balkans — and fashionable ladies of the day 
wore clothes styled after the uniforms of the belligerant armies. Other 
women were marching on state capitols in an effort to gain the right 
to vote. The New Yoik Giants were denying rumors the team was for 
sale and Jack Johnston reigned king of the heavyweight flsticuffers. 
In San Francisco automobile dealers were advertising open-aired 
touring cars for $305 and a steamship line offered a roundtrip to 
Honolulu for $110. The most destructive earthquake and fire in history 
of half a dozen years before was 
all but forgotten; plans were 
rushed for a new City Hall and the 
most exciting topic of conversation 
was the forthcoming Panama Pa- 
cific International Exposition. 
Work on the new municipally- 
owned railway was winding up, 
and many wondered if it would be 
in operation by year's end. 

The year was 1912 and it just 
barely did become the Municipal 
Railway's natal year: At e.xactly 
12:00 o'clock noon on Satui'day, 
December 28, a group of 10 brand- 
new "California - type" streecars 
proudly pulled out of the carbarn 
at Geary and Presidio and headed 
east down Geary Street. 

At the confluence of Kearny, 
Geary and Market Streets a small 

ceremony had been planned for 'ng all right first and toot our 
12:30. Mayor "Sunny Jim" Rolph horn afterward," was the way he 
had been deliberate in insisting put it. 

that the inauguration of Muni serv- But the Mayor failed to foresee 
ice be scaled down, rather than the citizenry enthusiasm that long 
blown up. "Let's get the cars go- before the appointed time had 




Colorful James Rolph, Jr. 
27th Mayor of S.F. (I9I2-I93I) 



CHESTER'S AUTO REPAIR 

TUNE-UPS MOTOR REBUILDING 

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 

BRAKE SERVICE 

629 Gough St. WAInut 1-5355 San Francisco, Calif. 

ORENGO'S RESTAURANT 

ONE LAKESHORE PLAZA 

(SLOAT BLVD. at 34th AVE.) 
San Francisco 27 SE 1-7374 

MOBILE RADIO ENGINEERS 

"FLEET COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS" 
1150 Larkin St. 1415 Bush St. 

GR 4-6321 HI 4-0941 

San Francisco 9 Oakland 12 



overflowed to such an extent that 
an expectant throng estimated at 
50,000 had filled the five-pronged 
intersection, effectively bringing all 
traffic movements to a stop by 
noon on that great day. And when 
he boarded the first car, deposited 
one of the first 40 nickels produced 
by the San Francisco Mint, and 
took over the controls, happy bed- 
lam broke loose : The crowd roared, 
the siren on the roof of the St. 
Francis Hotel shrieked, the musi- 
cians of the Municipal Band 
Band strained to bring music into 
the din. Souvenir hunters laid coins 
on the tracks to be flattened by the 
weight of the car into collector's 
items; others jostled wildly in an 
effort to become "first" riders of 
the Muni. 

It was a history-making event, 
for this bold experiment which San 
Francisco had undertaken was the 
first public-owned transit system 
in the United States. During the 
gala chaos of the occasion. Mayor 
Rolph declared, "It must prove a 
success!" Then he added, propheti 
cally, "I want everyone to feel that 
it is but the nucleus of a mighty 



system of streetcar lines whi 
will some day encompass this e 

tire city." 

One newspaper was moved 
enthusiastic floridity; "San Fra 
Cisco's Municipal Railway spra: 
into action yesterday, cutting wi 
its pioneer wheels an indelil 
track across the page of hi 
tory. . . " 

The day was also a financial st 
cess as 15,000 people rode the ra 
during the Muni's first 12 hours 
operation, paying $750 in fan 
"Owl" service was also inaugu 
ated, with service running eve 
hour. 

Thus a 23-year dream became 
concrete fact. A number of pr 
vious attempts at a public tram 
system had been unsuccessful 
made. Various bond issues hi 
been placed before the people — 1 
to be defeated by slim margir 
The old City Charter adopted 
1900 declared for ultimate muni( 
pal ownership for all public uti 
ties, but it was not until 1909 th 
a $2,000,000 bond issue was vot€ 
This was followed by track i 



SHIPOWNERS & MERCHANTS TOWBOAT CO., LTD. 
RED STACK LINE 

Olc;!!!, Hiirbcir &? Coastwise Towiny 
Salv:i,i;c Service 



Pier 25 



DO. 2-3474 



San Francisco 



THE RECOr 



Loval of the privately - owned 
eary Street cable line and the 
art of construction of the Muni. 
The Panama Pacific Intcrna- 
onal Exposition was given next 
riority in the inauguration of new 
nes. In 1913 the city acquired the 
nion Street line. The following 
;ar the Stockton "F" and the Van 
ess "H" lines were built. By the 
me the Exposition opened in 1915, 
lere were six lines providing serv- 
e to it as well as to the residen- 
il areas of Cow Hollow and North 
;ach. Service was established on 
,e "C" and "J" lines in 1917, 

Fully one-third of the city's area 
y unpopulated in 1912. That 
me year test borings were being 
ade for the construction of an 
,920 -foot tunnel under Twin 
laks. Six years later — on Sun- 
y. February 3, 1918 — the first 
;" car passed through the longest 
reelcar tunnel in the world. It 
IS a significant transit "break- 
rough," bringing service as far 
!st as St, Francis Circle to the 
edeveloped West-of-Twin Peaks 
ea. Later this service extended 
form the "K" and "L" lines to 
5et increasing transit needs of 
e growing districts. The "M" 
le was started in 1925. 

The Sunset District — where the 
nd dimes were gradually surren- 
ring to the marching rows of 
mes — was next to reap the 
nefits of public transportation. 
1 Sunday, October 21, 1928, serv- 
! on the "N" line started. The 
casion was another San Fran- 
ico "gala," with thousands lining 
iboce Avenue from Market to 
e tunnel and the Ferry Building 




In 1918 Ihe growing Muni introduced its first go 
crossed Golden Gate Pork 



siren emitting undulating shrieks 
of joy as the first streetcar headed 
west to the Sunset, the indefati- 
gable Mayor Rolph again at the 
controls. Like the other day back 
in December, 1912, this first day of 
"N" opei'ation was a financial suc- 
cess, earning $695. 

While the "N" service marked 
the conclusion of construction of 
major streetcar lines by the Muni, 
the same period of streetcar ex- 
pansion had seen the pioneering 
use of gasoline buses. These were 
used to interlace the city with 
crosstown lines to supplement the 
main streetcar lines which were 
bringing thousands of passengers 
daily from the newlv-created Sun- 



gs 


CI 


!ude Berhouet and Claudinc Bcrhouct, Props. 

Hotel de France 


Ki < ' 




BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 


w:im. 




780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 




Telephone GA 1-6410 



set and Parkside districts to the 
busy arteries of downtown San 
Francisco, 

The No. 1 bus line, crossing 
Golden Gate Park, was established 
in 1918, Later, as the value of the 
motor coach in providing a system 
of flexible transportation was real- 
ized, this line was extended over 
10th Avenue and Fulton, Golden 
Gate Park, 9th Avenue, Irving and 
7th Avenue to Forest Hill Station, 
Here it connected with the No, 3 
bus line established in 1926 to serve 
the St, Francis Woods and West- 
wood Park Areas, Another bus 
line was established along the Em- 
barcadero from the foot of Hyde 

(Continued on Page 10 1 



AIR FRANCE 



The World's Largest Airline 



260 STOCKTON ST. 

Tickets and Reservations 

Call YUkon 2-7150 

THE HONGKONG 
AND SHANGHAI 

BANKING 
CORPORATION 
OF CALIFORNIA 

A Subsidiary of The Hongkong Bank 
Group which hos more than 140 
offices throughout the world . . . 

Total assets $1,250,000,000 

80 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO i. CALIF. 

Sweetheart Hams and Bacon 
«Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

BURLINGAME, California 



JGUST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Wliv All-Number Calling? 



Ltt.1t month uc ii.\ke<l the Paci/ir Telephone Co. u'hy it is 
tienxsaiy to hare All-diiiit dialinii. Thi.i i.s the an.iwer we re- 
t lived. Wc are plea.ied to run it a.s a piihlie st-nice. The Editor. 



The growth of the country, and 
resulting swift rise in demand for 
telephon sen-ice. produce the need 
for All-Number Calling. 

Twenty years ago there were 
fewer than 23 million telephones in 
the United States. Today there are 
about 77 million. By 1975 it is ex- 
pected there will be more than 160 
million. 

Under the old two-letter, five- 
digit numbeiing system, we would 
soon begin running out of prefixes. 
That would leave us unable to 
carry out our basic social and eco- 
nomic function — providing Amer- 
ica with the best telephone sei-vice 
in the world, promptly, when and 
where it's wanted. 

All-Number Calling is not. funda- 
mentally a matter of dialing meth- 
ods or personal preferences, al- 
though these were carefully stuu- 
ied. The fundamental reason for 
ANC is to enable us to go on serv- 
ing a growing country. 

ANC was fully researched before 
it was introduced. Telephone scien- 
tists gave the problem of the di- 
minishing supply of phone numbeis 
long, intensive study. ANC was 
the most practical way to enlarge 
our supply of phone numbers while 
causing customers the least pos- 
sible inconvenience. 



It is accepted and working today 
in at least parts of most major 
cities in the United States. There 
are 18 million total telephones w 'th 
ANC. And in 37 other countiies 
around the world . more than 36 
million telephones have all numer- 
als. In addition, Canada is convert- 
ing to ANC. 

Some have raised questions re- 
garding the memory aspects of 
All-Number Calling. Research on 
this was begun by Bell Telephone 
Laboratories back in 1954. It in- 
cluded both laboratory and field 
trials. 

Telephone scientists conducting 
the study came to this conclusion: 

From a customer's standpoint. 
ANC is definitely workable. 

The study indicated that for 
most people seven numbers were 
about as easy to remember for a 
short period of time I the time be- 
tween looking up a number in the 
directory and dialing it i as a series 
of two letters and five numbers. It 
does take longer to commit a series 
of seven numbers to long-term 
memory, but our experience has 
been that most people memorize 
only a few numbers permanently. 
(Continued on Page 11) 



M 


cGuire 


and Hest 


er 




GENERAL 


CONTRACTORS 

• 






796 -66th Avenue 






Telephone 


Neptune 2-7676 






Oakland 


21, Calfiornia 





(;eor(;e w. ri:i:d & co. 

MASONRY CONTRACTORS 

464 Clementina Street YU 2-4846 

SAN FRANCISCO 

BARRY, O'NEILL & DIERCKS 

Insurance Brokers 

256 MONTGOMERY STREET DO 2-2663 

San Francisco, California 

GREETINGS FROM 

Cooks, Pastry Cooks & Assistants 

Local 44 

JOE BELARDI, PrtesidenI 

WILLIAM K. KILPATRICK, General Secrelary 

OR 3-9073 

827 Hyde Street, San Francisco 9, California 

MARCONI BRAND 

SWISS AMERICAN SAUSAGE CO. 

35 Williams Avenue VAlencia 6-5400 

San Francisco 29, California 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY 

General Office: CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

MOTOR TRUCKS 

Address Reply to: BRANCH SALES OFFICE 

610 Brannan Street — San Francisco 7, California 



CINCOTTA BROTHERS 

Distributors 

-:- Marine Hardware -:- 
-:- Fisheries Supplies -:- 

169 JEFFERSON STREET 
San Francisco 11, Calif. 

Telephone PRospect 5-8977 

Bnuuh MONTEREY, CALIF. 



THE RECORi 



Around and About 



By WHIT HENRY 



[ere is a letter 1 have received 
nt the beautifying of San Fran- 
» that may present a different 
eet on the subject: 

Dear Whit: Prior to the 1939 
)osition I was asked to contrib- 

to the planting: of trees in the 
;k where I live so as to make 
, Francisco more attractive to 

expected visitors to the fair. I 
so and felt justly provid of the 
lit. Now I am well past the 60 
r mark and am no longer able 
nount a ladder and trim the tree 
ch is getting too big; also, the 
;s are spreading and soon the 
walk will need repairing. Theie 
ilso the danger that the roots 

get into the sewer. I called the 

hall for help but they can do 
ling; I have been informed that 
I are responsible only for the 
IS that they themselves plant. 
V I reggret that I planted a tree 
le 20 years ago. I hope that dur- 

the past years it has given 
isure to some people, but to me, 
the present time, it is only a 
dache." 
nd that's that! 




The stern wheel boats that u.sed 
to ply from San Francisco up the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin Riv- 
ers have long since departed from 
the local scene; however, in Wi- 
nona, Minnesota there is presei'ved 
for posterity, one of the many 
ships that dotted all the navigable 
rivers of America before the days 
of the automobile. The following is 
from a brochure given to all who 
pay a visit to this unique exhibit: 

We welcome you most cordially 
to Winona and invite you to visit 
our old paddle-wheeler, the Steam- 
er "Julius C. Wilkie." We hope you 
enjoy every minute of your stay 
here, 

The Steamer "Wilkie" is the 
property of the Winona County 
Historical Society. It is enshrined 
in Levee Park at the foot of Main 
Street. It was built in Rock Island, 

(Continued on Page 12) 



ABBOT A. HANKS, Inc. 

Established 1866 

Engineers - Chemists - Assayers 

1300 SANSOME STREET 
San Francisco 



Inspection - Tests ■ Control 

Structural Materials 

Tests and Investigations 

Foundation Soils 

Assay and Chemical 

EXbrook 7-2464 



CENTRAL ELECTRIC 
COMPANY, INC. 

COUNTIES of SAN FRANCISCO, 

SAN IHATEO and SANTA CLARA 

^^^^ 

INDUSTRIAL and COMMERCIAL WIRING 

STREET LIGHTING and 

UNDERGROUND INSTALLATIONS 

TOWER and POLE LINE CONSTRUCTION 

FIFTY - FIVE YEARS OF SERVICE 



M and M Express & Nisei Movers 



Careiul ■ Competent Ser 
George Taragawa 
116 DOWNEY STREET 



Sacred Heart High School 

Fall Term — September 4, 1962 
1075 Ellis Street GR 4-1180 

THE BUNGALOW FLORIST 

KAY AND DEE 

Specialists in Funeral Designs 

Weddings - Corsages - Cut Flowers 

PLANTS 

1188 Hilside Blvd. PL 5-3718 

COLMA 

(Insist on the best) 

Superior Driving School 

Being a SUPERIOR DRIVER is the 

BEST INSUR.\NCE you can buy! 

U22 Noriega Street LO 6-6800 

Sutter Furniture Manufacturing Co. 

Custom Furniture Wholesale Only 

REGINALD R. SUTTER 

275 Capp Street MAl-5447 

SAN FRANCISCO 10 



;UST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Hall MA 1-01 63 

GeorKc Christopher, Mayor 

John n. Sullivan. Executive Secretary 
nnliert M. Smalley. Confldentlal Secretary 
Marcaret Smith. Personal Secretary 
.lohn I>. Mootz, Administrative Assistant 
Uoberl Rockwell. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

2S5 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Peter Tamaras. President. 1020 Harri.son 
William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 
UoE.r Boas. 2;!2.'! Geary St. 
.loseph M. Casev. 2528 Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Dobb.s, S.'il California St. 
r>r. Charles A. Rrtola. 2.')3 Columbus Ave. 
.lohn .1. Ferdon. 155 Montgomery St. 
.lames T<. Hallev. 870 Market St. 
Clarl.ssa Shortall McMahon. TO.? Market St. 
.Tack Morrison. 2.''iOO C.reenwioh St. 
.loserh E. Tinney. 2.117 Mission St. 

Robert .T. riolnn. Clerk 

I.llllan M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 

Commercial & Industrial Development — Boas. Blake. 
Casey 

County. State and National Affairs — Perdon, Dobbs. 
McMahon 

Education, Parks and Recreation — Ertola. Blake. 
Casey 

Finance, Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs, Perdon. 
Halley 

Judiciary. Liegislative and Civil Service — Tinney, 
McMahon, Morrison 

Police — Casey, Ertola, Tinney 

Public Buildings, L<ands and City Planning — Mor- 
rison. Boas, Tinney 

Public Health and Welfare— McMahon, Halley, Mor- 
rison 



Dobbs, Ertola 



ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall 
Itusscll L,. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

2iifi Cilv Hail 
Tbonia.s M. O'Connor 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

xxn Hryant St. 
Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDICR 

R.io Bryant St. 
Edward T. Mancusj 

SHERIFF 

S.',! City Hall 
Matthew C. Carbeny 
TREASURER 

111) City Hall 
John J. Uoodvvin 



HK 1-1.322 



HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor, City Hall UN 1-8552 

Uajniond J. Arata Francis McCarty 

Carl H. Allen Edward Molkenbuhr 

Byron Arnold Clarence W. Morris 

John W. Bussey Harry J. Neubarth 

Walter Carpeneti Raymond J. O'Connor 

C. Harold Caulfield Edward F. O'Day 

Melvyn I. Cronin Charles S. Peery 

Norman Elkington George W. Schonfeld 

Timothy I. Fitzpalrlck William F. Traverse 

Joseph Karesh Ahin E. Weinberger 

Gerald S. l.#vin H. A. van der Zee 

Joseph M. Cummins, Secretary 

<80 City Hall UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall KL, 2-3008 

Andrew J. Eyman, Presiding Leland J. Lazaxus 

Albert A. Axelrod Clarence A. Unn 

Emmet Daly George E. Maloney 

Robert J. Drcwe.s William A. O'Hrlen 

Bernard B. Gllckfeld LenoreD. Underwood 

Clayton W. Horn James J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-3008 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. MAYOR 

AuK\ist 1. 1(102 

TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

S.-iO Bryant St. KL 2-.'iOOS 

James Leddy. Cbl.f Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-R552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
William McDonnell. Foreman 
Dr. Donald Schulz. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

SSO Br.vant St. KL .'1-0111 

,Tohn D. Kavanaugh, chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick 'Vaushan, Chairman, 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 6S1 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly, 399 Fremont St. 
William Moskovitz. 5030 Gearv Blvd. 
Robert A. Peabody. 456 Post St, 
Adolph L. Plerotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5740 

Thomas F. Strycula, 

Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 

JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N, Buell, Chairman, 445 Bush St. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St, 
Rev. John A. Collins, 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Jack Goldberger, 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
Rev. James B. Flynn, 1825 Mission 
Rev. Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
Miss Myra Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2S9 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean 

940 - 26th St. N.W.. Washington. D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator, Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkln HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley, M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico. 2770 'Vallejo St. 

Nell Sinton. 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagopian. 220 Bush St. 

Mark Harris, 1600 Hoiioway 

Betty Jackson, 2835 Vailejo St. 

Wlliiam E. Knuth. 1600 Hoiioway Ave. 

Joseph Esherlck, 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de "Voung Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 l>arkin St. HE 1 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 

Gardner W. Mein, Prcs., 315 MontKomery St. 

Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St, 

James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 

Mrs. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 

George Thomas Rockrise. 405 Sansome St. 

Alvin H. Baum, Jr.. 14 Montgomery St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller, Secretary 



HE 1-2 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hail 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Hubert J. Sober, President, 1.55 Montgomery St. 
Richard C. Ham, Vice Pres., 200 Bush St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick, 827 Hyde St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 

DISASTER CORPS 

850 Bryant St. KL. 3-1' 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.). Director 
Alex X. McCausland. Public Information Oflficer 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-4 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M., 
170 Fell St. 

Samuel Ladar. President. Ill Sutter St, 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper. Jr., 10 Walnut St. 
Adolfo de Urioste, 612 Van Ness Ave. 
Edward Kemmitt. 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Claire Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 
James E. Stratten. 800 Presidio Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt, of Schools and Sec 



FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN l-8i 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

Dr. Peter Angel, President, 1867 - 15th Ave. 

Charles R. Greenstone. 182 Second St. 

Philip Dindia, 536 Bryant St. 

William F. Murray. Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes, Chief, Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1-2 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook, President, 220 Montgomery St 
George W. Cunifte, 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell, M.D., 977 Valencia St. 
Frank J. Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave. 
Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 



Director 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3-61 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jacob Shemano, Chairman, 130 Monlgomerv St. 
John E. Gurich, 300 Montgomery St, 
Solomon E. Johnson, 704 Market St, 
Charles J. Jung. 622 Washington St. 
Ji'seph P. Mazzola. 1621 Market St. 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. UK 1-2 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 

John E. Sullivan, Chairman, 69 West Portal 
Arthur S. Becker, 3475 California St. 
Donald Magnln, 77 O'Farrell St. 
G, Baltzer Peterson, 2910 Vailejo St. 
David Thomson. 65 Berry St, 

Vlnlng T. Fisher, General Manager 

Thomas J, O'TooIe, Secretary 



THE RECOl 



sBMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 



Max Monre. President 
lllinm H. H. Dnvis. :lS4 KoImomi SI. 
■org.' Olllln. 4091 - I9th Ave. 
arence J. Walsh. 2450 - 17th St. 
meat I.. West. 265 MontKomery St. 
J. lOdwIn Mattox. Kxeoullve Serretar.v 

>LICE COMMISSION 

8S0 Hryant Street KL :i-lliG7 

Meets every Monday at 6:00 P.M. 
LUl A. Hi.ssinKer. President, 415 Sansoine St. 
iroUl li. MiKlniion, 255 California SI. 
in Kazaekerley. STA Howard St. 

Thomas J. Cahlll, Chief of Poll.e 
Alfred J. Nelder, Deputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas Zarasoza. Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel P. McKlem. Chief of Inspectors 
L»t. Wm. J. O'Brien, Commission Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler. Department Secretary 



JBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 



nth 1 



HE 1-2121 
;):30 P.M. 



lomas W. S. Wu. D.D.S.. President 
hn M. Bransten, 665 - 3rd St. 
. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 
ise M Kanucchl. 1445 Stockton St. 
jrtlnier Flelshhacker. Jr.. 601 California St. 
irKarel V. Olrdner. 2130 Fulton St. 
Iward B. Heavey. 68 Post St. 
Ilton K. Lepetlch, 1655 Polk Street 
rs. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 
William Turner, 1642 Broderlck St. 



I..^ 



vur 



990 I 



SI. 



jBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 
287 City Hall HE 1 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

uart N. Oreenberg. President, 765 Folsom St. 

ft Simon, 1350 Folsom St. 

orge F. Hansen. 215 Market St. 

lomas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 

omas F. Stack. 703 Market St. 
Robert C. Klrkwood, Manager of UtlUtle 



Jan 



; J. Finn, Secretary to Comn 



sion 



Bureaus and Departments 

counts, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

George Negri. Director 
rport, San Francisco International, S. F. 28 

Belford Brown. Manager PL, 6-050n 

tch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-70O0 

Oral L.. Moore, Gen. Mgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 

inlcipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
rsonnel i Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning, Director 
blic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
iter Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner, General Manager 

IBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
585 Bush St. EX 7-6000 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday each month 
at 9 A.M. 

ink H. Slos.s. President. 351 California St. 
. Xavier Barrios. 2326 Ocean Ave. 
s. Margaret R. Murray, 1306 Portola Drive 
miam P. Scott, Jr.. 249 Natoma St. 
:queline Smith, 2015 Steiner St. 

Ronald H. Born. Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Eulala Smith, Secretary 

XREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLaren Lodge. Golden Gate Park SK 1-4866 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 

liter A. Haas. Sr.. President. 98 Battery St. 

ter Bercut. 1333 Jones St. 

iry Margaret Casey, 532 Mission St. 

iUlam M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

, Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

s. Joseph J. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 

an F. Conway. Jr.. 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Klmbell, General Manager 
Paul N. Moore. Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gate Ave. UN 3-7750 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
F.vorett Griffin, Chairman, 465 California St. 
James R. Black. Jr.. 120 Montgomerv St. 
James A. Folger. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 836 Market St. 
I^wrence R. Palaclos. 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman, Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

451) .MiAlllslei- SI. HE 1-2121 

M. els ever.v Wcliiesday at 2 P.M. 
Martin K. Woriimth. President. 4109 Pachcco 
James M. Crane, 333 Moiitconiery St. 
James M. Hamlll. 120 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Dlez, 2251 - 36th Ave. 
William T. Ueed, 2151 - 18th Ave. 

Ex-Of(icio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce. Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans BulldinK MA 1-6600 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Frederic Campagnoll. President. 300 Montgomery 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Frank A. Flynn, 1549 Noriega St. 
Prentls C. Hale. Jr., 867 Market St. 
George T. Davis. Ill Sutter St. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson. 19 Maywood Drive 
Wilson Meyer. 333 MontRomery St. 
Guldo J. Musto. 636 North Point 
Samuel D. Sayad. 36 Aptos Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 306 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 

B. Lawrence George, Secretary 



SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building 
George Culler, Director 



HK 1-2(140 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Raymond L. Bozzlnl. Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 

Frank J. O'Connell, Market Master MI 7-9423 

CORONER 

850 Bryant St. KL 3-1694 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Dovle U Smith, Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-8000, Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk- Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin Mongan. 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Rcflistrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 167 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

L,. J. LeGuennec, 160 Otis 

HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HBmlock 1-2121, Ext. 704 
Harrv I. Bigarani. 1384 York St. 
LJoyd Conrich. 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnin, Stockton & O'Farrell 
Frank E. Oman, 557 - 4th St. 

Bernard A. Cummings. Secretary, 254 City Hall 

Bx-Officio Members; 

James R. McCarthy. Director of City Planning 

Irwin J. Mu.ssen. Urban Renewal Co-ordlnator 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox, Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns. Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou. Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

Iviuis A. Moran. Superintendent MO 4-1580 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. B. Altaers. Superintendent MI 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake, Adm. Superintendent HE 1-2800 
PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 
R. Brooks I.iarter, 

Assistant Director. Administrative 
S. Myron Tatarlan 

Asst. Director. Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 
Accounts, 260 City Hall UK 1-2121 

J. J. McCIoskey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 265 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 450 McAllister St. HE 1-2121 

Robert (?. I.,evy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army HE 1-2121 

.\ H. lOkenherg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 450 McAllister St. HE 1-2121 

Sidney Franklin. Supervisor 
Egineering, 359 City Hall HE 1-2121 

I'liffcrd J. Geertz. Cltv Engineer 
Sewer Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army St. 

Walter H. Jones. Superintendent HE 1-2121 

Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. HE 1-2121 

Bernard M. Crotty. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. HE 1-2121 

1*'. 1>. Brown. Superintendent 
Urban Renewal. 450 McAllister St. HB 1-2121 

Bernard A. CummlnKS. Analyst 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Ben Henas. Purchaser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harrison Sts. 

J. 10. l.earv. Supervisor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 50 

George Stanley. Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 McAllister St. HE 1-2121 

Philip I,, Rezns. Director of Properly 
James T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr^ 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS A MEASURES 

6 City Hall HE 1-2121 

O. C. Skinner. Jr. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 

THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday, Jan., April, June, Oct. 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. Honorary President, 
2 Pine St. 

Alexander de Bretteville. Honorary Member. 2000 
Washington St. 

Mrs. C. Tobin Clark, House on Hill, San Mateo 

William W. Mein, Honorary Member, 315 Montgom- 
ery St. 

Mrs. Alexander Albert, 2320 L-vons St. 

Joseph M. Bransten, 665 - Si'd St. 

Walter E. Buck, President, 235 Montgomery St. 

E. Raymond Armsby, 111 Sutter St. 

Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 

Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 

Mrs. Bruce Kelham, 15 Arguello Blvd. 

Charles Mayer, San Francisco Examiner 

David Pleydell-Bouverle, Glen Ellen, Calif. 

John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 

William R. Wallace, Jr.. 100 Bush St. 

Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 

Harold L. Zellerbach. 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation & Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe. Jr.. Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas, Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. April, June, Oct., 2.30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. George Cameron. Honorary President. 
Hillsborough 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Miss Louise A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

Sheldon O. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

Charles de Young Thierlot, 1802 Floribunda, Hills- 
borough 

R. Gwln Follls, 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Helmbucher. 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garrett McEnerney. II. 444 California St. 

Roscoe F. (lakes. 220 Bush St. 

Joseph O. Tobln, 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burllngame Country Club 

Charles Page, 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Filoll. San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation & Park Commission 
Richard Rheem. Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalplne. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

4:',6 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Robert J. E\erson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. MA 1-1700 

Charles W. Frledrlchs, Executive Secretary 



;GUST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 



MUNI RAILWAY 

(Continued from Page 5i 

Street to the Southern Paiific 
Depot. 

By 1928. while the movies were 
advertising "talkies" and the Stock 
Market was unaware of the ap- 
proaching year of the crash, the 
Muni had grown to a system of 
1300 emplopees and 215 vehicles 
which were carrying 240,000 pas- 
sengers daily. 



In 1941 the Muni established its 
first trolley coach line, the "R." 
running on Howard Street and 
South Van Ness Avenue from 
Beale to Army. World War II in- 
terrupted plans for further con- 
version to trolley coach operations. 

Throughout the first 32 years of 
its existence, the Muni operated in 
competition with various othei' 
transit systems. Before the turn 
of the century, in 1893. a number 

(Continued on Page 151 




The imie "balloon" horse car ran on Sutter Street. The body of the ■bolloon" 
car was mounted on a pivot that enobled it to be turned around ot the end 
of the line without unhitching the horses. The year 1871. 



TITLE INSURANCE & TRUST CO. 


(L-.^ 


148 Montgomery St. SU 1-3500 


San Francisco 


Artcraft Neon Co. 


2230 Third Street MA. 1-8262 


San Francisco 


Ba>k<lb.ll, B.i5eball, Foolb.ill. Sohb»ll, GoK. Ir.ick, Tenni,, Bowlin,; 


ttniformj. Trophies & Mcddls, Ski Rent,-ils, Hunting, Fishing 


FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 


1404 TARAVAL STREET S.,n FnitHi.fo 16. C;,li(. MOnlro.e M909 



Have you tried . . . 

The Delicious Buffet 

at the 

Whilconib Hotel 



served fnim \\:M) to 2:n() P.M.. Monday through Friday, 
in the dcht;httul Vienna Tavern — all you wish to eat . . . 

$1.50 incl. tax 

If you ,ire planning a banquet or a dance, stop by the 
Whiteomb and let a member of the staff show you the 
Vista Room, Crystal Ballroom or one of the many smaller 
banquet rooms ready for your use. 

For overnight guests, newly decorated rooms, many with 
television, provide comfortable accommodations con- 
venient to the San Francisco City Hall plus the ease of 
free parking. 




WHITCOMB HOTEL 

MARKET at NINTH 
UNderhill 1-9600 



Mme. J. G. DUPORT 

MODEL FRENCH LAUNDRY 

1861 UNION STREET 

Phone WEst 1-5984 San Francisco 9, Californi; 



REAL ESTATE 



INSURANCE 



FRANK Bldg. & Land Corp. 

F. E. FRANK and F. C. FRANK, Conlraclor 

TWX-SF 1174 

1500 GENEVA AVENUE - SAN FRANCISCO 24 - DE. 3-1230 



North Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Nenesl Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational Viev 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-2928 

Reasonable Rates — Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 

Tliomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
Lombard 4-0180 



THE RECORI 



DIGIT-DIALING 

(Continued from Page 6) 
idividual memories vary great- 
of couise. Some people remem- 

numbcrs easily, but can't re- 
nber names or faces. Others 

remember faces but not names 
lumbers. 

eople remember numbers more 
ily when they are broken into 
ill groups. This is why we di- 
! ANC numbers into groups of 
je and four 223-4567 rather 
n 22-34567 or just 2234567. 
he studies also covered other 
ects of usage: speed of dialing, 
uracy of dialing, etc. With 
se factors, as with memory, the 
elusion was the same. ANC is a 
■kable system. 

he objective was to develop a 
ing system which would meet 

growth needs of the United 
tes and at the same time pro- 
t the least inconvenience to most 
phone customers. Again, the 
wer was ANC. However, this 
wer was not determined until a 
iber of alternatives were con- 
ired. Among them were: 
.dd an extra pull of the dial 
Jier by using 3 letters plus 5 
(ibers; 2 letters plus 6 numbers 
adding a letter to the end of 
sent numbers I : This is incon- 
ient from the customer's point 
view because it forces him to 
ke an extra dial pull on every 

Ihange the dial to put letters in 
10 holes: This would mean 
'sically changing some 77 mil- 
i telephone dials across the 
ntry. All telephones would havo 
be converted before any new 
fixes would be available. Such a 
erne would be economically pro- 
itive. 

flange to a system of three let- 
3, plus four numerals (GAR 



irst Presbyterian Church 

Rererend E. W. Rimley 

Van Ness at Sacramento St. 
PR 6-5552 



KAY'S CLUB 

529 Valencia Street 



Al Graf Bail Bond 



Greek American Club 

161 Eddy Street 



Stynamite Co. 



9000 instead of GA 1-90001: This 
would give us even fewer combin- 
ations than we have under the 
present system. 

Leave present numbers as they 
are and use ANC numbers for new 
customers after we ran out: This 
would leave our customers with a 
permanently mixed system of num- 
bers. We know from experience 
that customers tend to find this 
confusing. 

Thus, none of the alternatives 
was found to be as workable as 
ANC. They either did not meet our 
need for more numbers or were not 
technically feasible. 

No matter how you dissect ANC, 
you always get back to the funda- 
mental reason for it: Growth. 

There is one other possible way 
to meet the need for growth. Th;it 
is to increase the number of Num- 
bering Plan Areas in the United 
States. These areas were created 
as a necessary part of the plan tor 
Direct Distance Dialing, and enablj 
us to use the same prefix in differ- 
ent parts of the country. With this 
plan, when you dial a call outside 
.your "home" area, you dial the 3- 
digit "Area Code" of the locality 
you want to reach before dialing 
your number. 

But every time we devide i call- 
ing area we increase 'the number 
of calls on which a customer must 
make three extra dial pulls. ANC, 
with its extra prefix supply, allows 
customers to reach a larger num- 
ber of phones with a minimum 
number of dial pulls. In other 
words, the customer's "home" area 
— in which he does not have to dial 
an Area Code — can be considerably 
larger with ANC than would other- 
wise be possible. 

In the future, there probably will 
be some area codes needed across 
the country. But with ANC, these 
can be kept to a minimum, thus 
keeping dialing as convenient for 
our customers as possible. 



Neda's Flower & Gift Shop 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 1963 Fords 

Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 

RACE RADIO 8c TV 

Salcf 6" Service 

26 ■ 29lh STREET 
VA 6-1303 



JEANETTE'S BEAUTY SALON 

I nMI'l.i;Ti; IIK.MITY StKVICK 

2-'0I Judnh Si. 

MO J-OHi) 



WANTED 
TEEN-AGERS!! 

that want to be leaders . . . with 
their group . . . GRIMME 
SCHOOL OF FASHION, EX 2- 
9175 . . . now forming SUMMER 
SESSIONS . . . just for YOU! 

Gain "Self-Confidence and Poise 
while learning the art of Hair- 
styling . . . Wardrobe . . . Pos- 
ture and Make-up" . . . 

You'll be in ihe know with 

Grimme 

SCHOOL or FASHION 



41 Grant Ave. 



EX 2-9175 



Classes for adults alsi 



BILL'S Automatic 
Transmission Service 

Expert Service on All Makes and Models 

Wm, (Bill) Burraec Owner 

4050 - 24th St. VA 6-1949 



BILL NOTTER'S GARAGE 

specialists on Wheel Alignment 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-7020 

Bill Barca San Francisco 



San Francisco Meat Co. 

Finest (Quality Fresh Meals 
Also, We Specialize in Veal 



WHOLESALE and RETAIL 
HUGO FAMBRINI 

1310 GRANT AVENUE 
DO. 2-8480 



Busineis: PRospect 5-4365 
Home: GRayslonc 4-0717 

A-1 Refrigeration Sales I Service 

Commercial and Domestic 

1465 HYDE 

San Francisco, Calif. 

R. W. MOON, Service Engineer 
Refrigeration t Washer Rental Service 



CHAS. J. GRISEZ CO. 



Deak & Co. 
of California, Inc. 

Foreign Exchange Specialists 
349 Sutter St. DO 2-3452 



RESIDENCE CLUB 

1500 Sutter St. PR 6-1860 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Louis A. Barherini 
CONTRACTOR 

1654 Sanchez St. MI 8-0684 
SAN FRANCISCO 



UNIVERSAL MERCHANOISE CO. 



744 Mission St., near 3rd St. 
EXbrook 7-541} 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Schmitt Plumbing & Heating 

AIR CONDITIONING 
••Li-t Cc.irue Do It" 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 
Instruments for Hnnd Surgery 
Active Hand SC Finger Splints 

70 -t 2th STREET 
MA 1-6876 



Mission 8-9938 

THE 
CHEROKEE 

Sam • Tony • Terry 

45? CORTLAND AVE. 
San Francisco 



IGUST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 7 J 

111., in 1898. The hull of this boat 
is of fir. and the stem or keel is of 
white oak. To the best of our 
knowledge, this is the only wood- 
hull steamboat in this area that 
has been preserved as a monument 
and a museum. 

The Steamer "Wilkie" is a sym- 
bol of a glorious era that is now 
past on the Mississippi River. It is 
a visual part of the history of the 
enormous traffic that occurred 
there in the past century. With it 
all, even young children can see 
the progress made in boat build- 
ing in the past few yeais. Its horse 
power is 200. while modem diesel 
towboats develop up to 10.000 H.P. 

Please take a look at the bluffs 
over in Wisconsin. They have 
changed vei-y little since Father 
Hennepin came up this river with 
one white companion, as prisoners 
of a band of Sioux Indians in 1682. 
They were the first white men to 
pass here on the river. Winona was 
just a nandbar then. We would give 
a great deal to see one of the ca- 
noes that was used by the Indians 
at that time. Our descendants. 100 
years hence, will be able to see this 
boat tht was used 160 years before 
their times. Briefly, that is the 
why of this steamboat being here. 
It is living history. 

The first steamboat that was 
floated on the Mississippi River 
was the "New Orleans" in 1811. It 
was built on the Upper Ohio and 
went to New Orleans. It did not 
have enough power to return up 
the river father than Natchez, 
Miss., where the cuiTent became 
too strong. Consequently, it was 
used only between New Orleans 



and Natchez until it was destroyed 
in an accident. 

The next boat was the "Enter- 
prise." built in 1815. It had power 
to stem the current farther up the 
river. It was not, however, until 
1823 that the Steamer "Virginia" 
passed here on the way to Ft. Snel- 
ling. Pievious to 1823, it had taken 
about 6 weeks to go from St. Louis 
to Ft. Snelling, but by steamboat 
it took only 20 days. From that 
time on. myriads of boats were 
built and used on the river. 

The early steamboats were haz- 
ardous affairs with poor, weak en- 
gines, and pooiiy built boilers that 
were frequently blowing up. killing 
and drowning the passengers. 
Travel on the river was a constant 
hazard because of the floating 
trees and innumerable sandbars. 
One hundred years ago, a trip from 
Winona to New Orleans and return 
was more of an adventure than a 
trip around the world today. 

In addition to seeing the steam- 
boat, with all of its original ma- 
chinery and equipment, you can 
visit the Museum of Upper Mis- 
sisnippi River Lore on the second 
deck, and listen to the calliope on 
the top side. Visiting hours are 
from 10-12, and 1-5. daily. A Tour 
Guide is on duty during these 
hours. A small charge of 25 cents 
is made for adults; children under 
12 years 10 cents. 

If you are ever in the vicinity of 
Winona which is south of Minne- 
apolis you will feel amply repaid if 
you take time out to see the 
Steamer "Julius C. Wilkie." 



CALIFORNIA 
WINES 

While averaging less than half 
the cost of their competitors. Cali- 
fornia wines have captured first 
place over foreign lands in 111 
taste tests, according to President 
Don W. McColIy of Wine Institute. 

These wine tastings have been 
held for six years in many parts of 
the United States. Results indi- 
cate, according to McCoUy, that in 



\// 




Mike's Automotive Service 



3360 - 20th St. 



E. MARTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Established 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 

EXbrook 7-2760 



virtually one out of two cases peo- 
ple cannot tell where wines come 
from without the bottle in front of 
them. 

The 111 testings took place with 
bottles and labels concealed. Wines 
were served in glasses that were 
alphabetically numbered and coded. 
This made the taste tests "blind" 
tastings insofar as the people en- 
tering into them were concerned. 
They never knew until their votes 
were counted exactly what brands 
of wine they'd sampled. 

People from all walks of life 
were invited to taste wines and 
then state their preference. These 
panelists included wine merchants, 
foot writers, stage, television and 
other celebrities, members of wine 
and food societies, ajid hundreds 
of others simply interested in wine 
as a hobby. 

Here are results of the 111 tast- 
ings, according to McColly: 

In "first-place" preference, tast- 
ers were asked which of four spe- 
( Continued on Page 13) 



Sacred Heart High Schoo 

1075 ELLIS STREET 
San Francisco 

Esmeralda's Beauty Saloi 

Beauty Specialist 
Hair Stylist 

5483 Mission St. JU 7-599 



Bob St. Clair's 
Liquors 



3910 - 24th St. 
1744 Mission St. 



MI 7-976- 
PL 5-490( 



Glen Hunter's Moving 

EXPRESS SL TRANSFER 

Slale-Wide Service 

3330 ORTEGA STREET 

MO 4-2644 LO 6-4301 



Fred's Ornamental 
Iron Works 

Gates, Balconies, Stairs, 

Window Guards 

140 Clementina St. EX 7-3111 



DORALYN'S 
Donut & Coffee Sliop 

Frank Whigham 

2496 Junipero Serra Blvd. 
DALY CITY 

B. F. Wooters Co. 

The Finest for 
INCOME & HOME 
PROPERTIES 
401 Judah St. MO 1-1 



Pacific Coast Builders 

No. 1 South Park 
San Francisco 



Enroll N oiv 

HILLTOP BEAUTY SCHOOL 

Hollywood Trained Instructors 

6317 Mission Street — Daly City PL 6-9877 

CLOSED MONDAYS 

THE RECO 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 12 1 
Ic wines they rated as "tops. " 
vo in each category were from 
ilifornia and two were foreign 
itages. Tasters never knew 
lich was which. Wins were pur- 
ased from retail stores. In this 
tnpilation California wines won 
lijj first places. Foreign wines 
in 183 '2. The margin was close 
d remained so in total points 
jred. California wines captuied 

over-all total of 33,997 prefer- 
ce points, and foreign wines 
jred 33,498 -a margin of only 
9 separating the California ver- 
9 foreign brands. 
Another question asked all wine 
iters was; "Do you think Wine 
' came from California or a for- 
jn counti-j' ? How about Wine 
1' 'C etc.?" They were asked 
i identical question for all wines 
ited — usually 16 at a tasting. Re- 
Its indicated that whereas 13.- 
5 votes correctly identified the 
nes as being California or for- 
;n, another 11,049 votes testified 

the fact that the tasters were 
npletely baffled. Without the 
ttle and its label of identity in 
int of them, they were uncertain 
lether 'Wine H" was a foreign 
itage or whether it came from 
lifornia. Almost one out of each 
votes was in error. 
Score three for California wines 
ne about in the price range, 
re the average prices of all ap- 
;izer and dessert wines tested 
licated a spectacular difference 
K.19 per bottle for the foreign 
8s and $1.77 for California wines. 



Sparkling wine price differences 
were even more lopsided. Where 
the average cost of the California 
sparkling wine.s was ,$4.33 per 
bottle, it was double that figure, 
$8.39 per bottle, for the bubbly 
wines from abroad. The average 
price per bottle for California table 
wine was $1.64, compared with 
$3.80 per bottle for foreign table 
wines. 

In the over-all evaluations, ob- 
servers who started only with a 
hunch ended the six years of tast- 
ings with specific evidence; Cali- 
fornia Sherries, Clarets, Burgim- 
dies, and Sauternes were preferred 
against foreign wines. Their com- 
bined total point superiority was 
1,281. Foreign types of Chablis, 
Rhine, Rose, and sparkling wines, 
on the other hand, outscored Cali- 
fornia types by 672 points. 

The over-all point differential 
separating California wines from 
foreign wines was less than three 
fourts of one per cent. 

Some of the tastings took place 
in exotic settings. Among the lo- 
cales were the Stork Club and the 
T a V e r n-on-the-Green, in New 
York; the Beverly Hilton Hotel and 
Romanoff's in Los Angeles; both 
the Chicago and San Francisco 
Press Clubs — and such noted resort 
hotels as Sun Valley Inn and the 
Boca Raton Club in Florida. Well- 
known personalities such as the 
late Ernest Hemingway, actresses 
Sophia Loren and Lucalle Ball and 
television star Art Linkletter were 
among the wine lovers who partici- 
pated in widely separated and pub- 
licized taste tests. 



Harold J. Cassidy 
Realty Co. 

A Complete Real Estate 

& Loan Service 

920 Irving St. MO 1-3550 

TELEPHONE MARKET 

Groceries - Produce 
Liquor ■ Wine - Beer 

895 Pine St. JO 7-9679 

Electronic Training Laboratory 

All phases of Electronics, 

full or part-time 

Electronics— TV for Men, Women 

111 Broadway OL 8-1114 

OAKLAND 

Iforge E. Bicker. D.S.C. 

Doctor Surgical Chiropody 
hildren Sc Adult Foot Orthopedics 
595 Mission Street Suite 207 

'A 4-2444 San Francisco 



G&Z Auto Upholstery 

Seat Covers - Cushions - Tops 
Boat Upholstery 

2707 Geary Blvd. JO 7-2646 



Ted's Auto Body & 
Fender Repair 

T. F. Sanchez Free Estimates 

1570 WALLER ST. 

MA 1-1400 



Bush Sandwich Shop 

open 7 A.M. to i P.M. 
Closed Saturday & Sunday 

240 KEARNEY STREET 
GA 1-6948 



A A Craftsman 
Upholstering Co. 

Recovering • Rt-painns • Re-stylins 

3476 MISSION STREET 

VA 4-6595 VA 4-3140 



Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

EMKhllsliccJ 1894 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 

Exxccutive Office .ind Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, California 

Anderson & Perkins, Inc. 

Licensed Si. Bonded — Bonded Correspondents at All Points 

Specialized Collection Service 

Phone EXbrook 2-8466 

31 GEARY STREET 

San Francisco 8 

TANFORAN FLOWERS by GENE 

6175 Mission Street DE. 3-4321 

DALY CITY 

FOSTER AND KLEISER 

DIVISION OF METROMEDIA, INC. 

Outdoor Advertising 



1675 EDDY STREET 



SAN FRANaSCO 19 



Price Convalescent Hospital 

331 Pennsylvania Ave. MI. 7-3587 

San Francisco, California 



RAY CICERONE 
REALTY 

specializing in 
POTRERO PROPERTY 
1542 - 20lh STREET - VA 4-9146 



Bill's Trucking 

BILL COTTON 
125 BARNEVEID — VA 6-70SO 



Stevenson Machine Works 

Lyle G. Stevenson 

YU 6-1264 

171 STILLMAN STREET 



Mollerich & Company 

GA 1-4131 
550 MISSION STREET 



TRICOLOR FRENCH RESTAORANT 

Dinner after 4 P.M. 

Closed Monday 

4233 GEARY BLVD. BA. 1-8707 



A&B GARMENT DELIVERY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

TOM MAXWELL 
2277 SHAFTER AVENUE-MI 8-7111 



RAYMUND Q. WONG 

INSURANCE BROKER 

Fire — Liability — Life — Auto 

WESTERN LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

818 CLAY STREET 
Bus: GA 1-3975 



GUST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 



BAY WINDOW 

I Continued from Page 3i 



800 assorted street cars and 
busses! 
The Citizens Committee Mrs. 
"cable car lady." It was she who. Klussmann organized developed 
some years ago. fo\ight the Mu- into one of the most energetic and 
nicipal Railway in an effort to pre- unusual groups this city has ever 
serve the famol i :iis that wing on seen. Composed of heavy numbers 
cables u\ 'u' city's hills, of transit "buffs," it has proceeded 

with startling dedication and vigor 
to prepart what should be a monu- 
mental "Muni Golden Week" for 
October 15. 




MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 
This time she was prevailed on by 
Mayor Christopher to adopt the 
entire system — with the somewhat 
amazing result that Mrs. Kluss- 
mann is now den mother not only 
to the cable cars but also to some 



Harold J. Cassidy Realty 
Co. 

Our New Address 
1900 Irving St. MO 1-3550 



Bonnie's Home 
for the Aged 

Mrs. Bonnie Nesbit, Mgr.-Owncr 
1 125 Geneva Ave. JU 5-8679 



Mabel Minton Guest 
HOUSE 

Fwe Food 
1090 Page St. HE 1-9253 



ROBERT ALCHIAN 

JEWELER - WATCHMAKER 

Diamonds— A nliques— gifts 

1123 Taraval Street OV 1-6389 



Coast Casket Company 

74 Langton Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

UN 3-2324 



Silver Crest Do-Nut Shop 

340 Bayshorc Blvd. 
SAN FRANCISCO 




GILBERT H. KNEISS 

Assistant to the President in charge of 

Public Relations, Western Pacific 

Railrood 

The week will start with the re- 
turn to Market Street of "Old No. 
1." the first streetcar to roll for 
the new system back in 1912. It 
will go between 2nd and 11th 
Streets during the week, this fine 
old open-ended vehicle, having 
been affectionately restored by a 
number of volunteers from both 
the Muni and the Bay Area Elec- 
tric Railroad Association. And the 
fare to be charged, with fitting 
nostalgia, will be 5 cents a ride. 
"Old No. 1" is the idea of Gilbert 
Knei.ss of Western Pacific, to 
whom Bay Window doffs its hat in 
gratitude. 



PHIL EGAN 
Watch & Clock Repairing 



511 V,ilenci; 



HE 1-8751 



COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING 
SHOP 

Malt Spoter, Mgr. Oniler 
1846 Union St. FI 6-7793 



WINSTON'S MOVING 
& STORAGE CO. 

2164 Market St. YU 6-2448 



rdephone 761-1085 

II A R V I S Construction, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
W. C. "Bill" Harr, President 

3 33 EL C AMINO REAL 

South San Francisco, California 

Berkeley Hills Chapel 

One o/ California's Finest 

1600 SHATTUCK AVE., at Cedar Street 
THornwall 1-2300 Berkeley 9, California 

In Walnut Creek - PLE.-^SANT HILL AREA - see 

OAK PARK HILS CHAPEL 
MAGLEBY, PAGE and ODER 

3111 NORTH MAIN WALNUT CREEK 

EXbrok 2-1313 - Telephones - EXbrook 2-1829 

GEORGE L. BURGER 

Wholesale Dealer Potatoes and Onions 

52 VALLEJO STREET 
San Francisco 11, California 

The Lowrie Paving Co., Inc. 

J. F. Lowrie, President ..—.. James W. Lowrie, Vice-President 

San Francisco Yard, 2170 Oakdale Ave., San Francisco 24, Calif. 

R. J. Kilroy, Superintendent 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Grading — Paving — Underground Ckjnstruction 

Main Office and Yard Lowrie Avenue, South San Francisco, Calif. 
(415) PO 1-2265 (415) JU 3-3574 

SHEEDY DRAYAGE CO. 

SHEEDY TRANSPORTATION CO. 

Crane, Rigging and Lift Service up to 40 Tons .. 
Machinery and Equipment Hauling 
1215 MICHIGAN STREET 
W. A. STATTON, President 



133 Geary St. Suite 729 near Grant 

SALON de COIF 

Specializing in Eska Protein Waves from 

Thelma Mathews formerly of H. Liebes 

$ 1 5.00 

Mr. Robert formerly of Drake Wilshire 
Open Every Day From 9:.V) AM. 9:00 P.M. 



DO 2-2591 



THE RBCO. 



For Health's Sake 

in Home and Office 




CRANE 

PEST CONTROL 

FREE ESTIMATES WA 2 1666 

the Smith company 

Direct Mail Creation SC Production 

Richard C. Smith, President 

47 Fremont Street SU 1-6564 

San Francisco 5 



Indo-Ctiina Restaurant 

Joe Jung 

263 OFARRELL STREET 

San Francisco 



Tao-Tao Restaurant 

675 JACKSON STREET 
YU 2-6125 



TOWER TV 

SALES & SERVICE 

Seorge Hagosian SC John Atwod 

729 PORTOLA DRIVE 
MO 1-1350 



1. Armanino & Son, Inc. 

Chive Growers 

250 WILLIAMS AVE. 
]\J 6-3440 



COACHMAN 

057 Powell EX 2-9903 

DINNER 

5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

Specialising in English Dishes 

:nglish Ale Open 7 days 



RE-LY-ON Van Service 

140 HOWARD ST. 
SU 1-8438 



PICKWICK 
MOTOR HOTEL 

O. C. Campbell, Mgr. 

5th 8C Mission Sts. 

San Francisco 

GA 1-7500 

Free Overnight Parking 
us lo Ball Park at Front Door 
Visit our Byline Cocl.iil Lounge 



Baylacq French Laundry 

SK 1-091 
116 CLEMENT STREET 



KOTZBECK GALLERIES 

Fine Prints - Expert Framing 

Originals in Water Colors 

and Oils 

2031 Fillmore St. FI. 6-562 



ALAMEDA NURSING HOME 

24 HOUR CARE, BED i AMBULATORY 

Patients— Men and Women 

1824 Central Ave. LA. 2-8403 

ALAMEDA 



Pacific Motor 
Trucking Co. 

no MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 



Sky-Way Baptist Church 

Marshall S. DeVaughn, Pastor 

300 Gaven Street San Francisco 

Church JU 6-5048 

Parsonage JU 6-9397 



GRAND MARKET 

Be Sure to Visit Our 
GROCERY Dept. 

1814 Polk St. OR 3-1846 



MO DORMAN CO. 

office furniture and interiors 

785 MISSION STREET 

DOuglas 2-5713 San Francisco 3 



Welcome to 



JIMBO'S BOP CITY 

1690 POST STREET 
FI 6-2412 



Colonial Florists 

Grace & Pete Bria 
Flowers for All Occasions 

1 1 50 Hillside Blvd. PL 5-2556 

Colma 



MUINI RAILWAY 

(Continued from Page 10 1 



Market Street ;the track removal 
eliminated forever the sight of 
streetcars moving majestically 
or these companies were merged Iw abreast up and down the city's 
in the newly organizod Market main thoroughfare, but it speeded 
Street Cable Railway. The second 'iP pas.senger service by providing 
big transit con.solidation look place more space for coach movements, 
in 1902 when the United Railroads San Francisco felt the full im- 
of San Francisco wa.s created by P^^ct of the really "new" Muni on 
uniting the Market Street Rail- Sunday, July 3, 1949— a red letter 
way, the Sutter Street cable sys- day for transit — when the old 
teni and the independent electric streetcars on the Nos. 5, 6, 7, and 
lines. Only three cable roads- the 21 lines were replaced by trolley 
California Street, the Union Street coach operation. On that same day 
and the Geary Street remained service was inaugurated or ex- 
independent. Of these, the Geary tended on nine motor coach lines- 
line cea.sed to exist with the con- Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4. 20, 2,'5, 31, 55 and 
struction of the Muni; later the "H"-night. A study of the affected 
Union line was absorbed by the lines showed a 64-percent increase 
fledgling Muni; and only the Call- in the frequency of peak-hour serv- 
fornia Cable remained. ice, and the number of seats avail- 

The United Railroads had ac- ''^^'' °" "'^'^^ ""^^ "'"'"« the peak 
quired a bond obligation from the """""^ '"'"" ""'^ increased by 52 
Market Street Railway, and when P'"-'^^"^. Subsequently, the open- 



the bonds became due in 1918, the 
United was unable to meet the 



ended "iron monster" streetcars 
on the "J," "K," "L," "M" and "N" 



obligation. This led to another re- ""^^ ""^"^ replaced by streamlined. 



organization in 1921 when the 
Market Street Railway Corpora- 



one-man PCC ("President Confer- 
ence Car") streetcars. The last of 



tion was revived to take over the ""^ two-man "iron monsters" oper- 

United Railroads, Since the transit ^^^^ °" ^ scheduled run May 9, 

field in San Francisco was thus ^^^*' "'^" ''°"^'' '"'° retirement, 
narrowed to virtually two sys- The postwar specter of the tran- 

tems, there developed between the sit industry nationally has been the 

privately-owned Market Street and decline of passengers in inverse 

the publicly-owned Muni an intense ratio to the increa.se of private 

competition. Over the years, half transportation. The effect on Muni 

a dozen attempts to purchase the patronage has consistently been 

Market Street Railway were de- jess than the national average due 

feated at the polls. ^ jt^ program of continued im- 

The recurrent decisions of the provements in equipment and serv- 

voters against consolidation placed ice and retention of a 15-cent fare 

the city in a peculiar position. Its with full tranfer privileges. The 

declaration for ultimate public fare is one of the country's biggest 

ownership a matter of record, the transit bargains, with only two 

city knew that franchises on many other major cities. New York and 

Market Street lines had expired, New Orleans, charging comparable 

but it could not take over — and im- amounts. 



prove — the service without voter 
approval. 

Finally, in 1944, the battle be- 
tween the two transit vehemoths ». . .. 

,„„„ , , J r ■,, ^ tion to the overall traffic prob em. 

was resolved once and for all when ,„.,..,_, 

c „ . , . »,_ . , The policy is based on recognition 

San Francisco's voters authorized , .. ,, . ... , ,Z. ,. ,. 
of the Mum as a virtual lifeline 



Reason for the low fare is San 
Francisco's official policy to sup- 
port transit as the least cost solu- 



the purchase of the Market Street 
system— $2,000,000 cash and $5,- 
500.000 in future earnings of the 
combined properties. September 
29, 1944, was a milestone date in 
the Muni's history when, at 5 
o'clock that morning, the merging 
of the two systems took place. Now 
all lines in San Francisco were 



between the heavily - populated 
outer districts and the vital down- 
town shopping and financial sec- 
tions, an area small in size but 
giant in economic proportions since 
it comprises the major part of the 
city's tax base. 

To serve its passengers — some 



under municipal ownership with 670,000 each weekday — the Muni 

the single exception of the Cali- schedules 835 vehicles over 691 

fornia Cable line. (The California round-trip miles of route on 61 bus, 

was taken over by Muni in 1952.) trolley coach, streetcar and cable 

Due to the demands of a war- '^*'' ''"^*- 

time economy, however, the Muni's The little one-line system that 

modernization program was slow started 50 years ago with the 10 

in getting undei-way. At war's end streetcars proudly parading down 

the most notable change was the (^ary Street has grown to full 

removal of the outer tracks on size! 



IGUST - SEPTEMBER, 1962 



^bllc Libr-jry, 
Periodicals Room , 
Civic Center. City 2. 




C^^S 



EAGLESOX 
EXOIXEERS 

615 Saiisome Street 
San Francisco 11, California 




CLARENCE IV. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



FruilTole Chapel 

1580 FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEII09 3-4 1 M 



Elmhursl Chapel 
8901 E. Ulh STREET 

NEptune 2-4343 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San FrancJKO, Cali(. 
Permit No. 4507 



^(natiCMicUtiiti^exp^ncctice... 




Located at 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



William O. (Rill) 

DUFFY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
TAX CONSULTANT 



2888 MISSION ST. 



AT. 2-4151 



■ 



PbclUUlCAL 'JC?T. 175,000,000 GALLONS DAILY 

MPV T '. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




The historic spill of O'Shaughnessy Dam was observed by 
President Stuart N. Greenberg of Public Utilities Commission 



OCTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1962 



A NEW LOOK FOR RAPID TRANSIT 




This illustration of n typical suburban station shows how the proposed Bay 
Area rapid transit system will provide convenient transfer facilities to insure 
full coordination with feeder bus service and the private automobile. Spacious 
parking lots and bus transfer facilities will be provided at all suburban stations, 
with passengers traveling between ground level and train level at aerial stations 
on escalators. Provision of fully coordinated service has been planned to insure 
the highest level of service not only to patrons in direct service areas but, as 
well, to residents of outlying communities. Planning of feeder bus routes 
already has been initiated by rapid transit district engineers. 



ABBOT A. HANKS, Inc. 

Established 1866 

Engineers - Chemists - Assayers 

1300 SANSOME STREET 
San Francisco 



Inspection - Tests - Control 

Structural Materials 

Tests and Investigations 

Foundation Soils 

Assay and Chemical 

EXbrook 7-2464 




Good old Ben 
would be amazed 



at how many different ways we make electricity 
these days. The power that pulses through your 
home may be generated by falling water, fuel oil, 
natural gas, a geyser— even the atom! No other 
utility company makes so much electricity in so 
many different ways — at such reasonable rates. 
The price of PG&E gas and electricity in a typical 
home is 8% less than it was i^^-^ ,*f 
thirty years ago! sfsS^,^JEi 






M and M Express & Nisei Movers 








Carejul ■ Competent Service 








George Taragaw;i 






116 


DOWNEY STREET LO 


4-4 


24 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

1745 FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 3, California 

UNderhiU 1-14SS 

Stan Seaman 

California Tropliy and Engraving Co. 

PRospcct 6-6932 

Jewelry — Diamonds — Watches 

299 Ellis Street San Francisco 2, California 



THE RECOI 



NOV 1 - 



■AN mANcwee 



bay wind 







VHEW! 
The fever was fierce, wasn't 

The disease was of epidemic pro- 
rtions; not only was every San 
anciscan badly infected but so 
is everyone in the entire Bay 
•ea. Even Oakland! 
Result: Joy and agony. The ter- 
)le .suspense of day.s that were 
J rainy. The huddling around 
^s. The biting of nails. 
And after it was all over — 
ter the million and one lost 
If days of work and shopping 
d houeswork and, even, school — 
e final shining conviction; The 
ants played like champs! 

GOLDEN MUNI: Well, in spite 
the World Series, in spite of the 
:ather, in spite of the election- 
ring, the Muni finally was given 
birthday party to end all birth- 
y parties. 

San Francisco rocked and rolled 
ring the Muni Golden Week pro- 
am, with an "old" fashion .show 
Union Square, a cable car bell- 
iging contest that was LOUD, 



a Golden Coach roaming the city, 
the return of the "Old No. 1" 
streetcar to Market Street, an art 
contest in the schools, a superb 
exhibition of rare old tran.sit pho- 
tographs at the Maritime Museum, 
a big part.v at the St. Francis Ho- 
tel — and all during the week those 
lovely, crazy little cable cars run- 
ning up and down their hills wear- 
ing all kinds of fantastic decora- 
tions. 

Speaking of the LOUD bell-ring- 
ing contest, at one point there was 
noisy bedlam in front of City Hall 
where Vice President Ted White 
of the Public Utilities Commission 
and President Pete Tamaras of the 
Board of Supervisors conducted a 
duel for the City Fathers Champ 
title. After a 15-minute session 
that had denizens of the Hall hang- 
ing out the windows with agon- 
ized, pleading expressions, the 
judges sagely ended the contest 
by deciding it was a draw. Judges 




Hotel's bright young man, did a 
.saturation job of getting the Muni's 
motorized cable car around the 
city; he was chairman of the bell- 
ringing business. Now that it's 
over Coakley's concentrating on 
Coakley: Yes, it's Pete's dad, Judge 
Tom, who is running for Attorney 
General. 

THE GOLDEN POINT: The 
(Continued on Page 14) 



PETER TAMARAS 
Supervisor Rings Bell 

were Golden Committee Chairman 
Mrs. Hans Klussmann, the Chron- 
icle's Mel Wax and Jim Leonard 
of the News-Call. 

Peter Coakley, the St. Francis 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

rhe Magazine of Good Gorernmeiil 
San Frandsco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 

Editor and PuWisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

OCTOBER - NOVEMBER. 1962 
VOLUME 29 NUMBER 6 



PETRINI PLAZA 






FALLETTI 






and 






BALDOCCHI 






FINER FOODS 




phone 


Jordan 7-0976 fullon and 


masonic 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




L ven mo&t lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranRer, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 
low. 

C/-Driv«, 

Limousines, 

Charter Buses 

available 



Depot: 



44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



CTOBER - NOVEMBER, 1962 



Woldeii Files for Re-election 

Assessor Russell L. Wolden has filed for re-election. 

Accompanied by his wife, Virginia, and their 12-year-old daughter. 
Starry, Wolden filed his declaration of candidacy in the office of Reg- 
istrar of Voters Charles A. Rogers. 




Assessor tij;;ei L, Wolden (right) files for re-election at the 
Registrar's Office in City Hall with (I. to r.) Registrar of Voters 
Charles A. Rogers, Wolden's wife, Virginia, and his 12-year-old 
daughter. Starry, on hand. Wolden's office has been acclaimed 
one of the outstanding assessor's offices in the country, and he 
has won national recognition for his fair, efficient and non- 
partisan administration. 

Assessor Wolden said his campaign organization will be headed 
by Joseph L. Alioto, prominent attorney. 

Alioto announced that Wolden's candidacy has the support of a wide 
cross-section of San Francisco business, professional, labor and civic 
leaders. 

"Mr. Wolden has earned the confidence and respect of the people 
for the efficient administration of an office which is linked so closely 
with the economic growth of our city and welfare of its citizens," 
said Alioto. 

"He had dedicated his public life to a policy of equitable property 
assessments without regard to political considerations. During his 
administration, his office has become one of the outstanding assessor' 
offices in the United States." 

Wolden wa first elected to office in 1939. He has been re-elected 
with a tremendous popular vote five times, in 1942, 1946, 1950, 1954 
and 1958. 

Assessor Wolden has pioneered in many phases of his specialized 
field. He was first to install electronic equipment in his office; he was 
first, among a.sse.ssors in the nation, to establish an appraisal "task 
force," members of his staff who travel throughout the country to 
audit firms which do business in San Francisco but whose records are 
in headquarters located in other cities of the country. Such audits serve 
to insure that competing eastern and mid-western firms bear their 
fair share of the local tax burden. 

Since 1949, Wolden's traveling auditors have added $2,200,000 in 
tax revenue at a cost of approximately $.50,000 in travel expense. 

Wolden is resognized in the State and nation as a top authority 
on property assessments. He is a member of the advi.sory council of 
the International Association of Assessing Officers and has .served 
on it executive board; he is past president of the California Association 
of County Assessors and holds membership on the executive and stand- 
ards committees of that organization. 




INCUMBENT 
Re-Elect 

EDWARD MANCUSO 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 



* 24-Hour Line Service — * Aircraft S-forage 

* Approved Electronic Center 

* Maintenance and Overhaul 




BUTLER AVIATION- 
SAN FRANCISCO INC. 

San Francisco International Airport 
Executive Aircraft Terminal 



San Francisco 28. California 



Telephone: JUno J-8J00 



THE RECOR 



S. F. Launches a $115,000,000 Program 
To Meet Service Area Water Needs 



Fiscal 1961-62 was a year of history-making progress for the great 1 —Construction of additional ply of 400,000.000 gallons daily to 

ater system that starts at Hetch Hetchy in the High Sierra and flows aqueduct and local storage to in- its customers. 

17 miles to join with the local reservoirs in the perennial task of crease the system's delivery capac- With increased delivery capacity 

Iking the domestic and industrial thirst of San Francisco, the ity to approximately 300,000,000 being the most urgent requirement, 



gallons daily. 

This will nearly double the pres- 




minsula and the South Bay. During the year 

1 A $115,000,000 water bond proposition was passed by an ove 
lelming majority. The single 
rgest measure ever to be ap- 
oved by San Francisco voters, it 
is designed as a self-supporting 
ogram to nearly double the water 
stems deliveiy capacity and to 
ore than double its storage ca- 
city. 

2 — Engineering was commenced 
imediately following passage of 
e water bonds, and construction 

the most vital elements — to in- 
ease delivery -was programmed 

start in fiscal 1962-63. 
3 — All of the suburban wholesale 
stomrs signed long-term con- 
lets to purchase their supple- 
ental water from the San Fran- 
ico Water Department, thus 
laranteeing a firm market for 
Iter sales during the repayment 
riod of the water bonds. 
4 — A system-wide rate reduction 
r both San Francisco and sub- 
ban customers of the Water De- 
rtment was approved by the 
iblic Utilities Commission, an ac- 
m stemming directly from pass- 
e of the water bonds. ''^^ °" Hetch Hetchy for a good ent capacity and will take care of 

, „ .u <: t > inco two-thirds of its water and on lo- the service area's expanding wat- 

5 — For the first tmie smce 1958 '^ " 

cal storage for the rest, includes er needs at least to the year 1985. 

^^ ^^ ^ ^ most of San Mateo County and 2 — Construction of additional 

unty reservoIrsriLlke Llovdand P^'"'^ °^ northern Santa Clara and water storage in the mountains to 

ke Eleanor-a circumstance as- «°"'hern Alameda counties. guarantee the system's eventual 

ring an abundant supply of wat- The urgent necessity to expand ability to serve a dependable sup- 

and uninterrupted operation of the system at this particular time 

: city's mountain hydroelectric is pointed up by the steep climb in 

mts. average consumption since 1930 

5— Major construction was un- when the city bought the Spring 

r way on the Canyon power pro- Valley Water Company and went 

;t. second of the two High Sierra mto the water business. Then it 

/elopments— the Cherry power was 52,000,000 gallons per day— 

Jject was completed in 1960— fo'' A^cal 1961-62 it was more than 

der the $54,000,000 bond issue 175,000.000 gallons daily! This 

1955. Pas.sage of the water would have been uncomfortably 

nds-in November, 1961, by an close to the 180,000,000 gallons con- 

precedented 11-to-l vote— meant sidered to be the safe sustained 

It the system could be built to a daily delivery capacity of the pres- 

pacity that will meet future ent system -the "ability to serve" 

Bds of San Francisco and con- capacity— had not the water bond 

ue to meet the constantly-in- program been approved, 

iasing needs of the booming sub- As it progresses, the program 

3an areas served by the Water will provide solutions to the water 

partment. This area, which re- problem in two areas: 



top engineering priority was given 
to a third pipeline across the San 
Joaquin 'Valley and a fourth pipe- 
line to carry water from the Irv- 
ington portal of the Coast Range 
(Continued on Page 10 1 



A record run-otf of melting snow from the granite-faced watershed of the 
Tuolumne River in the High Sierra had tilled Hetch Hetchy reservoir to 
capacity by mid-June, and O'Shaughnessy Dam spilled for the first time since 
1958. 



int Hetch Hetchy filled to capac 
as did its companion Tuolumne 



THE HONGKONG 
AND SHANGHAI 

BANKING 

CORPORATION 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Subsidiary of The Hongkong Bonk 
Sroup which hos more thon 140 
offices throughout the world . . , 

Total assets $1,340,000,000 




SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



FRANK J. MOHR 



Investment Secin*ities 
Stocks - Bonds 

454 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
San Franciseo 1 1, California 

EXbrook 7-5138 



rrOBER - NOVEMBER. 1962 



A Message From 
GOVERNOR BROWN 




Greetings to my friends in San Francisco city and county 
government. 

I hope you will continue to support me as you have done 
in the past. 

EDMUND G. "PAT" BROWN 

The Man California Can Trust 



AIRPORT DRAYAGE COMPANY 

PHONE JUno 9-1880 
San Francisco 28, California 

San Francisco International Airport 

SHREVE & CO. 

Jewelers 

POST 8C GRANT AVENUE GA 1-2600 

SAN FRANCISCO 

CHIN & HENSOLT 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
San Francisco, California 



Re-Elect 




CONGRESSMAN 

JOHN F. SHELLEY 

FIFTH DISTRICT 



McLEOD & CLARD CORP. 

633 Bayshore Blvd. 
JU 4-6945 



Roland H. Osterberg 

DIAMOND SETTER 
1509 Ocean Av«. JU 4-8950 

BELL BAZAAR 

STATIONERY _ CARDS — TOYS 



WONG'S GROCERY 

cries • Beer • Wine ■ Mci 
1135 - 18th Street 

MI..7.1I))7 



SCOTT'S HARDWARE 

FULLER PAINTS 
Housewares • Builders' Hardw 
2501 Irving St. 
SE 1-1149 



STELLA PASTRIES 

For ALL OCCASIONS 

Cakes - Pastries - Cookici 

446 Columbus Ave. 

JU-f.-I-JM 



FRED G. AINSLIE 

Real Estate 6f Insurance 

Notary Public 

1346 Pollc St. OR 3-7400 



Bay Super Market 

LIQUORS - WINE - BEER 

Free Delivery & Parking 

2525 Jones St. OR 3-5585 



The WHITE 
MOTOR CO. 

5th ac Brannan Sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



E & V CAFETERIA 

ALWAYS GOOD COFFEE 

Sandwiches A Specialty 

2340 Geary Street WA 1-9801 



Engineers fl 

1045 Sansome St. EX 2-6698 • 



Miraloma Pharmacy 

Let us fill your next prescription 
Free pick up and delivery 

63 Portola Drive LO 6-1 lOO 



ROYAL GUEST HOME 

For Aged and Retired People 
A Warm Friendly Place to Stay 

RADIO - TV - AUTO RIDES 

1192 Page Street HE 1-5772 



Victoria Pastry Co., Inc. 

Italian and French Pastries 

and Confections 

Cakes for All Occasions 

1362 Stockton Street 

SU 1-2015 



THE RECORr 



Around and About 



By WHIT HENRY 



L ROUND about this time of 
i. year most of us are sticking 
: noses out the front door of a 
iming and trying to malte up our 
nds whether to dress for a dank 
vnpoiu' a heavy freeze, or a 
leral blizzard 

leather has always been some- 
ng of a worry to man and from 
le to time all through the ages 
neone has always been coming 
with some new notion as to how 
can tell what the weather is 
ng to be. 

rake the folk from the back 
intrj". They've put many little 
al observations together and feel 
it this is the one sure way to 
1 how the wind will blow or the 
(w will snow in the hours or 
?s ahead. They take a look at 
: fur on certain animals or the 
iks on corn, and decide from 
! thickness of these just how 
ere the winter is going to be. 
ey watch the time that the 
ivers start to build their winter 
nes or the geese start to mi- 
ite, and by that they feel they 
I tell when the snows will come. 



They also keep a sharp eye on 
how much the .squirrel seems to be 
laying in for the winter, on how 
high the hornets are building their 
nests, and on just what happens 
when the ground hog comes out 
to look about for his shadow. 

The folk who live down by the 
sea have their little signs of warn- 
ing, too. Codfish are supposed to 
take on ballast, swallow small 
stones, when a storm is on its way. 
Porpoises come into the harbor, 
sharks move out to sea, eels get 
jumpy, and gulls move inland when 
the big winds and heavy rains are 
about to blow in. 

Some people go even further in 
their attempts to change or predict 
the weather. Some Indians have 
tried to bring on rain by turn- 
ing a dead snake over on its back 
or hanging it or its skin from a 
tree. Some watch the foimations 
that the geese make in the sky 
and learn from these formations of 
the frosts that are to come. Others 
blame the rainbow for "sucking up 
the rain" or look to the position 
(Continued on Page 12) 



KOBE GARDENS 

FEATURING THE FINEST IN JAPANESE FOODS 

EVERY CONSIDERATION GIVEN TO BANQUETS 

RESERVATIONS — PR. 5-7507 

156 TAYLOR ST., SAN FRANCISSO PR. 5-99; 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 



LA PERLA MARKET 

MEXICAN SPECIALTIES - TORTILLA FACTORY 

MANUEL MANOZ, Manager 

JU. 9-3830 



222 Lux Avenue 



So. San Francisco 



GREER REALTY COMPANY 



REAL ESTATE 
4624 Geary Blvd. 
Branch: 1112 Taraval St. 



LOANS — INSURANCE 



BA. 1-2353 
LO. 4-4410 



TOBY'S FISH AND POULTRY 

Fresh killed poultry and fish daily. We raise our own 
poultry in Petaluma. Specializing in sea food cocktails. 

MOntrose 1-1438 



2339 Noriega Street 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

BURLINOAME, California 







Claude Berhouet and Claudine Berhouct, Props. 

Hotel de France 

BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 

780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

Sweetheart Hams and Bacon 
"Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-013 1 

San Francisco 



Baylacq French Laundry 

SK 1-091 
116 CLEMENT STREET 



THE DEPOT CAFETERIA 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner 
697 -3rd St. SU 1-8631 



TOBER - NOVEMBER, 1962 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Hall 
O.'orgo Chrtstophe 
.lotm n. Sullivt 
Itnlierl M. Sin: 
MiifKaret Sinlt 
John L, Mootj 
rtoliert Rockw. 



MA 1-0163 
. Mayor 

n. Kxerutlve Secretary 
loy, Tonndentlal Secretary 

I. Personal Secretary 
Administrative Assistant 

II. P\ihllc Service Director 



SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

2.15 ritv Hall HH 1-2121 

Mei'ts Monday at 2 P.M. 
Peter Tamaras, President. 1020 Harrison 
William C. Blake. 90 Polsom St. 
UoKer Boas. 2.32S Geary St. 
.Toseph M. Casey, 2,'">28 Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Dobbs. 351 California St. 
r>r. Charles A. Ertnla. 2ri3 Cnlumlnis Ave. 
Jotin J. Ferdon. IBS Monteoniery St. 
.Tames I,. Hallev. S70 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 
.I.-H-k Morrison. 2590 Oreonwich St, 
.Toseph v.. TInney. 2S17 Mission St. 

Robert .T. Polan. Clerk 

r.llllan M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 

Commercial & Industrial Development — Boas. Blake. 
Casey 

County. State and National Affairs — Ferdon. Dobbs. 
McMahon 

Education, Parks and Recreation — Ertola. Blake, 
Casey 

Finance, Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs, Ferdon, 
Halley 

.ludlclary. Leeislatlve and Civil Service — Tinney, 
McMahon, Morrison 

Police — Casey. Ertola, Tinnev 

Public Buildings, I.ands and City Planning— Mor- 
rison. Boas. Tinney 

Public Health and Welfare— McMahon, Halley, Mor- 

Pnblic I'tilitie.s- Hallev, Dobbs, Ferdon 
Streets and Highways— Blake. Boas. Ertola 
Kulc-s— Tamaras, Dobbs, Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall KL, 2-1910 

P.nBsell U Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

. 2CI0 rily Hall HE 1-1322 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

ssri Hr.vant .St. K 1.3-9111 

Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC OEFENDiER 

S.'.o Bryant St. KL 3-"='" 

Edward T. MancusD 

SHERIFF 

.131 City Hall HE 1-: 

Matthew C. Carberiy 
TREASURER 

110 City Hall HE 1-: 

John J. Goodwin 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor, City Hall UN 1-8552 

Ruyniond J. Arata Francis McCarty 

Carl H. Allen Edward Molkenbuhr 

Byron Arnold Clarence W. Morris 

John W. Bussey Harry J. Neubarth 

Walter t;arpenetl Raymond J. O'Connor 

C. Harold Caulfield Edward F. ODay 

Melvyn I. Cronln Charles S. Peery 

Norman Elklngton George W. Schonfeld 

Timothy I. Fitzpatrlck William F. Traverso 

Joseph Karc."h Alvln E. Weinberger 

Gerald S. Levin H. A. van der Zee 

Joseph M. Cummins, Secretary 

4S0 City Hall UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall KL 2-3008 

Andrew J. Eyman. Presidiiic I.*land J. Lazarus 

Albert A. Axelrod <*Iarcnce A. Linn 

Kmmct Daly George B. Maloney 

Robert J. Drcwes William A. O'Brien 

Bernard B. OUckfeld LenoreD. Underwood 

Clayton W. Horn James J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-3008 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

sr.l) Br.vam St. KL 2-:iO(lS 

Jiirncs Lcdriy. Chiif Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

4.i7 City Hall UN 1-S552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
William McDonnell. Foreman 
Dr. Donald Schulz, Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

SSO Bryant St. KL 3-9111 

John D. Kavanaugh, Chief Adult Probation Officer 
ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrlck 'VauKhan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St 
Raymond Blosser. 681 Market St. 
Rt, Rev. Matthew P. Connolly. 399 Freinont St. 
William Moskovitz. 5030 C.carv Blvd 
Robert A. Peahodv. 456 Post St 
Adolph L. Plerotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratio. 405 California St. 

JUVENILE COURT 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5740 

Hon. Melvyn I. Cronin. Presiding Judge 
Thomas F. Strycula, Chief Probation Officer 

JUVENILE JUSTICE COMMISSION 

Meets 2nd Thursday of month; 1:00 P.M. 

375 Woodside Avenue 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 79 New Montgomery SI. 
Reverend Hamilton T. Boswell, 1975 Post St. 
Reverend John A. Collins. 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Reverend James B. Flynn, 1825 Mission St. 
Miss Myra R. Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Mrs. Horace Guittard, 3871 Jackson St. 
Mr. Thomas J. Lenehan. 501 Haight St. 
Mr. William M. Reedy, 55 Fillmore St. 
Airs. Mathew O. Tobriner, 3494 Jackson St. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mlgnola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harr.v D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean 

940 - 25th St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator, Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St 

Bernard C. Begley M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Nell Slnton, 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagopian, 220 Bush St. 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson, 2836 Vallejo SL 

William E. Knuth, 1600 Holloway Ave. 



Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Ho 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commissi 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 I.,;irkin St. HE 1-21 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 

Cardncr W. Mein. Pres.. 315 .Montgomery St. I 
Louis Mark Cole, 1958 Vallejo St. ( 

James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 
George Thomas Rockrise. 405 Sansome St. 
Alvin H. Baum. Jr.. 14 Montgomery St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller. Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall HE 1-21 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Hubert J. Sober. President, 155 Montgomery St. 
Richard (.;. Ham, Vice Pres., 200 Bush St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick. S27 Hyde St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 
DISASTER CORPS 

SSO Bryant St. KL 3-H 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.), Director 
Alex X. McCausland, Public Information Officer 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-46 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 
170 Pell St. 

Samuel Ladar. President. Ill Sutter St. 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper, Jr., 10 Walnut St. 
Adolfo de Urioste, 512 Van Ness Ave. 
Edward Kemmitt. 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Claire Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 2O00 Washington St. 
James E. Straiten, 800 Presidio Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt. of Schools and Sect 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 1-801 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

Dr. Peter Angel. President. 1S67 - 15th Ave. 

Charles R. Greenstone. 182 Second St. 

Philip Dindia. 536 Bryant St. 

William F. Murray, Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes, Chief, Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1-211 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Donald J. McCook, President, 220 Montgomery SL 

George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 

Donald M. Campbell, M.D., 977 Valencia St. 

Prank J. Collins, 2614 - 16th Ave. 

Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Robert E. Hunt, Claims Supervisor 
Lyie J. O'Connell, Executive Director 

Ex-Officio 

Chairman, Finance Comm 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3-58(1 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jacob Shemano, Chairman. 130 Montgomery St 
John E. Gurich, 300 Montgomery St. V 

Solomon B. Johnson, 704 Market St. 
T. Kong Lee, 715 Sacramento St. 
Joseph P. Mazzola, 1621 Market St. 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 
PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. he 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 
David ThoriLson. Chairman. 65 Berrv SI 
Arthur S. Becker. 3475 California St. 
Donald Magnln. 77 O'Farrell St. 
G, HaltziT P.tcr.son. 2910 Vallejo St. 
lolm K. Sullivan. 69 West Pi>rtal Ave. 

Vlnlng T. Fisher, General Manager 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 

.Icronie Cohen, Legal Counsel 

Helen M. Wills. Confidential Sectv. to Dlr ^ 

Helen M. Juzlx, Senior clerk Stenographer 



Members 
littee. Board of 



THE RECORIi 



•RMIT APPEALS, bUARD OF 
227 Clly Ilnll 
Meets every Wodnesdny at S:n 

Mux MiMiie. President 
lllnin H. H. Hiivis, !1,14 lA)lsoin St 
orge C.IIIIn. 40!11 - 19th Ave. 
jrenee .1. Walsh. 2450 - 17th St. 
nest I. West, 2f>5 MontRomery I 
J. Kdwlii Mattox, Kxeeutlve S. 



ILICE COMMISSION 

850 BryHtit Street Kl, :;-ll 

Meets every Monday at 6:00 P.M. 
ul A. BIsainBer. rresldent, 415 Sansonie St. 
.rold R. MeKlnnon, 2.">5 t'alifornla St. 
n Kazaikerley. 851 Howard St. 

Thomas J. Cahill. Chief of Police 
Alfred J. Nelder, Ileputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas ZaraRoza. Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel P. McKlem, Chief of Inspectors 
L.t. Wm. J. OBrlen, Commission Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler, Department Secretary 



IBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 



Meets 1st Tuesday of i 



HR 1-2121 
nth at 3:30 P.M. 



omas W. S. W'u. D.D.S., President 

*n M. Kransten. 665 - 3rd St. 
Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 

se M. FanucchI, 1445 Stockton St. 

irtlmer Flelshhacker. .Jr.. 601 Californi: 

irparet V. (lirdner. 2130 Pulton St. 

ward B. Heavev, 6S Post St. 

Iton K. lyepetlch, 1655 Polk Street 

«. J. Henry Mohr, 2 Castenada Ave. 

V. William Turner, 1642 Broderlck St. 

L#e Vavuris. nao (ioary St. 
William R. Holman, Librarian 
Frank A. Clarvoe. Jr., Secretary 



IBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
lart N. Oreenberg. President. 765 Folsom St. 
•t Simon, 1350 Folsom St. 
orge F. Hansen, 215 Market St. 
omas P. White, 400 Brannan St. 
omas F. Stark. 703 Market St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood. Manager of Utilities 

James J. Finn, Secretary to Commission 

Bureaus and Departments 
:ounts, 287 City Hall ' HE 1-2121 

George Negri, Director 
■port. San Francisco International, S. P. 28 
Belford Brown, Manager PL 6-0.500 

tch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Oral L,. Moore, Gen. Mgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 

nicipal Railway, U49 Presidio Ave. Kl 6-5656 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
•sonnel i Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning, Director 
blic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
iter Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner, General Manager 

BLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
585 Bush St. 

Meet.s 1st and 3rd Thursday 
at 9 A.M. 

mk H. Sloss. President, 351 California St. 

Xavler Barrios, 2325 Ocean Ave. 
». Margaret R. Murray, 1306 Portola Drive 
lliam P. Scott, Jr., 249 Natonia St. 
quellne Smith, 2015 Steiner St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 

ilrs. Eulala Smith, Secretary 

CREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLaren Lodge, Golden Gale Park SK 1-4866 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P,M. 

Iter A. Haas. Sr., President, 98 Battery St. 

er Bercut, 1333 Jones St. 

ry Margaret Casey, 532 Mission St. 

lliam M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 
Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

s. Joseph J. Moore, Jr., 2000 Washington St. 

in F. Conway, Jr., 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell, General Manager 
Paul N*. Moore, Secretary to Commission 



EX 7-6000 
onth 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

625 Golden Gate- Ave. UN 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Everett Griffin, Chairman, 465 California St. 
James B. Black. Jr.. 120 Montgomery St. 
Jnmcs A. Folger, III, 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
Ijiwrence R. Palaclos, 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

450 Mc-Alllsler St. 



1110 1-2121 



Martin F. Wormuth. President, 41o;i I'aclie.o 
James M. Crane, 333 Monlgoiiu-ry St. 
James M. Hamlll. 120 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Die/., 2251 - 36th Ave. 
Wllliani T. Uccd, 2151 - 18lh Ave. 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA l-r.60i) 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M 
Frederic Campagnoll. President, 300 Montgomery 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Prank A. Flynn, 1549 Noriega St. 
Prentls C. Hale, Jr., 867 Market St. 
George T. Davis, 111 Sutter St. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Wilbur A. Henderson, 19 Maywood Drive 
Wilson Meyer, 333 Montgomery St. 
Guido J. Musto, 535 North Point 
Samuel D. Savad. 35 Aptos Ave. 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey, Managing Director 

E. Lawrence George, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building IIK 1-2040 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural BIdg., Embarcadero 
Raymond L. Bozzini, Commissioner 



CORONER 

S50 Bryant St. KL 3-16'.l4 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Dovle L. Smith, Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-8000, Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott, Director 

County Clerk-Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin Mongan, 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 167 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

L. J. LeGuennec, 160 Otis 

HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEnilook 1-2121, Ext. 704 
Harry I. Bigarani, 1384 York St. 
Lloyd Conrich, 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman, J. Magnin, Stockton & O'Farrell 
Frank E. Oman, 557 - 4th St. 

Bernard A. Cummings. Secretary. 254 City Hall 

Ex-Officio Members; 

K. McCarthy. Dinctor of City Planning 



J. Mu 



Urba 



Ren 



val Co-ordli 



ator 



PUBLIC HEALTH. DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry. Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home. 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

Louis A. Moran. Superintendent MO 4-1580 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. B, Albers, Superintendent Ml 8-8200 

aency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 



Earl Blake, Adn 



Supc 



HE 1-2800 



PUBLIC WORKS. DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 

Reuben H. Owens. Director 

R. Brooks I^arter, 

A.sslstant Director. Administrative 

^, Myron Tatarian 

Asst. Director. Maintenance and Uperatio 



Accc 



Bureaus 

unts, 260 City Hall 



loskoy. Supervisor 
Arcnitecture. 265 City Hall 

Charles W. Griffith. City Architect 
Buildino Inspection. 450 MiAlllster St. 

liobi-rt ('. Ijevy. .Superintendent 
Building Repair. 2323 Army 

A, H. lOkenberp. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. fM McAllister St. 

Sidney Franklin. Supervisor 
Egineerina. 359 City Hall 

Clifford J. Geerlz. City Engineer 
Sewer Repair S. Sewage Treatment, 2323 

Waller II Jon.s. Superintendent 
Street Cleaning, 2.123 Army St. 

Bern.-iril M, Crolly. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Armv St. 

P. II. liniwii. Superintendent 
Urban Renewal. 4.MI MiAllisli-r SI. 



Hi- 



ll A. 



HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

HE 1 

Army 
HE 1- 
HB 1- 

HE 1- 

IIE I- 



2121 
-2121 
■2121 

2121 
-2121 
'2121 
St. 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 

Hen Benaa, Purchaser of Supplies 

T. P. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. M. PlnluMty. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies. 16th and Harris 

J, K. l.enry. Siuiervlsor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 50 



lllle 



REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 .McAllister St. 
Philip L. Rezos. Director of Prni.crtv 
James T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr! 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 City Hall 1 

o. c. Skinner, Jr. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 



Mil 



Dii 



ctor 



CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 

THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park ba 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan., April, June, Oct 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

.Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. Honorary President, 
2 Pine St. 

.\lexander de Brettevillc, Honorary Member, 2000 
Washington St. 

Mrs. C. Tobin Clark, House on Hill, San Mateo 

William W. Mein, Honorary Member, 315 .Montgom- 
ery St. 

Mrs. Alexander Albert, 2320 Lyons St. 

loseph M. Bransten, 665 - 3rd St. 

Walter E. Buck. President. 235 Montgomery St. 

E. Raymond Armsby. Ill Sutter St. 

Louis A. Benoist. 37 Drumm St. 

Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 

Mrs. Bruce Kelham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 

Charles Mayer. San P^ranclsco Examiner 

David Pleydell-Bouverle. Glen Ellen. Calif 

John N. Ro.sekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 

William R. Wallace. Jr.. 100 Bush St. 

Whitney Warren, 111 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 

Harold L. Zellerbach. 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe. Jr., Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas, Secretary 



M. H. de 

Golde 
Meet! 



YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 
n Gate Park BA 1-2067 

1st Mon. Jan.. April. June. Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 



bunda. Hills 



Board of Trustees 
Mrs. George Cameron, Honorary Pt 

Hillsborough 
Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 
Miss Louise A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 
Sheldon O. Cooper. 620 Market St. 
Charles de Young Thieriot, 1802 F 

borough 

R. Gwin Follls. 3690 Washington St. 
Clifford V. Helmbucher. 220 Bush St. 
Grover A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 
Garrett McEnerney. II. 444 California St. 
Roscoe F. Oakes. 220 Bush St. 
Joseph O. Tobin, 1 Jones St. 
Mrs. Nlon Tucker, Burllngame Country Club 
Charles Page, 311 California St. 
Mr.s. William P. Roth, Filoll. San Mateo Co. 

Ex-Offlcio Members 
Mayor 
President, Recreation & Park Commission 

Richard Rheem. Director 

Col. Ian F. M. Macalplne. Secretary 



Robert J. Bv 



PUBLIC POUND 
2500 - 16th St. 
Charles W. Friedrlchs 



TOBER - NOVEMBER, 1962 



WATER 

I Continued from Page 51 
tunnel in Alameda County to the 
east portal of Pulgas Temple in 
San Mateo County, the estimated 
cost of the two projects being $44,- 
500.000. 

Construction of the San Joaquin 
pipeline across 47 miles of the Val- 
ley, on the same right of way 
occupied by the present two pipe- 
lines started last month. It will 
increase the aqueduct's capacity to 
about 295.000.000 gallons per day. 



and suburban customers were as- 
sured of a water rate reduction 
within a year after passage of the 
bonds. 

It didn't take a year, however, 
for the Public Utilities Commission 
to act. Less than six months after 
the election on May 1. 1962 — a 
system-wide reduction went into 
effect. By that time all of the 
wholesale customers had signed 
contracts. 

The new schedule reduced San 
Francisco water rates 6.8 per cent 
while those to the wholesale cus- 




The striking Pulga, 



Temple at Crystal Springs Lake, 
water first flowed in 1934. 



I'hcrc Hctch-Hetchy 



The fourth Bay Division pipeline 
W'hich will be under construction in 
the spring of 1963. will augment 
the transmission capacity of the 
present three pipelines — two across 
the lower bay and one around the 
south bay -which are regularly 
used to their maximum capacity. 
The new pipeline will parallel Bay 
Division Pipeline No. 3 on its right 
of way around the southerly end 
of the bay. 

Another water bond project 
scheduled for spring, 1963, con- 
struction is the $6,500,000 dam on 
San Antonio Creek in southern 
Alameda County, which will not 
only catch and store San Antonio 
Creek water but will also provide 
additional Bay Area storage for 
water from Hetch Hetchy. Even 
before the water bond proposition 
was approved by San Francisco 
voters, most of the suburban whole- 
sale customers had signed long- 
term contracts to purchase sup- 
plemental water from the Water 
Department. Firm markets for 
water sales in addition to the sale 
of the Hetch Hetchy Project's 
hydroelectric power were the basis 
for the self-liquidating feature of 
the bond proposal. It was on this 
basis, too, that both San Francisco 



tomers were reduced 5.6 per cent. 
It represented a 25-cent cut in the 
average city home owner's bill, but 
whether it meant lower bills for 
suburban householders was entire- 
ly up to the wholesalers from 
whom they purchase water. 

The difference between the re- 
duction in San Francisco and in 
the suburban area is based on the 
historical difference of about 18 
per cent between pricing of water 
sales in.side and outside the city. 

The runoff from the snowpack 
in the high Tuolumne County wat- 
ershed is the key to the operation 
of the vast Hetch Hetchy water- 
power complex. The last good wat- 
er year was 1958 when the runoff 
had been 139 per cent of normal 
and the melting snows had filled 
Hetch Hetchy reservoir to capacity. 
The next three successive years 
were dry throughout an increasing- 
ly worried California, with Hetch 
Hetchy runoffs of 62-, 69-, and 52- 
per cent of normal resulting in 
periodic curtailment of the city's 
mountain power plants. 

The situation reached its worst 

in 1961 when Lake Lloyd was for 

all practical purposes empty on 

September 1, cau.sing a five-month 

(Continued on Page 13 1 



Re-Elecl 

EDWARD M. GAFFNEY 

Assemblvnian 18th District 




EXPERIENCED - RELIA BLE - INCUMBENT 



Parker Engineering & Construction Co. 



425 FIRST STREET 



YUkon 2-8474 



SPRAYCRAFT 
AUTO PAINTING 

SPECIAL PRICES ON BODY 8c FENDER WORK 

INSURANCE WORK A SPECIALTY 
SAN FRANCISCO--'; 8 5 Bry,uU (at 4th St.) YU. 2-0281 

SMO- 16th St. (Bet, V,,lonL-.a ^Guerrero) UN, JW77' 
2030 Van Ness (Bet. Pacific 6? Jaclison) TU 5-4434* 
OAKLAND— 1 1th &? Webster. GL 1-4442* 

4921 Broadway (Bet. 49th 6? 50th) OL 4-7181 
RICHMOND— 2420 MacDon.ild (at 25th St,) BE 2-855J 
REDWOOD CITY 2601 SprinR (at Dougla.s) EM 9-4883 
7 A,M, t<i 7 P,M,. MON-FRI, 9 A.M. TO 3 P.M,. SAT 

•SUNDAY. i:-5 P.M. 



THE RECORI 



LEN HUNTER'S MOVING 

EXPRESS i TRANSFER 

State*Wide Service 

mo ORTEGA STREET 

lO. 1-2644 LO. 6-4 500 

PICKWICK 
MOTOR HOTEL 

O. C. Campbell, Mgr. 

5th 8C Mission Sts. 

San Fra 



n 



Free Orernighl Parking 
IS to Ball Park at Front Door 
Visit our Byline Coctail Lounge 



GRAND MARKET 

Be Sure lo Visit Our 
GROCERY Dept. 

14 Polk St. OR 3-1846 



ndo-CtiJna Restaurant 

Joe Jung 

26} O'FARRELL STREET 

San Francisco 



COACHMAN 

57 Powell EX 2-9903 

DINNER 

5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

Specializing in English Dishes 

glish Ale Open 7 days 

COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING 
SHOP 

Matt Spoler, Mgr. Owner 
t6 Union St. FI 6-7793 



ROBERT ALCHIAN 

fEWELER - WATCHMAKER 

Diamonds— Antiques—gifts 
»3 Taraval Street OV 1-6389 

RAYMOND Q. WONG 

NISURANCE BROKER 

Fire - Liability - Life - Auto 

-ESTERN LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

818 CLAY STREET 
Bus: GA 13975 



1' 




William F. Murray, Chief of the San Fr.i 
title of "Honorary Fire Chief" upon the H 
member of the Board of Supervisors at the 
Intermountain Association of Fire Chiefs 



o Fire Department bestows the 
.norable Mrs. Clarissa S. McMahon, 
annual banquet of the Pacific Coast 
held in San Francisco September 



17-20, 1962. The honoi was bestowed in recognition of her sincere dedication 
and service to the Department not only in an official capacity but deeply re- 
flected in her personal and humane interest of department operations and all 
its personnel. Chief Murray presented Mrs. McMahon with a solid gold "Chiefs 
Badge" and the traditional "Chiefs White Helmet." Chief Murray fcndly re- 
ferred to Mrs. McMahon as a modern "Lillie Hitchcock Coit." 

—Photo by Chet Born, S.F.F.D. 



BALYACQ 

FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Reliable Laundry Service 
116 Clement St. SK. 1-0971 



LELAND FLORISTS 

FLOWERS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

Free Delivery 

5 Leland Ave. DE 3-8493 

SAN FRANCISCO 



HOOSE OF POOLE'S 

EXCLUSIVE PLACE TO DINE 

30 Kearny St. San Francisco 

YUkon 1-3066 



OTAGIRI 

MERCANTILE CO., INC. 

OUR NEW ADDRESS 

1400 FOLSOM STREET 

Corner of 10th HE. 1-9555 



MEYERS 

19th DISTRICT 



'NO SUBSTITUTE 

FOR 
PROVEN ABILITY 
AND SENIORITY" 



EXbrok 2-1313 - Telephones - EXbrook 2-1829 

GEORGE L. BURGER 

Wholesale Dealer Potatoes and Onions 

52 VALLEJO STREET 
San Francisco 11, California 



Custom-Aire 
Products 

Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Forced Air - Gas Fired Heaters 

& Wall Furnaces 

Air Conditioning 

• 

600 Indiana Street 

VA 6-7171 



OBER - NOVEMBER, 1962 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 7) 
of the crescent moon on the hori- 
zon to tell what there's going to be 
in the way of sunshine or showers. 

While some of these signs are 
not without a small grain of truth, 
most of them are pure folk super- 
stition and of little value. 

In spite of their claiming that 
their reports are always right but 
the weather is always wrong, the 
boys over at the Weather Bureau 
are still your best bet for fore- 
telling the weather, for helping you 
to avoid a soaking or to get out 
in the sun. 

The wonderful love of a beautiful 
maid, 

The love of a staunch, true man. 
And the love of a baby, unafraid, 

Have existed since life began. 

But the greatest love, the love of 
loves. 
Even greater than that of a 
mother. 
Is the tender, passionate, infinite 
love 
Of one drunken bum for another. 

Wine and redwood have a defi- 
nite affinity, with more than 50 
per cent of all California winery 
cooperage made of redwood sup- 
plied by George Windeler Co., Ltd., 



of San Francisco, "America's wine 
capital." 

During the years immediately 
following prohibition, 1935-37, the 
company built redwood tanks for 
wineries with a total capacity of 
20,700,000 gallons, or about 63 per 
cent of all cooperage constructed 
in that period. 

Because of their long life, red- 
wood tanks are preferred by most 
California vintners for aging and 
mellowing their product, and now 
eastern producers are seeking red- 
wood tanks to replace cypress 
wood which is becoming scarce. 

Wine tanks are completely built 

by the Windeler Company, then 

knocked down and shipped with 

complete assembling instructions. 

* * * 

The internal combustion engine, 
so familiar to us all in the auto- 
mobile, had its remote beginnings 
in Europe almost three centuries 
ago. 

Back in 1678, according to the 
National Automobile Club, a 
French priest by the name of Jean 
de Hautefeuille started it all by 
proposing that they could pump 
water for the basins in the park 
at Versailles by placing a piston 
in a cylinder and driving the piston 
through the cylinder by exploding 
some gunpowder under it. Chris- 
tian Huygens, a Netherlander liv- 



ing in Paris at the time, took this 
idea and realized it in an engine 
that he built. 

Huygens, however, had an assist- 
ant by the name of Dionysius Pap- 
in who wa.s given the chore of 
cleaning the burnt gases from the 
cylinder and sought to make this 
chore easier by introducing steam 
into the cylinder and letting the 
steam contract to create a vacuum 
and pull the piston down. 

This was the principle that 
Thomas Newcomen was to use in 
England when he built so many 
engines for pumping water in the 
first half of the eighteenth century. 
And this was the principle with 
which James Watt was to quarrel 
near the end of the century, point- 
ing out and practicing the prin- 
ciple that it was better to use the 
pressure of steam than the con- 
traction of steam to drive a piston 
in a cylinder. 

Gasoline began to enter the pic- 
ture in 1860, when Jean Joseph 
Etienne Lenoir of Luxembourg 
built a successful hydrocarbon en- 
gine and, with the assistance of 
Alphonse Beau de Rochas and a 
man named Schmidt, went on to 
perfect the operations in the cyl- 
inder so that they following the 
important cycle of intake, com- 
pression, explosion, and exhaust. 
With one of these engines he drove 



a road vehicle in 1862. Five yea 
later, over in Germany, Nichol 
August Otto invented a four-cyc 
engine run on illuminating gt 
Gottlieb Daimler came along 
make this engine run on gasoli: 
in 1855, and Karl Benz set this e 
gine on a three-wheel vehicle th 
was the first vehicle to be poi 
ered by gasoline. 

In America, George Brayti 
came up with a two-cycle engi 
powered by gasoline in 1874 ai 
the Duryea brothers and Hen 
Ford made their historic mode 
in the 1890's. 

The world's tallest redwtnid tr 
is now believed to be a 368-fo 
redwood located in Humboldt Re 
wood State Park in Humhol 
County. It is four feet taller thj 
the nearby Founders' Tree, nam< 
for the founders of the .Save t 
Redwoods League, wa.s before ■ 
lost 17 feet from Its top in a stor 
a few years ago. Claims that Au 
tralian eucalyptas trees are ev 
taller have not been verified, 8 
cording to the California Redw& 
Association here. 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 
CO. 

JOSEPH RUIGOMEZ 

5715 Mission St. 

DE 3-5366 


JOHN PERRY 

Notary 
Real Estate and Insurance 

4620 Mision St. 

DE 4-5000 


PETER GIOVANZANA 

Furniture ■ Draperies ■ Carpels 

Pacific Ave. at Polk 

PR 6-1552 


Pacific Coast Rubber 
Co. 

RAY LANG 
51 Main St. EX 2-6963 


Fillmore & Ellis 
KEY SHOP 

Locksmith 

Keys Made White You Wail 

1580 Ellis St. FI 6-3817 


TOULOUSE FRENCH 
LAUNDRY 

Laundry and Cleaning 
821 Lincoln Way MO 4-1634 


PAUL WHITMARSH 

T&W 
Enameling Company 

Lacquer and Baked Knamel Fini«hea 
To Specificalion • Satiofaction Guarantfcd 
1562 Bancroft MI 8-1595 


BELFAST BEVERAGES 

640 Valencia St. 
SAN..FRANCISCO 


WilUrd Baderie*. Motor Tune-Up, Fuel 
Pumpti, Carburelori, Starters, Generatori, 
Diairtbulori, New, fcxclviriRed, Repaired 

ROY W. JOHNSON 

Aulomolire Electrician 

J9» S. V.n N... «t l^lF.. San Fr.niinc., 1 

Pl,.,nr MArkel I.6I76 


Westlake Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 

All Forms of Insurance 
36 Park Drive 
DALY CITY 



Tops Interior Decorating 

Modern Interiors 
Custom Upholstering 

See MR. MARIO 

2800 Bryant St. Mission 8-5777 



Alhambra Curtain 
Cleaners 

Curtains - Drapes - Table Cloths 

480 -5th Avenue SK 1-4128 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Casa Linda Restaurant 

MEXICAN FOOD 

AT ITS BEST 

3854 GEARY BLVD. 

SK 2-5972 



PORTOLA DRAYAGE 

FRED and LOU 

1469 Van Dyke Ave. 

MI 8-3160 



Metz Superior Doughnuts 

Wholesale ■ Retail 

1724 HaiRht St. 

BA 1-9782 



CASTRO STREET 
GARAGE 

COY MADSEN, Owner 
Complete Automotive Service 

and Repairs 

557 CASTRO, near 19th St. 

UN 1-9368 



PETE MURRAY'S 

TEXACO SERVICE 

One Stop Service 
Turk and Masonic SK 2-037 



Newman 

INSURANCE 

Agency 



581 Spruce St. BA l-640( 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Mail - A - Way Service 

PROCESSORS OF 
KODAK SERVICE 



P.O. Box 3563 Rincon Annej 
SAN FRANCISCO 19 



GRACE J. HILL 

"Custom Made Caps" 
lor All Organisations! 

170 Naples St. JU 7-614 



THE RECOI 



WATER 

(Continviod from Page 10 1 
tdown of the year-oltl Cherry 
^erhousc which is dependent on 
ce Lloyd water for its operation. 
> other powerhouse. Moccasin. 
) operated at about SO per cent 
capacity during the fall and win- 
Precipitation during Decem- 

and January indicated the grim 



Hundreds of excited spectators 
fron\ nearby Camp Mather were 
present to witness the historic mo- 
ment on Friday morning, June 22, 
when brimming Hetch Hctchy res- 
ervoir started to spill over the 
three drum gates of O'Shaughnessy 
Dam. 

By fiscal year's end, major con- 
struction was well under way on 
the Canyon power project. This 




STUART N. GREENBERG 
sident. Public Utilities Commission 
isibility of a fourth dry year. 
in a dramatic .series of storms 
ered the State in February and 
rch. leaving an above-normal 
4 per cent! snowpack on the 
rra peaks. The spring and sum- 
r sun did the rest, mothering 

melting snows down the gran- 
faced watershed to fill Lake 
yd (268,200 acre feet), Lake 
anor (27,100 acre feet), and 
tch Hetchy (360,400 acre feet). 



ORAL L. MOORE 
Chief, Hetch Hetchy 

development will take Hetch 
Hetchy water through a 10-mile 
tunnel from O'Shaughnessy Dam 
to Early Intake where it will be 
dropped to a powerhouse. When 
Canyon power goes on the line (in 
19651, its rated capacity of 67,500 
kilowatts added to Cherry's 135,000 
and Moccasin's 70,000 will increase 
the total generating capacity of 
the city's power system to 272,500 
kilowatts. 



LOU FREMY CORPORATION 

Manufacturers' Distributors 

Drugs, Cosmetics and Allied Products 

530 Ritch Street YUkon 6-4526 

SAN FRANCISCO 7, CALIFORNIA 

Solly Schuman 

CATERING COMPANY 

City Parks — Ball Parks — Stadiums — Fairs — Air Shows 

Race Tracks — Auto Races — Parties Barbecues & Other Functions 

ROSE SCHUMAN 

Fol of Van Ness Avenue at Aquatic Park 

SEabright 1-1899 San Francisco, Calif. GRaystone 4-9791 

Serving the Constructidn, Lumber &? Marine Industries 

CARPENTER RIGGING & SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

YUkon 6-4838 

25 Tehama Street 

San Francisco 5, Calif. 



Sacred Heart High School 

1075 Elli.s Street GR 4-1180 




Reelect CONGRESSMAN 
MAILLIARD 

(4th District) 
He has earned our support! 



AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES 

SPECIALIZING IN AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 

POWER BRAKES— POWER STEERING— TUNE UPS 

BILL BURRAGE — Manager, Owner 

3874- 18th Street, Near Sanchez VA 6-1949 

JAMES A. NELSON CO., Inc. 

MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 

1375 HOWARD STREET HE. 1-0140 

SAN FRANCISCO 

STATE MORTGAGE CO. 

560 KEARNY STREET DO 2-1030 

SAN FRANCISCO 

R. I SALEME CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Insurance Repairs Our Specialty 

3 376 - 18th Street 

HE 1-0341 

San Francisco 



TOBER . NOVEMBER, 1962 



BAY WI^DOW 

(Continued from Page 7 1 
point of the Oolden Week cele- 
bration was to call the city's at- 
tention to the consistently good 
performance of its transit system, 
the Muni, now completing its first 
50 years. 

When the Muni started in 1912 
it was the first public-owned tran- 
sit system in the entire country. 
Over the years the growth of the 
system has paced the growth of 
the city. Like a bellweather, the 
Muni has stretched its routes into 
undeveloped areas which have re- 
sponded with burgeoning residen- 
tial development. 

Now that both the Muni and 
San Francisco have grown to full 
size, the transit system continues, 
day in and day out, to do a really 
stand-out job in transporting its 
passengers. It moves some 670,000 
every weekday, as was pointed out 
in the August-September issue of 
CITY-COUNTY RECORD. 

In view of the low 15-cent fare 
charged, it has been estimated that 
the average San Franciscan saves 
from $30 to $.50 a month by riding 
the Muni to work instead of using 
his own car and parking in a 
downtown garage. 

Aside from economic benefits, 
also to be considered is the in- 
creasing loss of time and fraying 
of nerves that inevitably stem from 
driving a car through the frustrat- 
ing congestion downtown. 

One Muni vehicle does the trans- 
portation Job of 38 automobiles. 
And there's just so much space 
available on downtown streets. 



Where the Muni moves on schedule 
coming and going along a given 

route the autos have to stop and 

park, somewhere, .somehow. 

In short, it's smart to Ride the 

Muni the biggest bargain in San 

Francisco ! 

CAEN FOR MAYOR: It i.s our 
considered opinion that Mr. Herb- 
ert Caen of one of the local AMs 
has clearly demonstrated such out- 
standing concern for the public's 
welfare that Dobbs, McAteer and 
Shelley should do the graceful 
thing, step aside, and endorse Mr. 
Caen as the one logical choice to 
succeed Mayor George Christopher. 
( Mayor Christopher, as we all 
know and as we've been repeat- 
ing almost monotonously — will 
soon leave to join a Mr. Brown in 
Sacramento. ) 

You will recall the grand gesture 
made by Mr. Caen some weeks 
ago. With the help of a small 
army of press agents and mer- 
chants, he equipped Union Squai'e 
strollers with pigeon-proof um- 
brellas. For the first time in the 
city's history the people were safe 
from the pigeons. 

It is a testament to Mr. Caen's 
innate humanity that he cautioned 
all umbrella-users: "You are to 
hold them over your heads. It isn't 
fair to hit the pigeons with them!" 

Because of this example of the 
Broad Approach to Big Problems, 
we hereby nominate Mr. Caen for 
Mayor, on a platform of physical — 
not fiscal — reform: Construction of 
one big umbrella over San Fran- 
cisco so we'd all be safe from the 
pigeons! 




W. HARRY JOHNS 
Realtor 

322 Hayes Street 



SCHOOL OF REAL ESTATE 

Vital Legal Procedures 

Classes Monday and Tuesday 
Evenings 
REAL ESTATE 
SALES 

EXCHANGES 
RENTALS 
PROBATE 

UNderhill 3-6692 



San Francisco, California 



Enroll Now 

HILLTOP BEAUTY SCHOOL 

Hollywood Trained Instructors 

6517 Mission Street — Daly City PL 6-9877 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



E. MARTINONl CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Established 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 
EXbrook 7-2760 

iVort/i Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 

EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Newest Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational View 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-2928! 

Reasonable Rates — Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 

Thomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
Lombard 4-0180 

B.isketb.i]l, Baseb.ill. Football, Softball, Golf, Track, Tennia, Bowling 
Uniforms, Trophies &: Medals, Ski Rentals, Hunting, Fishing 

FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 

H04 TARAVAL STREET Son Francisco 16, Calif. MOntroje 11O09 

(Insist on the best) 

Superior Driving School 

Being a SUPERIOR DRIVER is the 

BEST INSURANCE you can buy! 

1322 Noriega Street LO 6-6800 

GEORGE W. REED & CO. 
MASONRY CONTRACTORS 



464 Clementina Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



YU 2-4846 



THE RECO 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




REUBEN H. OWENS, DIRECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




DECEMBER -JANUARY, 1963 



Brief History of the Firm of Abbot A. Hanks, Inc. 



The Hanks Labnialory was os- 
lablished 95 yrars apo nSB6l by 
Henry G. Hanks, whi) canu- to 
California during the gold rush 
days in 1852. He observed the 
need for the manufacture of fine 
rhemicals. reagents and paints, and 
he carried on this work in con- 
junction with the assay and chem- 
ical laboratory. Thus, it has be- 
come one of the oldest laboratories 
of its kind in the United States. 

Mr. Hanks built one of the first 
borax refineries in the State of 
California by taking the crude 
borax obtained from borax springs 
at Clear Lake. Lake County. Cali- 
fornia, and produced a refined pro- 
duct. In fact, he did so much re- 
search work on crude borax that 
the mining authorities of that day 
named a mineral occurring in bor- 
a.x deposits "Hanksite". 

Henry G. Hanks was one of the 
23 to form the Olympic Club of 
San Francisco, and was its first 
secretary. He was a member of 
the Second Vigilance Committee 
of San Francisco in the days of 
plenty of trouble with those "quick 
on the draw." and was a member 
of the Volunteer Fire Department. 
He became a member of the Geo- 
logical Society of England and the 
Royal Academy of Microscopists. 

In 1880, he became the first Cali- 
fornia State Mineralogist, and 
served in that capacity for six 
years, under appointment of Gov- 
ernor George C. Perkins. 

President Hayes commissioned 
Mr. Hanks to represent the United 
States at the Paris International 
Exposition in 1878, at which time 



the F;ifTcl Towi'r was conslnirtcil. 
and he was appointed Supcrinloncl- 
enl of the mineral exhibit of the 
United States at Paris during that 
time. 

Abbot A. Hanks, son of Henry 
G. Hanks, took over the business 
of the assay and chemical labor- 
atories in his own name in 1896; 
the chemical manufacturing end 
was discontinued. He was a mem- 
ber of many technical and other 
groups. There were less than a 
half-dozen employees in the or- 
ganization at that time. 

The laboratory played an im- 
portant part in busine.ss during 
the days of gold mining in the 
Mother Lode district in California, 
and the Comstock, Tonopah, and 
Goldfield exciting periods in Ne- 
vada. 

The San Francisco earthquake 
and fire of 1906 totally destroyed 
the Hanks laboratories, office, and 
library. Within a few weeks after 
this catastrophe, the laboratories 
were reestablished and in business 
again, and has grown steadily un- 
til it now haos appro.\imately 60 
trained personnel. At the present 
time it is the owner of more than 
20,000 square feet of modern lab- 
oratory space and auto parking 
area at 1300 Sansome Street, San 
Francisco, at the foot of Telegraph 
Hill, in which it carries on its 
metallurgical, soil foundation in- 
vestigation, spectrographic, in- 
specting and testing laboratories, 
besides the long-established a.ssay 
and chemical laboratories. 

Over the 94 years of its exist- 
( Continued on Page 12) 



Shipowners & Merchants 
Towboat Co., Ltd. 



RED STACK LINE 

Office . . . Pier 25 
San Francisco 11, California 




{save plenty wampum this winter) 

Almost every home "leaks" heat — honest Injun! ■ Some 
heat slips through loose-fitting doors and windows. About 
16% is lost through window glass. And up to 45% escapes 
through uninsulated ceilings! ■ By weather-stripping and , 
insulating now, you can prevent much of your heat loss : 
during the winter months ahead. By keeping draperies i 
drawn and the fireplace damper closed, you can stop still I 
more heat loss. ■ This way you'll have a warm, wonderful 1 
wigwam every winter . . . and save heating dollars, too ! 



J^Oam/E 



/ Electric Company 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

174S FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 3, California 

UNderhill 1-145S 

St, in Sc.im.ui 

California Tropliy and Engraving Co. 

PRospcct 6-6952 

Jewelry — Diamonds — Watches 

299 Ellis Street San Francisco 2, California 



THE RECOR< 



Fte 11 1S6J 

•AN PMkN^tMB 



bay wind. 




rT-HAT'SNEW? Well, if you're 
T not drinking a toast to 1962 
1963 or to Miss San Francisco — 
to something, anyone! — you are 
iking real hardcore news: Dur- 
r last year liquor consumption 
these sometimes loosely United 
ites soared to a record high of 
1.5 million gallons. And the Dis- 
ed Spirits Institute expects a 
np to 262 million gallons this 
ir. So if you're extended to find 
:oastee, how about the Distilled 
irits Institute — an organization 
nposed of glacial eyed gremUns 
sted, apparently, in every bar, 
■ry Martini oasis, patiently and 
elessly tabulating consumption 
their hidden pocket counters . . . 
Dr if you're not about to toast 
! DSI, how about hoisting one — 
several — to Karl M. Stuli who 
ired on January 1st from the 
iition he's held for a million 
irs, or less, as head of the S. F. 
tail Dry Goods Assn. ? During 
ent exigent years the familiar 
rd of Stockton Street learned to 
ird a Muni bus in front of his 
ice. transfer three times and 
Jht on the threshold of his Rus- 
n Hill apartment . . . 
)r perhaps you'd enjoy lifting 
ir Daniels-on-the-rocks to The 
ronicle's daily dispenser of vit- 
l-in-the-green. Mr. Charles Mc- 
bc, the fearless spectator who 
hes out with distain and eclat 



at everyone and everything from 
his delicately turned ivory tower 
on Column One in the sporting sec- 
tion , . . Mr. McCabe, who com- 
bines pedantry with misanthiophy 
to achieve an eminentl.y readable, 
albeit sadistic, result each day, is 
a kind of lineal descendent of Bob 
Patterson who wrote in similar 
vein in the Examiner during the 
pre-War days as Freddy Francisco 
. . . The erstwhile Freddp-Bob — 
or Patterson-Francisco if you will, 
or forget the whole business if you 
wish — is back in town doing a book 
about neighborhood bars! . . . 

Or how about a Campari to Law- 
rence S. Mana who, as chief assist- 
ant City Attorney for years and 
years was always reputed to be 
"the very ne.xt" judicial appoint- 
ment, finally did make it, courtesy 
of Governor Pat. As Justice John 
B. Molinari put it, after adminis- 
tering the oath: "The Mana we 
honor here is not from heaven, he's 




r-^ n 




Municipal Court and the State Dis- 
trict Appeal Court by a Governor 
who is and is our recollection ac- 
curate, Mr. Nixon?- a Democrat. 
Or a Gibson, very dry, to mark 
the enviable -if you happen to be 
a Whitaker or Nicholson or Wilkin 
or Roberts, that is- record of Hen- 
ry Alexander who within a 12- 
month span successfully piloted a 
$115,000,000 water bond issue, a 
(Continued on Page 14) 



LAWRENCE R. MANA 
New Municipal Judge 

from North Beach," thus proudly 
pegging the district genesis of both 
of them ... It was a pleasantly 
non-partisan moment: Both Mana 
and Molinari, Republicans, had 
been appointed respectively to the 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

be Magazine of Good Government 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor .ind Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

DECEMBER -JANUARY, 1965 
'OLL'ME V' NUMBER 1 



There's a BETTER way to go 

YELLOW CABS 

TUxedo 5-1234 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




^ven most lifelong residents ol 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If youVe a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
u native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citinp, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built. 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courtcoug drivcrguides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 

I')W. 

UDrives, 

Limousines, 

Charter Buses 

available 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
Yukon 6-4000 



CEMBER - JANUARY. 196} 



' -ill ,■! 



REUBEN H. OWENS 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 
City and County of San Francisco 



By DEAN ST. DENNIS 




REUBEN H. OWENS, who came to San Francisco in the 1920s for 
what was to have been a short visit, will retire April 1 as the city's 

Director of Public Works. 

He will be 65 years old on March 19 and has spent more than 35 

years in city service, but that does not mean he will be idle after 

stepping down from his city post. 

There is a good chance, he said in an interview recently, that he 

might go to work for private industry "if I got an offer I liked. But 

I certainly wouldn't take a job where I worked from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

I've been doing that too long. But I would be interested in something 

for which my talents qualify me." 
In any event, he plans to reserve 

a certain amount of time for him- 
self after retirement for golfing, 

boating, and — perhaps — a trip 

back to his native Ireland. 

Owens was born in Dublin and 

grew up there, going to high .school 

with Robert Bris<-oe, later to gain 

fame as the first Jewish Lord May- 
or of Dublin, and then obtaining 

a degree in civil engineering from 

the University of Dublin. 

He served as a lieutenant in the 

British Army in World War I — 

in the artillery — and later was an 

artillery observer in the Royal Fly- 
ing Corps, the forerunner of the 

Royal Air Force. 

It was only by chance that he 

later came to San Francisco. He 

was engaged to a girl in Dublin, 

but she and her family emigrated 

to the United States and San Fran- 
cisco because of the "troubled 
times" during Ireland's fight for 
independence. 

"So I followed her to San Fran- 
cisco," Owens said. "I just came 
out here to get married. I was 
going to stay only a year, and 
then go back to Ireland. 

"But," he added with a laugh, 
"I've never been back." He has a 
sister who still lives in Irelsind, and 
says "I'll probably take a trip back 
.some time." 

H' ind his wife. Iris, who live at 
1390 Moil icy Boulevard, have two 
sons: Desmond, an industrial engi- 
neer for IBM in San Jose, and 
Michael, a .senior and science ma- 
jor at Reed College in Portland, 
Ore. 

When Owens first arrived in Sai 
Francisco, he went to work in the 
city engineer's office and helped 
work out plans for the Alemany 
and Bay.shore boulevards construc- 
tion projects. 



REUBEN H. OWENS 
Director Public Works 



That was in 1926. But when the 
depression came, the city's work 
force was pared and he worked 
a year as a foreman in the Hetch 
Hetchy tunnels before going back 
to city hall, this time as a drafts- 
man. 

His climb up the ladder was 
steady from then on. He became 
the senior engineer with the city 
Bureau of Engineering, and in 1955 
was named city engineer. During 
thi>se years, he helped design scores 
nf projects in the city, ranging 
fioin the Broadway Tunnel to the 
fiist sewage treatment plants. 

In 1959, Owens was appointed 
Director of Public Works, and be- 
came the boss of one of the city's 
largest departments and its 1600 
employees. He also became the 
man responsible for directing all 
of the construction projects for the 
city. 

These projects have included 
sewers, work done under bond is- 
sues, streets, all school construc- 
tion — including the new Lowell 
High School — the Civic Center 
Plaza, and the $7 million rehabil- 
itation of the Civic Auditorium. 

Of all the work he has done as 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6561 

BURLINOAME, Qiliforma 



director, perhaps the most cor 
troversial has been the work tc 
ward restoration of the Palac 
of Fine Arts. 

"We're now preparing the fins 
plans for it," Owens said. "The 
will be ready about the time I r« 
tire." The controversy arose whe 
the Palace of Fine Arts League ha 
estimated the restoration could b 
done for $5.8 million, and a sui 
vey by Owens' office showed i 
would cost $12 million. 

Some of the work originall 
planned may not be done now, bu 
Owens said he believed in look 
ing on the bright side. 

"When the bids for the worl 
come in this fall, maybe they'll b 
lower than we think. And mayb 
someone will give more money fo 
the project." 

In 1960, Owen's department alS' 
was given the job of handling al 
engineering for the Recreation an: 
Park Department. "This adds i 
few more chores," he said. On 
of the big jobs thus inherited wil 
be construction of the new yach 
basin planned in the Marina. 

The Department of Public Work 

here embraces nine bureaus whicl 

are vital to the smooth operatioi 

of the city. They include the bu 

( Continued on Page 10 ) 



A Western Beauty 
School Graduate 

is found in tlie smartest 
Beauty Sliops 

UNEXCELLED TRAINING 

Skilled Instructors 
Latest Methods 

Bernice M. Markee, Owner-Manager 

Western Beauty 
School 

2595 Mission at 22nil AT 2-1709 



THE RECORC 



Around and About 



ISy WHIT HENRY 

( Whit Henry, who for many years has brightened the pages of the 
;ity-County Record with his fine writing, has suffered a heart attack, 
llthough Whit is well on the road to recovery, it will be some time 
lefore he will be able to resume his column. Until Whit returns, his 
olumn will be written by some of his many friends. ) 

By Winsor .Joswiyn, Gui^sl Columnist for "Whit" Henry 



"Win, what was Carmel like in 
tie early days?" 

Whit. I'm glad you asked that 
uestion. I didn't get there until 
915. The really early days began 
t the turn of the centuiy when 
levelopers Devendorf and Powers 
lid out a square mile of north- 
juth. east-west streets running 
phill from the crescent of white 
each and called it Carmel-by-the- 
ea. I'll tell you some of the things 

remember, however, during my 
wn carefree era after the Exposi- 
on Year. 

You got to Monterey on the 
outhern Pacific and then by horse 
;age driven by Sam Powers over 
he Hill. If there were a lot of 
ders and the horses tired, Sam 
■ould ask the men to get off and 
'alk . . . maybe to push a little. 
am used to do small shopping in 
[onterey for pioneer Carmelites, 
len would cheerfully drive along 
le forest lined roads delivering a 
X)Ol of thread here, and a frying 
an there. 

"I've driven stage over the tops 
■ those trees on Ocean Avenue," 
; recalled in later years. Of course 
le trees were at first only a foot 
gh. 

Ocean Avenue, along which the 
agon and auto tracks meandered, 
as called Grand Cemyon because 
' its storm-washed ruts. Harrison 
odwin, now owner of the sumptu- 
is Pine Inn, did a cartoon showing 
iveral blocks of this rugged road 
id sold it for 15 cents a copy at 
oc Beck's drug store at Ocean and 
in Carlos streets. Tourists who 
irvived the crashing trip through 
le village artery bought this card 
I "Zip", as Harrison was known 
the Los Angeles newspaper 
orld, instead of shopworn colored 
)stals, such as the one of bathing 
lis and boys titled "This is my 
leed bunch." 

Mail got to Carmel via Postmas- 
r Louis Slevin's combined sta- 
onery store and postoffice on 
:ean Avenue. "I bought six lock 
pxes for mail," he said, "hoping to 
ing more customers into my 
ore. It took a long time to rent 



them, as people came in and asked 
for mail as you would in general 
delivery. It really looked like a bad 
investment." Louie was a photogra- 
pher who amassed a matchless col- 
lection of really early shots. Today 
the postoffice may have a thousand 
times that number of boxes and 
perhaps even a waiting list of 
users. Today, as then, there are no 
house numbers in town. People 
still come to the postoffice to greet, 
gabble and gripe. 

Telegrams came by scratchy tele- 
phone calls from the station at 
Monterey to Fred Wermuth, truck- 
er and warehouseman. When he got 
several telegrams on hand he would 
drive around delivering them, give 
or take a day or so to make a col- 
lective delivery. 

Haircuts were dispensed by burly 
Mickey the Barber in a tiny cabin 
on Ocean Avenue alongside where 
the Bank of Carmel was later built. 
One working chair, two loafing 
chairs and an oil stove and Mick- 
ey's place was a news center and 
place to stop for a chat. In 1915 
Bill Overstreet started the weekly 
Pine Cone, sometimes nicknamed 
(Continued on Page 15) 



DICK CHIN 
Realtor 

Specializing in 
Business & Residential Property 

Real Estate and Insurance 
813 CLAY STREET EX 7-3255 



Modern Launder-Eze & 
Cleaning 

Complete Washing and Dry Cleaning 
Service 

2849 BAKER ST. 

JO 7-2100 

Harry Underwood, Owner 



E. MAKTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Established 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 
EXbrook 7-2760 

San Francisco Auction Gallery, Inc. 



Member, Appraisers' Association of An 

2001 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, California 

Telephone: PRospect 6-5566 

ANTIQUES FURNITURE - PAINTINGS 

ART OBJECTS - JEWELRY 

HARRISON HOUSE - "South of Market" 

Nencsl and Finest Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

Luncheons II a.m. - 3 p.m. Dinner 5:30-9:30 p.m. (Friday only 
(Seafood our Specialty) 

401 - 6th St., Cor. Harrison DO 2-?489 

Around the Corner from the "Hall of Justice" 



F. FRAGOMENA & SONS 

Woolworth Poultry and Delicatessen 

Corner of Powell and Market Streets 
San Francisco, California 

anderson and perkins, inc. 

specialized collection service 

31 Geary Street 
San Francisco 8 
Phone EXbrook 2-8466 



ECEMBER . JANUARY, 1963 



EMPLOYEE fREDIT UNIONS GROW 

By VIKtilL L. ELLIOTT 

EMPLOYEE CREDIT UNIONS among City and County workers 
have mushroomed dining the past decade into a multi-million 
dollar savings and loan service, with eight such organizations having 
assets totaling more than $10,000,000. 

Some 13.000 municipal employees today own nearly $6,000,000 in 
share deposits in their credit unions, which are making about 7.500 
loans annually. Loans have totaled 
$37,900,000 since the eight were or- 
ganized at different times in tl- 
early fifties. All profits arc i . 
turned to the shareholder menihn -. 
at year's end in the foi-m of di\i- 
dends. 

The two largest are opeiateil 
by and for police and firemen. The 
Firemen's Credit Union, started in 
1951. claims a membership of over 
3.500. The Police Credit Union has 
3,400. and has been increasing by 
400 annually. Each has loaned out 
about $11,000,000 since being stni t- 
ed, and each has assets in exi i -s 
of $3,000,000. Also, each makLS 
about 1,600 loans to members every 
year. 

Next comes the Municipal Em- 
ployees Credit Union, with 2,900 

members, and assets exceeding ,,„.-, ,j„„ . ... 

$1,100,000. It makes more loans '"^"^^er, age 50. has $1,500 in has 
per year-l,900-than any of the savings account. In event of his 
^ ^ ■' death, the estate receives $3,000 — 




VIRGIL L. ELLIOTT 
Director Finance 3C Records 

posit is made. An example: A 



others. 

The Municipal Railway Em- 
ployee Credit Union has 1,500 
members, and makes 1,700 loans 
annually. The Recreation and 
Parks Credit Union, with 650 mem- 
bers, has loaned a total of $1,000,- 
000 since 1954. 



the amount on deposit plus a like 
amount. 

To put it in the words of Sal 
Guiliano, treasurer-manager of the 
Municipal Railway Employee.s 
Credit Union, main benefits of the 
Credit Unions are the loan protec- 
tion, share holding insurance and 
Rounding out the picture are the annual dividend. He adds: 



credit unions operated for the Fed- 
erated Teachers, Municipal Rail- 
way Shopmen and Police Post 456. 
Why credit unions? What ac- 
counts for their amazing growth? 



"We try to encourage our mem- 
bers, who average $300 in share 
holdings each, to save as they bor- 
row. I go along with the Credit 
Union creed: 'Save Regularly, Bor- 



In what ways are their services row Wisely, and Pay Back Prompt- 
more attractive than are those of ly.' ALso. the Credit Union stand 
commercial banks and -savings and of: 'Not for Charity, Not for Pro- 
loans lending in.stitutions ? fit. But for Service'." 

First off. members are partici- In the Police Credit Union, the 

pating shareholders with voting average share balance is $795, and 

rights. Credit is not difficult to the current 2,000 loans average 

establish since all borrowers are $1,560. Interest rate is % of 1 per- 

al.so City and County employees, cent monthly on the unpaid bal- 

Interest rates are reasonable, and ance. Dividend rate is 4V2 per- 

thc loan is automatically "paid in cent per annum, paid semi-annu- 

full" in event of the borrower's ally. 

death or permanent disability. Harry C. Vakiespino, treasurer- 
Loan payments and deposits can manager, points to $30,000 paid to 
be made through payroll deduc- members in 1962 Christmas Club 
tion. savings. His Credit Union, as does 

Credit Unions are operated as the Recreation-Park one. keep the 

non - profit organizations, with membeis informed through a reg- 

member-shareholders receiving an- ularly published newspaper. He 

nual dividends ba.sed on earnings adds: 

Share deposits also provide life "Payroll deduction has made 
insurance which varies according po.ssible systematic savings never 
to various conditions including the previously undertaken. Debt con- 
age of the member when the de- ( Continued on Page 13) 



WESTLAKE INSURANCE AGENCY 

All Forms of Insurance 

36 PARK PLAZA DRIVE - DALY CITY 

WALTER F. BRODIE, Manager | 

Telephone PLaza 5-71 1 3 Residence Phone Montrose 4-ilHH 

Sunset Scavenger Corp. 

Rubbish Hauling and B asement Cleaning 

Foot of Tiinnell Ave. & Beatty Road, Bayshore 

JU 6-7500 

JOE'S TEXACO SERVICE 

COMPLETE ONE-STOP SERVICE 

OPEN 24 HOURS 

98 OCEAN AVE — JUniper|5-3495 — SAN FRANCISCO 



EAGLESON 
ENGINEERS 



615 Sansome Street 
San Francisco 11, California 



THE RECORI 



WINES OF CALIFORNIA 



I dinner wine nevei- stands still. 
s constantly developing; minute 
inges are taking place. This is 
I to the yeasts, acids, solids and 
er components that remain in 
wine. 

ohn Townsend Trowbiidge. the 
lerican author and poet, said; 
ith age a richer life begins; the 
rit mellows; ripe age gives tone 
iriolins. wine and good fellows." 

n producing dessert wines, fer- 
itation is arrested before all the 
ural sugar has been converted. 
is done by introducing brandy 
ch in many cases is from the 
eiy's own distiller.v. The fifinal 
duct is 19. ."5-20 per cent alcohol. 

park a canned chocolate sundae 
li a little California Sherry. Or 
^e the sauce waini over coffee 
cream spooned on canned pear 
^es. Use a little rich-flavored 
rry in making chocolate icing 
your best layer cake. 

:ow cold should a wine be 
red? This is a moot question, 
general rule is that drier wines 
Jld be served colder than the 
et. No wine should be chilled 
iw 42 degiees. 

[artin Luther, German religious 
■rmer. had this to say about 
e: "Who loves not women, wine 
song, remains a fool his whole 
long." 

'hether a wine cellar is below 
jnd or in the closet of an apart- 
it. it should be dry and, if pos- 



sible, ventilated. The cellar should 
be away from a heating plant or 
hot water unit. 

The greatest single influence up- 
on wine has been the church. De- 
velopment of the vine has accom- 
panied the spread of Christianity. 

The wine list is as an important 
silent salesman for wine as the 
menu is for food. It should always 
be presented to a guest along with 
the menu. 

California Sparkling Burgundy is 
a sparkling wine produced in the 
same way as Champagne but with 
red instead of white wine. It is 
usually semisweet. 

Wine, because it continually 
changes in quality even after bot- 
tling, has never had an industrv- 
wide quality grading system as 
have many other products. 

The Spanish explorer, Balboa, is 
credited with introducing the 
choice EiU'opean wine grapes of the 
Vitis Vinifera Species into the New 
World, 

Mulled wine, hot and fragrant, 
is a pleasant party beverage for 
cool evenings. To make it, dissolve 
a cup of sugar in four cups of wat- 
ei'. Add the peel of half a lemon 
and 18 whole cloves; boil for 15 
minutes, then strain. Add two 
( 4 5 quai't ) bottles of California 
Burgundy or Claret and heat gent- 
ly. Do not boil. Serve hot in pre- 
heated mugs or cups with a cinna- 
mon stick as a stirrer. 



^ail • A - Way Service 

PROCESSORS OF 
KODAK SERVICE 

O. Box 3563 Rincon Annex 

SAN FRANCISCO 19 



FRED G. AINSLIE 

Real Estate & Insurance 
Notary Public 
46 Polk St. OR 3-7400 



STELU PASTRIES 

For ALL OCCASIONS 

Cjkcs - Pastries - Cuokit, 

446 Columbus Ave. 



Roland H. Osterberg 

DIAMONT) SIHTER 
OcMn Ave. JU 4-8<>50 



The WHITE 
MOTOR CO. 

5th SC Brannan Sts. 
SAN.FRANCISCO 



UKRANIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 

JU. 4-2601 

857 GIRARD STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

John Ostrat Co., Inc. 

Engraving 

156 -2nd STREET 
GA. 1-6670 



GOLDEN PRINTING CO. 

.All Types 'il Pnntini; 

1492 EDDY STREET 

FI. 6-524 3 



Marsh & McLeivivax- 

COSGROVE &e. COMl'AIVY 

Insurance Brokers 

CONSULTING ACTUARIES 
AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 

One Bush Street ' San Francisco 
523 Central BIdg. • Oakland 

Chicaiin, New York, San Franci.ico, Minncapolifi , Detroit, 
Lo.v Attaelm. Boaton, St. Louis, Philadelphia, Pitt.ibur(ih. 
Srn.ttlr. IiiitUiniiimlis.. St. Paul. Portland. Kuffahi, Duluth. 
Tul.sa. Atlanta. Miatni. Nmv Orleans. Mihraukrr. Phoenix. 
Cleveland, Kalmazoo, Charlciton, Oakland, San Diei/o, 
Richmond, Montreal, Toronto, Vancoui>er, Calijai-y, Ed- 
monton, Winnipet/, Caraca.s, London — ivith repre.tentation 
also in other parts of Central and South America, Europe, 
South Africa and Australia. 



BENZINGER 
BROS., INC. 

CHURCH GOODS 
RELIGIOUS GIFTS 
RELIGIOUS BOOKS 

758 MISSION STREET 
Telephone SU 1-5159 



COURTESY 
SERVICE 
GARAGE 



Tune-Dp 

Transmission 

Brakes 



261 - 3rd Avenue 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 

Gene Gamachc 
Tel. WVman 2-3681 



Jose de los Reye. 

Philippine Commercial Attache 

World Trade Center 

San Francisco 



BUSH'S SANDWICH SHOP 

Breakfast - Lunch - Short Orders 

240 KEARNY ST. 

GA 1-6948 



Italian Village Foods 

Groceries • Mc.il^ • Delicatessen 

Wines &• Liquors 

490 Columbus Avenue 

GA 1-1798 



The BUNKER 

RESTAURANT and 

TEE ROOM 

Lounge 

For Reservatio"s Call. 

Gene Zerga-WY 2-5157 

CYPRESS HILLS 

GOLF COURSE 

Hillside Blvd., Colma 

A Country Club for the fubiic 

GOOD FOOD 

Bre.ikf.ist — Lunch — Dinner 



:ember-j.\nuary. iy6J 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 City Hall MA 1-0163 

GforiH' Christopher. Mayor 

.lohn P Sullivan. E.xocutivo Sorrptary 
Rnticrt .M. Smalley. Condilpntlal Secretary 
MarKaret Smith. Personal Secretary 
.lohn I.. Monlz. Administrative Assistant 
Robert Rockwell. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

23B Cltv Hall "E 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 
Peter Tamaras. President. 1020 Harrison 
William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 
RoKcr Roas. 2323 Geary St. 
.loseph M. Casev, 252S Ocean Ave. 
Harold S. Pobbs. 351 California St. 
Or Charles A. Rrtola. 253 Columbus Ave. 
.lohn J. Ferdon. 1S5 Monteomery St. 
.Tames I,. Hallev. S70 Market St. 
Clarl.ssa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 
.lack Morrison. 2.^00 Creenwich St. 
.Toseph E. TInney. 2517 Mission St. 

Robert .1, Do1an. Clerk 

IJIIlan M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development— Boas, Blake. 

County Stale and National Affairs — Ferdon. Dobbs. 

McMahon „ „, , 

Rducatlon, Parks and Recreation— Ertola. Blake. 

Finance. Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs, Ferdon, 
Halley 

.Tudiciary. LeKislatlve and Civil Service — Tinney, 
McMahon. Morrison 

Police — Casev. Ertola. Tinney 

Public Buildings. Lands and City Planning— Mor- 
rison. Boas. TInnev 

Public Health and Welfare— McMahon. Halley. Mor- 

Public l.Uilities— Halley, Dobbs. Ferdon 
Streets and Highways — Blake. Boas. Ertola 
Itules— Tamaras. nobbs. Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall KL, 2-131C 

Russell Ia Wolden 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

SSil Brvant St. 
Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDIER 

.srill Hrywnt St. 
Edward T. Mancuso 



SHERIFF 






331 City Hall 




HE 1-2121 


Matthew C. Carbeny 






TREASURER 






IV) Olty Hall 




HE 1-2121 


John J. Goodwin 






COURTS 


SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 






Fourth Floor, City Hall 




UN 1-8552 


Raymond J. Arata 


Francis 


Mccarty 


Carl H. Allen 


Edward Molkenbuhr 


Byron Arnold 


Clarence W. Morris 


John W. Bussey 


Harry J 


Neubarth 


Walter Carpenetl 


Haymon 


1 J, O'Connoi 


C. Harold Caulfleld 


Edward 


F. ODay 


M(;lvvn r. Cronin 


Charles S. Peery 


Norn.un Klkington 


George W. Schonfeld 


Timothy I Fi'zpatrlck 


William 


F. Traverso 


Joseph Karcsh 


Alvin E 


Weinberger 


Gerald S. Ixvin 


H. A. VI 


n der Zee 


Joseph M. Cummins, Secretary 




480 City Hall 




UN 1-8552 



MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall KL, 2-3008 

Andrew J. Eyman. Presiding LelanJ J. Lazarus 
Albert A. Axelrod claremoA. Linn 

Emmet Daly George "J. Malone; 

Robert J. Drewis William .\. OBrlei 

Bernard I!. Cllckfeld LenoreD. Underwood 

Clayton W. Horn Jamea J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon. Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-3008 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

.S50 Bryant St. KL 2-3008 

James Leddv. Chiff Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

4.-.7 City Hall UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
William McDonnell. Foreman 
Dr. Donald Schulz. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

SSO Bryant St. KL 3-nill 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman, 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser. 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 39n Fremont St. 
W^illiam Moskovitz. 5030 Geary Blvd. 
Robert .\. Peabodv. 456 Post St. 
Adolph L. Plerotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 

JUVENILE COURT 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5740 

Hon. .Milvvn 1. Cronin, Pnsiding Judge 
Thomas F. Strycula. Chief probation (.ifficer 

JUVENILE JUSTICE COMMISSION 

Meets 2nd Thursday of month; 1:00 P.M. 

375 Woodside Avenue 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 71t New Montgomery St. 
Reverend Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
Reverend John A. Collins. 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Reverend James B. Flynn. 1825 Mission St. 
ML-is Mvra R. Green. 1362 - 30th Ave. 
.Mrs. Horace Gulttard. 3871 Jackson St. 
.\lr. Tliomas J. Lenehan. 501 Haight St. 
.Mr. William M. Reedy. 55 Fillmore St. 
.Mrs. iMathew O. Tobriner. 3494 Jackson St. 
Dr. Philip R. Westdahl, 490 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2S9 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook. Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean 

940 - 26th St. N.W., Washington. D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator. Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkln HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 

Bernard C. Begley. M.D., 460 Sutter St. 

Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 

Nell Sinton, 1020 Francisco St. 

John K. Hagopian, 220 Bush St. 

Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 

Betty Jackson, 2835 Vallejo St. 

William E. Knuth. 1600 Holloway Ave. 

Joseph Esherick, 2065 Powell St. 

Burton L. Rockwell, 1019 Market St. 

Ex-Offlcio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
Pi'esldent, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



HE 1-21 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 I.,iirkln St. HE 1 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 

Gardner W. Mein. Pres., 315 Montgomery Si 

Louis Mark Cole, 1968 Vallejo St. 

James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 

Mrs. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 

George Thomas Rockrlae. 405 Sansome St. 

AlvIn H. Baum. Jr.. 14 Montgomery St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller. Secretary 
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Hubert J. Sober. President, 155 Montgomery St. 
Richard C. Ham. Vice Pres., 200 Bush St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick, 827 Hyde St. 

George J. Grubb, Gen. Mgr. of Personnel 

DISASTER CORPS 

850 Bryant St. KL 3-l( 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.). Director 
Alex X. McCausIand. Public Information Officer 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

136 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-41 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 
170 Fell St. 

Samuel Ladar. President. Ill Sutter St. 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper. Jr.. 10 Walnut St. 
Adolfo de Urloste. 612 Van Ness Ave. 
Edward Kemmitt, 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Claire Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 
James E. Straiten. 800 Presidio Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt. of Schools and Sec 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall UN 1-81 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 

Dr. Peter .\ngel. President. 1S67 - 15th Ave. 

Charles R. Greenstone. 182 Second St. 

Philip Dindia. 536 Bryant St. 

William F. Murray. Chief of Department 
Albert B. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

460 McAllister St. HE 1-2: 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Frank J. Collins. President. 2614 - 16th Ave. 

George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 

Donald M. Campbell. M.D., 977 Valencia St. 

Donald J. JlcConk, 220 Montgomery St. 

Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Robert E. Hunt, Claims Supervisor 
Lyle J. O'Connell, Executive Director 

Ex-Officio Members 
Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 
HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3-5! 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Jacob Shemano. Chairman. 130 Montgomery St. 
John E. Gurich, 300 Montgomery St. 
Solomon E. Johnson. 704 Market St. 
T. Kong Lee. 715 Sacramento St. 
Joseph P. Mazzola, 1621 Market St. 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

45(1 McAllister .St. HE 1-2 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 
David Thomson. Chairman. 65 Berry St. 
Arthur S. Becker. 3475 California St. 
Donald .Magnin. 77 OKarrell St. 
G. Baltzer Peterson. 2910 Vallejo St. 
John E. Sullivan. 69 West Portal Ave. 

VIning T. Fisher. Diri-ctor 

Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 
Cohen, lA^gal Counsel 



ERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

227 City Hall 

Moots ovory Wednosdny at S:nO P M. 
'Illlalii H. H. HiiviH. ProsldiTil. \IM l-'ols. 
Koice Olllln. 4091 - 19th Avo. 



Mo 



larenco J. Walsh. 2450 - 17th St. 

most Ij. West, 265 MontKomory 

J. Kdwin Mattox. Execullvo ^ 



St. 



SLICE COMMISSION 

S.'.n Hryanl Stroot Kl, :i-ir,ll7 

Meets eveiy Monday at 6:00 P.M. 
itil A. BisslnBer, President, 415 San-somo St. 
arold H. MoKlnnon, 255 ("allfornia St. 
jn Kazaekorloy. 851 Howard St. 

Thomas J. Cahill, Chief of Police 
Alfred J. Nelder, Deputy Chief of Police 
I. Thomas Zaragoza. Director of Traffic 
Capt. Daniel P. McKiem, Chief of Inspectors 
L.t. Wm. ,1. O'Rrien. Comml.sslon Secretary 
Capt. John T. Butler, Department Secretary 

UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center HK l-212t 

Meets 1st Tuesday of month at 3:30 P.M. 



lorn a 



Wu. n.D.S.. President 

jhn M. Pransten. 665 - 3rd St. 

', Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 

Me M. Fanucchi, 1445 Stockton St. 

ortimer Fleishhacker. .Ir., 601 California 

ariiaret V. Girdner. 2130 Pulton St. 

Jward E. Heavey, 6.S Post St. 

nton K. T-epotlch. 1655 Polk Street 

rs. J. Henrv Mohr, 2 Castenada Ave. 

ev. William' Turner, 1642 Broderick St. 

Lee Vavuris. 990 Geary St. 
William R. Hoiman. Librarian 
Frank A. Clarvoe, Jr.. Secretary 

UBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall 1 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

.uart N. Greenbers. President. 765 Folsor 

jrt Simon, 1350 Folsom St. 

eorge F. Hansen, 215 Market St. 

homas P. White, 400 Brannan St. 

lomas F. Stack. 703 Market St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood, Manager of Utiilt 
James J. Finn, Secretary to Com—'—' 



:ion 



HE 1-2121 



-0500 



Bureaus and Depart) 
jcounts, 2S7 City Hall 

George Negri, Director 
irport. San Francisco International, S. P. 

Belford Brown. Manager 1 

Btch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Oral L. Moore, Gen. Mgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 
unicipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5056 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
Brsonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning, Director 
ilblic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
'ater Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner. General Manager 

JBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

5S5 Bush St. EX 7-6000 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday each month 
at 9 A.M. 
rank H. Sioss, President. 351 California St. 
:. Xavier Barrios, 2325 Ocean Ave. 
rs. Margaret R. Murray. 1306 Portola Drive 
'llliam P. Scott, Jr.. 249 Natoma St. 
icqueiine Smith. 2015 Steiner St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Uulala Smith, Secretary 

ECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge. Golden Gale Park SK 1-4866 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 

alter A. Haas. Sr., President. 98 Battery St. 

iter Bercut, 1333 Jones St. 

ary Margaret Casey. 532 Mission St. 

'llliam M. Coffman. 525 Market St. 

r. Francis J. Herz. 450 Sutter St. 

r«. Joseph J. .Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washington St. 

>hn F. Conway. Jr.. 311 California St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
Paul N. Moore. Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gate Avo. UN 3-7750 

Moots every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Everett Griffin. Chairman. 465 California St. 
Jamos 11. Biack. Jr . 120 Montgomery St. 
.lames A. Folgor. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. S36 Market St. 
Ijiwronco R. Palaclos. 356 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann. Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

•ir.n McAliistor St. HE 1-2121 

.M,.,.|s ovory Wi'iinosday at 2 P.M. 
.lainos .M. llaiiiiii. President, 120 Montgomery St. 
.iHinos M. Crane, 333 Montgomery St. 
naniei A. Diez, 2261 - 36th Ave. 
William T. Reed, 2151 - 18th Ave. 
Martin F. Wormuth. 4109 Pachoco 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building MA 1-6600 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Ralph J. Stern, President. 305 Clay St. 
Frank A. Flynn, Vice President, 1649 Noriega St 
Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 
Philip S. Boone, 343 Sansome 
Fred Campagnoli. 300 Montgomery St. 
George T. Davis, 111 Sutter St. 
Prontis C. Hale. 867 Market St. 
.Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
Harold E. Hubbard. 6100 Geary Blvd. 
Wilson Mover, 333 Montgomery St. 
Sanuiol n. Sayad, 35 Aptos Ave. 

Edward Sharkey, Managing Director 

H. Lawrence George, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2040 

George Culler, Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



KL 3-1694 



HE 1-2121 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Raymond L. Bozzini, Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 

Frank J. OConneil, Market Master MI 7-9423 

CORONER 

850 Bryant St. 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue 
D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Dovle L. Smith, Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-8000, Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hail 
Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk-Recorder 

Martin Mongan, 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator 

Cornelius S, Shea, 375 City Hail 
Registrar of Voters 

Charles A. Rogers, 156 City Hail 



HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



HOUSING APPEALS BOARD 

HEniiock 1-2121, Ext. 704 
Harry I. Bigarani. 1384 York St. 
Lloyd Conrich, 45 - 2nd Street 
Edward Dullea, 333 Montgomery 
Walter Newman. J. Magnin. Stockton & OFarrell 
Frank E. Oman. 567 - 4th St. 

Bernard A. Cummings. Secretary, 254 City Hail 

Ex-Officio Members; 

James R. McCarthy. Director of City Planning 

Irwin J. Mussen. Urban Renewal Co-ordinator 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox, Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
.Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou. Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

l.<]uis A. Moran. Superintendent MO 4-1580 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. E. Aihers, Superintendent MI 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake, Adm. Superintendent HE 1-2800 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hail HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens. Director 

R. Brooks Larter. 

Assistant Director. Administrative 

S. Myron Tatarian 

Asst. Director. Maintenance and Operations 



Bur««u* 

Accounts, 260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

J. J. McCloskey, Supervisor 
Architecture. 266 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 450 .MiAillslor St. HE 1-2121 

Robert I'. Ix>vy. Superintendent 
Building Repair. 2323 Army HE 1-2121 

A. IT. Ekonberg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. 450 McAllister St. HE 1-2121 

Sidney Franklin, Supervisor 
Egineering. 359 City Hail HE 1-2121 

f-llffnrd J. Goortz. Cilv Engineer 
Sevyer Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army St. 

Waiter H. Jcnos. Sulxrintendent HE 1-2121 

Street Cleaning. 2323 Army St. HE 1-2121 

Charles .MiFadden. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. HE 1-2121 

F. D. Brown, Superintendent 
Urban Renewal, 4,50 .McAilisler St. HE 1-2121 

Bernard A. Cummings. Analyst 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hail HE 1-2121 

Bon Henas, Purchaser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purcha.sor of Supplies 
Central Shops, SOO Quint 

A. M. Flaherty, Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harrison Sts. 

J. K. Loary. .Suoervlsor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 60 

Gonrgo Stanley, Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 McAllister St. he 1-2121 

Philip Ij. Rezos, Director of Property 
James T. Graham. Auditorium Mgr! 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS A MEASURES 

6 City Hall HE 1-2121 

O. C. Skinner, Jr. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 



CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 

THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-6610 

Meets 2nd Monday, Jan.. April, June. Oct. 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckeis. Honorary President. 
2 Pine St. 

Alexander de Bretteville, Honorary Member. 2000 
Washington St. 

Mrs. C. Tobin Clark, House on Hill, San Mateo 

William W. Mein, Honorary Member, 315 Montgom- 
ery St. 

Mrs. Alexander Albert, 2320 Lyons St. 

Joseph M. Bransten, 665 - 3rd St. 

Walter E. Buck. President, 235 Montgomery St. 

B. Raymond Armsby, 111 Sutter St. 

Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 

Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 

Mrs. Bruce Kelham. 15 Argueilo Blvd. 

Charles Mayer, San Francisco Examiner 

David Pleydell-Bouverle, Glen Ellen. Calif. 

John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomerv St. 

William R. Wallace, Jr.. 100 Bush St. 

Whitney Warren, 111 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 

Harold L. Zellerbach, 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howo, Jr., Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas, Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. April, June. Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. George Cameron, Honorary President, 
Hillsborough 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Miss Louise A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

.Sheldon G. Cooper, 620 Market St. 

Charles de Young Thierlot. 1802 Florlhunda. Hills- 
borough 

R. Gwin Follis, 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Heimhucher. 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 

Garrett McEnorney. 11. 444 California St. 

Roscoo F. Oakos. 220 Bush St. 

Joseph O. Tobin. 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burlingame Country Club 

Charles Page. 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Fiioii, San Mateo Co. 
Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation & Park Commission 
Richard Rheem. Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalplne. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

436 Ciiy Hail HE 1-2121 

Robert J. Evorson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 
2600 - 16th St. 
Charles W. Frledrichs. Exe 



ECEMBER - JANUARY. 1963 



owE^s 

( Continued from Page 4 1 
reaus of engineering, building in- 
spection, accounts, centi'al permits. 
street repair, sewer repair and sew- 
age treatment, and street cleaning 
and tree planting. 

With so many bureaus, there is 
bound to be some criticism from 
the public, and Owens said some 
persons have complained recently 
about delays in obtaining building 
permits. 

One thing the critics may not 
understand, he said, is that build- 
ing permits have to be approved 
by the Department of City Plan- 
ning, the Department of Public 
Health, and the Fire Department. 

"These checks and balances are 
put on in order to protect the pub- 
lic. These operations talte time." 

Tho.se who complain, he added, 
might do well to take a look at the 
way things were some years ago 
in the city government. 

Prior to 1932, when Civil Serv- 
ice was instituted, the public works 
in San Francisco were handled by 
the old Board of Public Works — 
whose three commissioners were 
appointed. 

"Things were a little free and 
easy then." Owens said. 

"But." he added, "since 1932, the 
department has been completely 
free of politics. The charter limits 
the Board of Supervi.sors' interefer- 
ence with the administration of the 
department. 

"The department is entirely free 
of politics, which is an excellent 
thing. It makes it much easier to 
be honest. 

"Now we don't have to do favors 
for people. We don't do favors. 
We give everyone the same treat- 
ment. San Francisco has a very 
good government. 

"When you put in controls you 
naturally have red tape. The peo- 
ple's money goes where it's meant 
to go. Criticism of the red tape is 
foolish — because you have to have 
good controls," Owens said. 

Owens and his department have 



tremendous responsibilities. The 
department has an annual average 
budget of $23 million- in addition 
to another $4 million a year ex- 
pended from bond issue revenues 
for construction and maintenance 
projects. 

One of his department's func- 
tions which is most noticable is 
done by the Bureau of Street 
Cleaning and Tree Planting. This 
bureau has planted thousands of 
trees itself, and in addition issued 
the permits- -and gave suggestions 
—for the 25,000 trees planted here 
in the last three years by individ- 
uals and business firms. 

This is one non-controversial 
area, he said, for the department 
has issued thousands of brochure.'; 
with tips on how to plant trees 
properly and what trees do the 
best in San Francisco's climate. 

In reflecting on his long tenure 
in city government, Owens said: 
"These have been very satisfying 
years. Very interesting. San Fran- 
cisco has been very good to me." 

But perhaps one of his favorite 
memories of the past few years has 
no relation to the city govern- 
ment. 

In 1956, the University of Dublin 
selected Owens to be its represent- 
ative in the academic procession 
which marched on charter anni- 
versary exerci-ses which honored 
Robert Gordon Sproul on his 25th 
year as president of the Univer- 
sity of California. 

Owens' place in the procession 
was just in front of the president 
of Harvard University. 

He was in the same position — 
again in front of Harvard — when 
the University of Dublin selected 
him to represent it at the installa- 
tion of Robert Kerr as the Uni- 
versity of California's president in 
1958. 

"I've walked in front of Harvard 
University twice in the academic 
procession." Owens said. "If Ken- 
nedy ever represents Harvard, it 
will be fun to walk in front of 
him." 



FOSTER and KLEISER 

Division of Metromedia, Inc. 

1675 EDDY STREET 

San Francisco 19, California 

McCoy Church Goods Co., Inc. 

Catholic Supplies ind Religious Articles 

GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

111 Golden Gate Ave. UN 3-7080 San Francisco 



COLAN HEATING & SHEET METAL CO. 

AIR CONDITIONING 

GUTTERS - DRAIN PIPE - CHIMNEYS - SKYLIGHTS 

GARBAGE CANS 

22 PATTERSON STREET Phone ATwater 2-2616 

Consolidated Purchasing & Designing Co. 

235 Montgomery Street 
EX 2-4992 San Francisco 

BAKER BROS. AUTO BODY, INC. 

Foreiiin Cars Our Specialty 

140 Hayes St. MA 1-6252 

San Francisco, Calif. 

CALIFORNIA PACIFIC UTILITIES CO. 



YU 6-0433 



550 California St. 



San Francisco. California 



FRENCH and DANISH PASTRIES — SPECIAL OCCASION CAKES 
Phone JU 5-9213 

RED CHERRY BAKERY 

Discounts for All Churches, Clubs and Organizations 
4617 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

CHESTER'S AUTO REPAIR 

TUNE-UPS MOTOR REBUILDING 

ALTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS 

BRAKE SERVICE 

639 Gou«h St. WAlnut 1-5355 San Francisco, Calif. 

Berkeley Hills Chapel 

—ONE OF CALIFORNIA'S FINEST— 

1600 SHATTUCK AVENUE, at Cedar Street 

THornwall 1-2300 Berkeley 9. Californio 

In Walnut Creek — PLEASANT HILL AREA — See 

OAK PARK HILLS CHAPEL 

MAGLEBY, PAGE and ODER 

3111 NORTH MAIN WALNUT CREEK 

BARRY, O NEILL & DIERCKS 

Insurance Brokers 

256 MONTGOMERY STREET DO 2-2663 

San Francisco, California 

Golden Gale H<)sj3ital, Inc. 

1065 Sutter St. OR 3-2600 

San Francisco 



THE RECOR 



SOLLY SCHUMAN'S 

(:aterin(; skkvick 

CIT\- PARKS 

Main Office — Aquatic i'ark (Fdot n[ Van Nl\>; Ave.) 

GR a.g:";! san francisco 

Parisian Baking Co, 

1995 Evans Avr. VA 6-1273 

San Francisco, Calif. 

SKY- WAY BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Marshall S. Dc Vaughn. Pastor 
5.S. 9:30 — Worship 10:50 A.M. and 7 P.M. — Day Nursery— Kindergorten 

Monday - Friday. Age 3-6 years 
iOO GAVIN ST. — DE. 3-5272 Nursery — DE 3-2302 

JAMES E. STRATTEN 

Executor — Booker T. Washington Community Center 
Commissioner — Board of Education, San Francisco 

L and H Paint Products 



150 Mississippi St. 



HE 1-4766 



San Francisco, California 



STATEWIDE MOVING 

Blair Exclusive Piano Movers 

ROBT. -Bob" BEGGS 
■iom,- Phone: fU 6-6234 Bus. Phone: MA 1-5846 

BELL JEWELERS 

Longine. Hamilton and Bulora Watches 

Gifts - Diamonds Pearls - ]ade 

Watch, Clock and fewelry Repair 

'15 IRVING ST. MO 1-1080 

TOPS INTERIOR DECORATING 

Modern - Interiors 

MR. MARIO 

«00 BRY.ANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 10 

Mission 8-5777 



■INE FOOD 



COCKTAILS 



BRASS RAIL 



1065 MARKET STREET 
)RLANDO R. VELEZ Teltphom-: HE 1-497 



MEL S TRUCKING 
SERVICE 



30580 ALGUIRE ROAD 
JEfferson 8-4«44 



UNION CITY 




Claude Berhouct and Claudine Berhouet, Props. 



Hotel de France 



BAR . RESTAURANT - HOTEL 



780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

Sweetheart Hams and Bacon 
"Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 
— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



:EMBER - JANUARY. 1963 



ABBOT A. HANKS 

(Continued from Page 21 
ence. it has weathered fire and 
earthquake, two world wars, and 
many long strikes in industry. 

The firm of Abbot A. Hanks was 
incorporated in the year 1924 and 
is owned almost entirely by certain 
long-time employees. 

In the selection of a laboratory, 
the client looks for reliability and 
a background of favorable experi- 
ence. Its unbia.sed reports are of 
great value and establish assur- 
ance with the client that he is get- 
ting what has been specified. 

The problems to be handled by 
an independent laboratory are al- 
most endless. There are many new- 
elements of research to be deter- 
mined, especially in this atomic 
age. 

Complete quality control and in- 
spection as performed by an inde- 
pendent laboratory are deemed 
necessary in proving new methods 
— as, for instance, on reinforced 
concrete and masonry construc- 
tion using high lift grouting sys- 
tem, whether it be brick or con- 
crete block work. 

Commissioned by a structural en- 
gineer client, the Hanks laboratory 
has performed testing and inspect- 
ing services in connection with the 
construction of 96-foot pre-stressed 
concrete beams weighing 50 tons 
and containing 32 cubic yards of 
concrete. Such inspection was nec- 
essary to assure that all materials 
should meet the requirements of 
the engineer. 

A mere change in the type of 
solvent used in the fabrication of 
a plastic material was discovered 
to be responsible for damage to a 
stainless steel flexible chain con- 
veyor belt carrying a plastic pro- 



duct through a drying fornace. 
The conveyor belt corroded and 
lasted only six weeks instead of a 
normal life of eight to ten months. 
Analysis by Hanks metallurgists 
and chemists proved that the belt 
was identical to many other.s sup- 
plied by the manufacturer, but the 
substitution of a different solvent 
in the plastic fabrication caused the 
trouble. 

Much trouble occurs with the 
finished linoleum on concrete floors 
if any amount of moisture is pres- 
ent, because it affects the adhesi- 
tive bond. This condition under a 
newly installed linoleum tiled floor 
was evident because of insects — 
"Spring Tail"- -which were found 
by our laboratory to be living in 
this space. These are examples 
of the problems presented to any 
independent testing and inspect- 
ing laboratory. 

The firm of Abbot A. Hanks, Inc., 
the oldest laboratory of its kind in 
our country, while a member of 
long standing in many local and 
national technical societies, is a 
charter member of the American 
Council of Independent Labora- 
tories, established in 1937, an or- 
ganization which consists of sci- 
entfic and professional laboratories, 
with members in most of the im- 
portant areas in the United States. 
In order to become a member of 
this group, it is necessary to be 
thoroughly screened by a group 
who are familiar with the oper- 
ations of the independent labor- 
atory. 



Victoria Pastry Co., inc. 

Italian and French Pastries 

and Confections 

Cakes for All Occasions 

1362 Stockton Street 

SU 1-2015 



SHREVE & CO. 

Jewelers 

POST 8C GRANT AVENUE GA 1-2600 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CONTINENTAL SERVICE COMPANY 

260 Fifth Street 
San Francisco 3, California 



PRODUCTiON, ELECTRONICS & AERO-DYNAiVIIC 

L0DGE1327-I.A.ofM., AFL-CIO 

2450-17111 Slrcfl San Francisco 10. (alif 

INDUSTRIAL CARPENTERS UNION, LOCAL 2565 

Chartered by United Brotherhood of Carpenters and foinen of Amerio 

Affiliated with S.F. Building 8C Construction Trades Council - Californi; 

State Council of Carpenters • Bay Counties Dist. Council of Carpenter 

California State Labor Federation - Union Labor Party 



3608 - 19th Street San Francisco 10, Califo 



MArket 1-78I< 



CALIFORNIA MEAT COMPANY 



WHOLESALERS — JOBBERS 
SAUSAGE MANUFACTURERS 



MONTGOMERY AND MERCHANT STREETS 
Telephone GA 1-6186 San Francisco 11, Calif 



JACKSON'S HARDWARE 

BUILDERS SUPPLIES— PAINTS 

PLUMBING HARDWARE 

1315 -20th Ave. SE 1-5615 



VAN ECKHARDT 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

760 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco EX. 2-6635 



Francisco Delicatessen 

Scandinavian Foods 
Imported - Domestic 

Catering to Weddings. 

Cocktail Parties, Banquets, Etc. 

ERNEST MEYER 

2233 Market St. .. Dial UN. M694 



EASTMAN BROS. 

TEXACO SERVICE 

Complete Automotive Service 
1501 Golden Gate Avenue 

JO. 7-86'>6 

McKALE 

SERVICE STATION 

Emil Smith — Operator 

Luhe Service - - Tires 
555 Irving St. OV. 1-7710 



MISSION PRESCRIPTIOl 

PHARMACY 

Philip Hcidt, St. 
598 Guerrero St. UN. 1-15 



CLUB MARIA 

JOE y MARIA VENTURI 

Cocktails - Italian Food 8C 

Fish Grotto 

229 LEAVENWORTH 

PR. 5-9588 PR. 5-78 

Tlie PINK CLOUD 

COCKTAILS 

Your Host — FRED PAZ 
1723 Polk St. PR. 6-41 



PLAZA HOTEL 

CIGAR STAND 

Cigars - Cigarettes - Newspapcn 
Magazines 
Imported dC Domestic Liquors 
MO Post St. SV. 1-72 

17th 8C BALBOA 

GROCERY 

GROCERIES — PRODUCE 
BEER — WINE 
1601 Balboa St. SK. l-33i 



CREDIT INIOINS 

(Continued from Page 61 
lldation loans, with lesultanl 
ver payments, have frequently 
ide it possible for many mem- 
rs previously renting apartments 
now live in their own homes. 
'To quote one of our members: 
lyroll deduction is like being on 
rcotics. once you're on it, you 
i/er want to get off.' Many a 
mber has paid off a loan through 
yroll deduction and simply al- 
/ed the deduction to continue 

his savings. Many have quite 
enly stated that if it weren't for 
s type of enforced savings, they 
uldn't have any at all. 
Concurring in the advantages of 
rroll deduction is Arthur F. Mc- 
yre. treasurer-manager of the 
emen's Credit Union, who points 
; that his organization handles 
ne loans, home improvements. 
lege education, personal loans 

1 "thrifty credit accounts" in 
ich department store charge ac- 
ints are kept current every 30 

'S. 

'The rate of interest charged on 
• home loans is 7.2 per cent." 
adds, "with home loan mort- 
»e insurance included in this 
e. All other rates are Si of 1 
' cent on the unpaid balance. 
Jeorge H. Trelut, treasurer - 
nager of the Municipal Em- 
yees Credit Union, says his or- 
lization started in 1955 with 



.■58 members and assets of $3,000. 
Only 3 loans were made during the 
first month. As.sets today total 
$1,115.2911, he explains, adding: 

"Time and time again, expres- 
sions from the members have prov- 
en to us the need of Credit Unions 
and the useful purpose of them. 
Such expressions as: 'The Credit 
Union should have been started 
long ago.' 'Your best collateral for 
borrowing is your share deposits.' 
'I have never been able to save 
until I joined the Credit Union,' 
'The Credit Union insurance pro- 
gram is unbelievable' and many 
others." 

The Recreation and Parks Cred- 
it Union keeps its members posted 
on benefits available through its 
monthly publication which is 
mailed to all members, according 
to Robert A. Lamkins, secretary- 
treasurer. 

The "Par Rec-Ord" provides lat- 
est news on actions of its officers 
and board of directors, on divi- 
dend pa.vments. loan opportunities, 
etc. Also provided is a question 
and answer column on Credit Un- 
ion matters. 

Arthur Mclnt.yre supplies a per- 
tinent closing for this article with 
the following observation: 

"I sincerely believe that our 
Credit Union and all of the others 
are serving a very useful purpose 
in that one of the finest compensa- 
tions in this life is that no man 
can sincerely try to help another 
without helping himself." 



FRANKLIN MARKET 

Groceries - Produce - Wine - Beer 
ARBECUED CHICKEN TO GO 
836 Franklin St. GR. 4-8069 

THE RUTH WILKINS RAYMOND 

rivate High School, Inc. 

Co-Educational — Accredited 

Non'Sectarian 

5636 Washington Street 

San Frandsco 18, California 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Fall Term — Sept. 10 

PHONE: Fillmore 6-5906 

Ruth Wilkins Raymond 

Owner and Principal 



B 8C J 

LIQUOR STORE 

ALL BRANDS 
553 Divisadero St. JU. 7-1880 



MAURICE GONZALES 

CONSTRUCTION CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
620 La Grande Avenue 

JU. 4-9605 



SHANGHAI POOL ROOM 

931 KEARNY ST. 
San Frandsco 



PALACE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

2800 GENEVA .AVE. JU 5-1334 SAN FRANCISCO 

"Blessings to City Employees and Families^'' 

UNITY TEMPLE 

Reverend Mary Scully 
1164 Market Street San Francisco 



iKVirs(; 

JMIAK^ACY 

CARL HALLFORD 

woo IRVING ST. 

MO 4-0221 

San Francisco 



ALPHA STOKES 

Complete Line of 

Groceries, Meats 

Produce and Liquors 

Roy Mitchell, Matiager-Owiter 

3520 BALBOA ST. 

SK 2-1673 

5 398 - 22nd ST. 

VA 6-5584 



COST PLUS IMPORTS 

Exciting and Unpredictable from 
Around the World 

2552 TAYLOR ST. 

(bet. Bay and North Point) 

NORTH POINT STREET 

(bet. Taylor and Mason) 

AMPLE PARKING 



SUNSHINE REST HOME 

Twenty-four Hour Core for 
AMBULATORY GUESTS 

MEN ond WOMEN 
Elevator Service 

ANNE MURRAY 

719- 36th Ave.. San Fronclsco 
SKyllne 1-7705 



Mutal Fund Associates 

incorporated 

700 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Exbrook 7-6400 

SAN FRANCISCO II, CALIF. 



Van Wormer and 
Rodrigues, Inc. 

Manufacturing lewelers 

126 POST ST. 

EX 2-5886 
San Francisco 



COLONIAL FLOWER SHOP 

Flowers for All Occasions 
FLORAL DESIGNS - CUT FLOWERS 

Conages. Weddingt a Specialty 

GRACE ond PETE BRIA, Owners 

1150 MILLSIDE BLVD., COLMA 

Telephone PL 5-2556 



RENAISSANCE 
Restaurant 

5241 GEARY BLVD. 
SK 2-8558 



Silver Crest Do-Nut Shop 

340 BAYSHORE BLVD. 

SAN FRANOSCO 

CALIFORNIA 



ERNIE'S 
Neptune Fish Grotto 

Speciulizing in Freih Sea Foodf 

LiiiK-h unj Dirin.r Servtd 

1816 IRVING STREET 

N«ar I9th Avenue 

LOmbard 6-JJ44 



REITER'S FURNITURE 

WIOE StLtc.TlciNS 
Nationallv Advertised Appliance, of 

All Types — Easy Terms 

Come in and look around— No high 

pressure— Free Parkins m rear 

4760 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco DEIaware 4-4800 



THE B AND E CLUB 

Gcort;e and J.ni— Your Hu,.t.s 

2950 - 16th STREET 

MArket 1-4495 San Francisco 



AMON RECREATION CENTER 
and RESTAURANT 

832 KEARNY STREET 



. SIGBRITT'S RESTAURANT . 

245 CHURCH STREET 
SanFr; 



MABEL I^INTON GUEST HOUSE 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9253 



NERO'S BEAUTY SHOP 

1718 DIVISADERO ST. 
WA 1-1829 



IVY'S BEAUTY SALON 

181 2 »2 EDDY STREET 
JO 7-3684 



CEMBER - JANUARY. 1963 



BAY WINDOW 

iConliniied rmin PiiRo Si 
JlO.OOn.nnn airport KaraKo boiKi 
issue, and a whopping $790,000,000 
rapid transit bond issue. Pundit 
Caylor has called him Promotion 
Man of the Year, a title he's cer- 
tainly earned through his consist- 
ent scoring of voter - influencing 
bull's-eyes. Make that a double 
Gibson and end this item with a 
deserved exclamation mark! . . . 

Or a Scotch-over-ice to Lawyer 
Ben Lerer. new president of the 
S. F. Bar Assn.. also new presi- 
dent of the Jim Adam Bridge Dis- 
trict, in the hope he'll have enough 
spare time left over for Law . . . 
Speaking of Scotch-over-ice, it was 
Chinatown publicist Charlie Leong 
who used to badger friends who 
had ordered that drink by produc- 
ing Scotch-over-RICE . . . 

Or a vodka gimlet to a lad who 
started "hacking" behind a Yellow 
Cab wheel 40 years ago and who 
has now retired as a Yellow Cab 
veep at the still-energetic age of 
71: John W. Pettit . . . And share 
that same toast with another veep 
who'll retire next year from his 
familiar post of executive vice 
president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce- Louie Fox, whose contribu- 
tions to the city he adopted 20 
years ago when he came to the 
Chamber from Stockton have been 
considerable indeed . . . 

Or something real fancy like, 
say. a Rainbow Flip to ABC Vice 
President Dave Sacks whose KGO- 
T'V is putting up a 40-foot tower 
resembling last years' Space Needle 
of Seattle at the corner of 4th and 




the five percentages they've dc- 
vi.sed to gladden the hearts and tn 
weight the pockethooUs nf the civil 
.servfint.s during 19fi3? . . . You're 
not drinking? Because .vou re- 
ceived only a goose-egg? Now you 
can't just sit there sullenly and let 
the Distilled Spirits Institute down 
like that! Here, friend, have one 
on the House! . . . 



JOHN W. PETTIT 
Vice President, Yellow Cab 

Market; revolving on the tower 
top will be a constant stream of 
News, a word composed of the 
first letter of each of the four di- 
rections — this being the extra 
bonus you perennial readers of 
Bay Window have come to expect? 
. . . The tower site is the paved 
parking lot graveyard of the State 
Theater; remember when, during 
the days of Yore. Coffee Dan's and 
Pop Ernst's States, it was the Cali- 
fornia Theater? Let's throw a 
short, sad one down the hatch in 
memory of all the lavished the- 
aters, victims of hotels and park- 
ing lots . . . and fill it up again. 
Joe, for one more for the fading 
Fox . . . 

Or, finally, friends, how about a 
foaming stein-full to genial George 
Grubb and his merry men of Civil 
Service for the two-and-a-half and 




Enroll Now 

HILLTOP BEAUTY SCHOOL 



Hollywood Trained Instructors 



6517 Mission Street — Daly City 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



PL 6-9877 



III! 

W. HARRY JOHNS 
Realtor 

322 Hayes Street 



SCHOOL OF REAL ESTATE 

Vital Legal Procedures 

Classes Monday and Tuesday 
Evenings 
REAL ESTATE 
SALES 

EXCHANGES 
RENTALS 
PROBATE 

UNderliill 3-6692 



San Francisco, California 



THE HONGKONG 

BANKING 
CORPORATION 
OF CALIFORNIA 
AND SHANGHAI 

A Subsldlory of The Honqltong Bon 
Group which has more than MO 
offices fhroughoul the world . . . 




I SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



■ Federal Depo 
Corporatio 



G. I-. ItVX 

Exec. Vice President 

S. F. Chamber of Commeri 



BLUE STAR CAFE 

Home au.k.ns 
482-A HAYES STREET 



Thomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
Lombard 4-0180 



Baskclb.ill, Baseball, Foolball, Softball, Golf, Track, Tennis, Bowling 
Uniforms, Trophies &. Medals, Ski Rentals, Hunting, Fishing 

FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 



1404 TARAVAL STREET 



San Francisco 16, Cilif. 



North Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Nenesl Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational View 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-292« 

Reasonable Rates — Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 



GLEN PARK SELF-SERFICE LAUNORY 

CLARA POLTMAN 
2842 Dl.nmond St. Telephone JU 7-569J San FrancLsco, Calif 



WHIT HENRY 

KNmtiniKMi from PaRi' Til 

; Cell 11 rono. iin<l it lalor rairiril 
column. "Baibeishop Ballads," 
ing Mickey's hut for locale, and 
jrvbody contributed to it, as I 
ind that news is where you can 
d it. 

"Did they sing in there?" de- 
inds Whit. 

Heck, chum, do they sing in 
a n y barbershops even today. 
Tie the Society for the Preserva- 
n of Barbershop Singing (is that 
pvhere near the title ? ) or go the 
jtomer ? 

If ears ago when days were meas- 
>d in creative work and sociable 
therings instead of how much 
;h square foot on the street 
uld return in cash from the tour- 
, beach picnics were a town fes- 
ity. A penciled note on the fence 
«t to the Schweninger Baker.v 
uld suggest that villagers gather 
the sands at sundown, say at 
ok's Cove well toward the south- 
l end. Guests brought their own 
>d, with a custodian of the huge 
fee pot lugging it along to heat 
;r driftwood flames. 
Dutstanding were the abalone 
mers where the shellfood were 
ed oft the rocks at low tide, the 
lat cut out and tenderized by 
iinding on the rocks. Yes, the 
lalone Song was sung as the 
iting went on. A typical verse: 



"Oh, some folks boast of quail on 
toast, and they may think it tony. 
But I'm content tn owe my rout, 
.ind live nil Hbiiliinc." The rhyme 
and niftcr limited the total number 
of authentic verses which had, as 
legend says, been composed by 
poets Herbert Heron and George 
Sterling, writers Jimmy Hopper. 
Fred Bechdolt, Mary Austen and 
.Jack London, to mention names. 

"Were there any serpents in this 
Eden, " queries Whit? 

Of course. The Southern Pacifit- 
planned to run a track from Pacific 
Grove through Pebble Beach and 
down to Carmel Mission, then back 
uptown to Junipero and Ocean av- 
enues, now a prime business area. 
And, too, a glass factory leased 
part of the beach sand dunes be- 
cause the sacred white sand was 
found to have excellent glass-mak- 
ing qualities. Train and factory 
would have been serpents indeed. 
Whit, but neither materialized. 

Progress can't be prevented, and 
is probably a good thing for the 
one-time secluded village. Tangible 
values of real estate are toted up 
at the bank, not in friendly gather- 
ings, unlocked front doors and leis- 
urel.v life in a forested playground 
with a scattering of dwellers be- 
side the sea. 



PICKWICK 
MOTOR HOTEL 

O. C. Campbell, Mgr. 

5th 8C Mission Sts. 

San Francisco 

GA 1-7500 

Free Overnight Parking 
us to Ball Park at Front Door 
Visit our Byline Coctail Lounge 

ROBERT ALCHIAN 

JEWELER - WATCHMAKER 

Diamonds— Antiques—gifts 
123 Taraval Street OV 1-6389 

RAYMOND 0. WONG 

[NSURANCE BROKER 

Fire — Liability — Life — Auto 

WESTERN LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

818 CLAY STREET 
Bus: GA 13975 



BALYACQ 

FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Reliable Laundry Service 
U6 Clement St. SK. 1-0971 



lELAND FLORISTS 

FLOWERS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

Free Delivery 

5 Leiaiid Ave. DE 3-8493 

SAN FRANCISCO 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 1963 Fords 



Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2500 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 
Instruments for Hnnd Surgery 
Active Hand QC Finger Splints 

70 nth STREET 
MA 1-6876 



SCAVENGERS" 

PROTECTIVE 

ASSOCIATION, INC. 

2550 MASON STREET 
EX 2-3859 



MIKE INOUYE'S 

RICHFIELD SERVICE 

Tune Up Si Repairs — Tires 

Batteries — Accessories 

PICKUP a: DEUVERV 

1999 Pine St. San Francisco, Cal. 

WAInut 1-2825 



OTAGIRI 

MERCANTILE CO., INC. 

OUR NEW ADDRESS 

1400 FOLSOM STREET 

Corner of 10th HE. 1-9555 



EXbrok 2.1313 - Telephones - EXbrook 2-1829 

GEORGE L. BURGER 

Wholesale Dealer Potatoes and Onions 

52 VALLEJO STREET 
San Francisco 11, California 



CONSTRUCTION 
AGGREGATES 
CORPORATION 

Telephone DOuglas 3-1718 
505 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 5, Calif. 



KLEINS 
LEGAL SERVICE 

LEGAL DIAGRAMS 
448 Larkin St. PR 5-1045 

BILL LUECK 



Mission 8-9998 

THE 
CHEROKEE 

Sam ■ Tony • Terry 

455 CORTLAND AVE. 
San Francisco 

J. BIZON 

Used Furnuurcand all kinds of 
Merchandise - We buy and sell 

856 McAllister street 

Phone Day or Night 
Bus. Fl. 6-6605 Res. MO. 4-1809 



BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

Specialists on Wheel Alignment 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitation Ave. JU. 7-7020 

Bill Barca San Francisco 



Custom-Aire 
Products 

Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Eorced Air - Gas Fired Heaters 

& Wall Furnaces 

Air Conditioning 

• 

6(>o Indiana Street 

VA 6-7171 



CEMBER- JANUARY. 1Q63 



REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 

1600 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 9, California 

PRospect 6-0880 



VOLKSWAGEN 

— Distributors — 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - NORTRERN NEVAOA • UTAH 




i;^ AJREXCE N. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



FruitvaU Chopel 
1580 FRUITVALE AVENU" 

KEIlog 3-4114 



Elmhuril Chapel 

8901 E. Ulh STREET 

NEptune 2-4343 



Public Library, 
Periodicals Room, 
Civic Center. City 2. 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Pennit No. 4507 



^on, a ttecu eU«U*t^ cxfienceMCC . . . 




Located at 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



William O. (Bill) 

DUFFY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
TAX CONSULTANT 



2888 MISSION ST. 



AT. 2-4151 



1 



APR 5 ISoJ 



SAN FRANCISCO 


AND 


THE 


BAY 


AREA 


EDWARD T. MANCUSO 




1 








SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC DEFENDER 




^^^^^^1 


r^^^^^i 


I V^ 


SS^^Hi 


By DEAN ST. DENNIS 




^^^^B 




f V 


V « 


AROUND & ABOUT 




^^^1 


^Bfi? ^^^^1 




y ^m 


6, WHIT HENRY 




^^^H 




I- 


^^^B 


BAY WINDOW 




P^U 


n '^ 




^^^B . 


KENDRICK HALL 


^^^^Hrr^ 


^j^^H 






.^^^^K 


JAMES W. KELLY, JR. 




1 


l\ 


a 





EDWARD T. MANCUSO, PUBLIC DEFENDER 




FEBRUARY -MARCH. 1963 



KENDRICK HALL'S MOOT COURT ROOM 



By Jnnu-H \V. Kelly, Jr. 

One of the singular features of 
Kcndiick Hall, the new University 
of San Francisco School of Law. 
is the moot court room. Here, stu- 
dents learn the rules of courtroom 
procedure under conditions and in 
surroimdings much like those they 
will meet as future attorneys. 

While it gives the appearance of 
a court, it also has an amphi- 
theater atmosphere which allows 
it to be used for movies, lectures 
and debates. The political science 
department is currently conduct- 
ing an Institute on Communism for 
junior and senior high school teach- 
ers who meet in the 122-seat cham- 
ber. 



The room is situated in the 
ground level of the "drum." the 
distinctively curved portion of the 
five-story building. Paneled in dark 
walnut, it is wedge-shaped, with 
students' desks on stepped level.^ 
facing a judges' bench and jury 
box at the narrow end. 

The moot court serves the same 
function in a law school as war 
games and fleet maneuvers do for 
the arined forces. The idea is to 
stimulate an actual courtroom sit- 
uation in its way. not unlike a 
battleground. 

At Kendrick Hall, the intraschool 

moot court program is the final 

examination for the course in legal 

(Continued on Page 121 




Moot court room in University of 
San Francisco's Kendrick Hall is used 
for collegiate debates as well as legal 
training. Above. USF hosts team fiom 



Yeshiva University in New York City. 
Note rooiti'r dignified wood paneling, 
jury box at Icfa, judges* bench behind 
speaker. 



PITTSBURGH 

TESTING 
LABORATORY 

Established 1881 

INSPECTING ENGINEERS 
and CHEMISTS 



651 HOWARD STREET 

San Francisco 5, California 




Don't be a dishwasher, buy one! 

Don't just stand there — whisk those dirty dishes into an 
automatic dishwasher. They'll come out sparkhng clean — 
washed by water hotter than hands can stand. And you'll 
save more than four hours of dish drudgery a week. Why 
not look at dishwashers today? See them at your Reddy 
Recommended Appliance Dealer. 

/'act/ic Gas and Electric djiupany 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

174S FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 3t California 

UNderhill 1-1455 

St. HI Sciuii.m 

California Trophy and Engraving Co. 

PRospect 6-6932 

Jewt'lry — Diamonds — Watches 

299 Ellis Street San Franci-ico 2, California 



THE RECOR 



PLftiCiiiCAL DiEPT. 

APR 5 '£6J 

•AN FRANCISCO' 
PUBLIC LInBA?r 



bay 





Ah. the winds of change are blowing! One has but to look at the of pol 
iding list of identifiable political figures to realize that The Very politic: 
/orst is happening to Our Fair City. Ah. 

Like, man, James Leo Halley. There was an astute member of highly 
an Francisco's revei'ed Board of Supervisors, if there ever was one. down 
We are saying was? No,, perish the thought: Supervisor James our 
■eo will endure through the rest 
f this fine fiscal year that we 
tirough the dint of united and ob- 
iouslv productive effort — have 
pawned. 

Then he will be replaced by — 
'hom ? 

As of this writing there appears 
J be two openings looming on the 
lovember ballot: James Leo who 
'in retire to the lushly rela.xed 
fe of manager of Colma's Wood- 
iwn Memorial Park — and Harold 
>obbs who is foresaking the im- 
robable joys of the supervisorial 
oard for the rigors of seeking ye 
layorality. 

But before Harold becomes May- 
r of San Francisco Town he will. 
jresooth, have to tilt lances with 
16 likes of not only Jack Shelley 
-who has been our peerless rep- 
jsentative in the hallowed halls 
f Congress for 'lo these many 
ears -but with any number of 
lesently nameless individuals who 
'ould be Mayor also. 

Like the Perennial Haberdash- r 
-name of Irvington Wales Trus- 
ale- who is to be heavily find need 
Jr his utterly fascinating fling in- 
) the frightfully wonderful arena 



itics. Imagine Irvington in 
s and a Mayor, yet! 
hah, he'll have to work his 
polished fingertips right 
to the very bone . . . for 
highly secret underground 




sources supply the intriguing and, 
of course, very restrictive informa- 
tion that Another Party is about 
to throw his hat into the ring! 

None other than the Prince of 
Pepperstick Palaces — yes! — none 
other than that weilder of the scis- 
sors supreme, that Master of the 
unManageable Mane, none other 
than Mr. Henri . . . 

(Continued on Page 14) 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

The Magazine of Good Goyernmenl 
San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 



Edii 



and Puhhvhc 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14. California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

FEBRUARY - MARCH, 1963 
VOLUME 30 NUMBER 2 



JAMES LEO HALLEY 
Supervisor 




HAROLD DOBBS 
Supervisor 


McGUIRE 


and 

• 


HESTER 


General Contractors 


796 -66th AVENUE 




• 




Telephone 


NEptiinf 


2-7676 


Oakland 


21, California 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




"vcn most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do— every year and say, "There's 
nothinc like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 
low. 

V'Drives, 

Limousines, 

Charter Buses 

available 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



EBRLARY- MARCH. I96J 



EDWARD T. MANCUSO 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

City and County of San Francisco 



By DEAN ST. DENNIS 

Edward T. Mancuso says he will decide by April If) whether ho "Your records prove that the 

will enter the race for mayor of San Francisco. young fellow who goes to jail on 

"We're weighing the question seriously now." said Mancuso. San a misdemeanor goes to Jail on a 

Francisco's Public Defender. "I'm moving with caution, inquiring felony in later years. By repre- 



into the feelings of the public. 

"I don't want to be a candidate and I 
I can win. You just don't jump in- 
to a race like this because people 
ask you to." 

But he made it clear that a lot 
of people have urged him to seek 
the city's top elective position. 
"They've been pressing me to run." 

One reason, he said, is that "We 
have gained national recognition as 
one of the finest Public Defender's 
offices in the country. They feel 
I would make a good mayor." 

For another thing, Mancuso 
ser\'ed on the city's Board of Sup- 
ervisors 10 V2 years before being 
appointed Public Defender in 19.54. 
He has been elected three times 
since. 

"I served on all of the important 
committees on the board, including 
the Finance and Judiciary commit- 

tees._ I'm familiar with budgeting j^^. permission "to handle m'isde 
meanors as well, for I saw young 



and I have an excellent knowledge 
of county government. 

"I know being mayor is a tre- 
mendous responsibility and it 
would take a lot of time. It's al- 
ways a question of whether you 
want to give that much time." 

But. Mancuso added, San Fran- 
cisco is facing a multitude of prob- 
lems "problems that have to be 
solved in the immediate future." 

The city has growing numbers 
of senior citizens, and their needs 
must be met, he said. "I'm also 
concerned about jobs for young- 
sters. This should be given top 
priority. 

"If you have jobs and some- 
thing for the kids to do, there is 
less chance of them getting into 
trouble with the police," Mancuso 
said. 

This concern with youth stems 
partly from Mancuso's present po- 
sition, for as Public Defender "we 
handle the cases of a lot of young- 
sters. We get them continuously.' 
' When Mancuso was appointed 
Public Defender by then Mayor El- 
mer Robin-son in 1954, the Defend- 
er's office handled only felony 
^ases. 



senting them, you're not only help- 
nl want to run imle.ss ing them but you're helping soci- 
ety." 

When Mancuso became public de- 
fender, the office was run on a 
part-time basis. He changed all 
that. 

"I gave up my own law practice. 
I was making $22,500 a year from 
my practice — and spending only 
part of my time at it. I'm still not 
making that much in this job." 

He initially had four deputy 
Public Defenders — but they were 
only part-time employees and had 
their outside law practices. 

"I put the job on a full-time 
basis," Mancuso said. "Now we 
have eight attorneys as deputy 
Public Defenders — and they are 
full-time employees." 

However, in view of the increased 
I immediately made a request work load, "we're still very defin- 
itely understaffed." Mancuso said. 

"Our case load has increased 

more than that of any other Pub- 

Man- 



"Because of a lack of proper p< 
sonnel, I feel we're not doing t 
job we should, and I'm not hap; 
(Continued on Page 10) 




EDWARD T. MANCUSO 
Public Defender 



.sters pleading guilty to misde 

meanors on the uncorroborated He Defender in the nation 

testimony of police officers. cuso said. 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

13URLINGAME, California 



IT PAYS TO BE 
"CIVIC" MINDED 



4!% 



Save by lOth - earn from 1st 
Current annual rate 

CIVIC 
FEDERAL 
SAVINGS 

and Loan Association 

515 POLK STREET 

I block north of City Hall 

ORdway 3-2065 

INSURED SAFETY 



ClISTOM-AIRE 
PRODUCTS 

Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Forced Air - Gas Fired Heaters 

and Wall Furnaces 

— Air Conditioning — 

600 Indiana Street 
VA. 6-7171 



THE RECOR 



ArouDd and About 



t liv WHIT HKNIJY 

I 

(Whil Henry, who for many years has brighlencd the pages of the 
y-County Record with his fine writing, has suffered a heart attack, 
hough Whit is well on the road to recovery, it will be some time 
jre he will be able to resume his column. Until Whil returns, his 
imn will be written by some of his many friends, l 

By Winxir .Josselyn. (iuest CiihimniNt f<ir "Whit" Henry 



Win, you mean to say they 
I an International Aviation 
(t at Tanforan Race Track ? 
y not at the International Air- 
t?" asked Whit Henry after I 
gested early aviation in San 
ncisco as a column topic, 
ecause. Whit, in January 1911 
■e wasn't any International Air- 
;, nor even its predecessor, 
s Field. Tanforan was tempo- 
ly called Tanforan Aviation 
k for the event, and offered 
ity of housing for aeroplane.s 

room for takeoffs and landings 
; could be done in as little as 
feet. There was plenty of 
Cher and standing room for 
ing visitors and the railroad 

alongside at 50 cents apiece 
1 3rd and Townsend Streets, 
lourse arriving customers had 
hree-foot jump down to the 
k-side path that soon swarmed 
1 wide-eyed .spectators going 
■mell to see the manbirds. 
3tal prize money was $15,47.5. 
I $5,000 of it earmarked for the 

who topped the then world's 
rd of 11,474 feet altitude. The 
er in duration flying would get 
DO, and to qualify "an aviator 
t be in the air at least 30 min- 

during the period set aside for 
irly Contests' each day of th > 
t."" 

Bcording to the Aeronautical 
ionary and Reference Library, 
ished in 1939, no world's rec- 

were set at the meet although 
crowds saw lots of flying by 
1 famous airmen as Eugene B. 

who. shortly before the meet 

flown to and from the USS 
isylvania in San Francisco har- 
to pioneer naval "aircraft car- 
' history: Walter Brookins, in 
right biplane, destined to be the 

survivor of the Wright flying 
that included Ralph Johnston 

Arch Ho.xey; James Radley, 
lishman who had flown his 
lot to the record speed of 77.6 
s an hour; Phil Parmelee, an- 
r Wright pilot; Charlie Will- 

Curtiss flier; and Hubert La- 
1, Frenchman with his graceful 
)inette monoplane with which 
ad twice ditched in the English 



Channel trying to beat Louis Ble- 
riot across from Europe to Eng- 
land. 

Brookins told an interesting bit 
of flying at that 1911 meet when I 
knew him in North Hollywood in 
1951. "Jim Radley and I were in- 
vited to fly to the Burlingame 
Country Club, land on the lawn 
and come in for lunch," he said. 
"We got there without any trouble, 
but Radley got lost on the way 
back later and found himself flying 
out toward the Farallone Islands. 
Turning back from what must have 
been the first aviator to head for 
Hawaii, he came through the Gold- 
en Gate and back to Tanforan to 
be cheered by the crowd. It's not 
in the record books but it must 
have set some kind of a mark to 
shoot at." (Note: I find on the 
back of my program of that 1911 
meet a picture of Walter Brook- 
ins. and his autograph alongside 
it. I recall getting his signature 
during the 1951 interview, and he 
reminisced about the San Fran- 
cisco meet and others on the show 
circuit.) 

The "Official Souvenir Program 
( Continued on Page 15 ) 



PICKWICK 
Motor Hotel 

0. C. CAMPBELL, Mgr. 
Sth & Mission Sts. 

San Francisco 

GA 1-7500 

Free Overnight Parking 

Bus to Ball Park at Front Door 
Visit our BYLINE Cocktail Lounge 

Good Luck to 
"THE GIANTS" 



E. MARTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Est.ihlishcd 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 
EXbrook 7-2760 

San Francisco Auction Gallery, Inc. 



Member, Appraisers' Association of Art 

2001 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, California 

Telephone: PRospect 6-5566 

ANTIQUES FURNITURE - PAINTINGS 

ART OBJECTS - JEWELRY 



lamuUK tor 



SEAFOOD 



Lae'i 

and STEAKS xr 




Ted Ince, JACK LONDON SQUARE 

Mgr. Oohlond • HI. 4-345« 



When you're cruising the Buy 
you can Tie-up at the 

SEA WOLF DOCK 

and enjoy a Fine Dinner 

or some of our 

Famous Cocktails 



lUARY- MARCH, 1963 



HOW TO POISON-PROOF 
YOUR HOME 

Accidental poisoning amonR chil- 
dren is one of the most common 
medical conditions treated in the 
Health Department's Emergency 
Hospitals. This is not surprising 
when we remember that today's 
youngsters are surrounded by a 
multitude of dangerous products in 
the home which arc used every day. 
Each year about .iOO.OOO of these 
youngsters under the age of five in 
the U.S. accidentally swallow one 
of these substances and about 500 
die as a result. Carelessness and 
ignorance on the part of parents 
contribute a great deal to these 
statistics. This is indicated when 
parents (1) store to.xic products 
where they are within the S'giit and 
reach of children; (2l leave por- 
tions of liquids as bleach, turpen- 
tine or kerosene in paper cups, 
glasses and soft-drink bottles; and 
(31 discard poisonous substances 
in waste containers where they are 
accessible to children. The four 
classes of products most often in- 
volved in accidental poisoning cases 
are (li internal medicines, particu- 
larly aspirin. (2) cleaning and pol- 
ishing agents, (3) pesticides, and 
1 4 1 petroleum substances such as 
kerosene, lighter fluid, some furni- 
ture polishes and waxes. Paints 
and thinners are also involved. 

While parents cannot be expect- 
ed to entirely eliminate these nec- 
essary products from the home, the 
following precautions, it conscien- 
tiously observed, would drastically 
reduce the number of accidental 
poisonings in children of all ages. 
1. Keep household products and 
medicines out of sight and reach 
of children. If you are using 
either of these items and must 
leave the room for only an in- 
stant, remove the container 
from the room. 




DR. ELLIS D. SOX 
Director Public Health 

Store medicines separately from 
other household products, and 
keep them in their original con- 
tainers — never in cups or soft- 
drink bottles. 

Be sure that all toxic substances 
are properly labelled, and read 
the label before using. 
Always turn the light on when 
giving or taking medicine and 
look at the label and directions. 

Since children tend to imitate 
adults — avoid taking medica- 
tions in their presence. 

Refer to medicines by their 
proper names. They are not 
candies. 

Clean out your medicine cabi- 
net periodically. Get rid of old 
medicines by flushing them 
down the toilet, rinse the con- 
tainer with water and then dis- 
card it. 

If an ingestion of a possibly 
harmful substance occurs in 
your home, call a physician im- 
mediately. Don't wait for symp- 
tons to appear. 



Mail • A - Way Service 

PROCESSORS OF 
KODAK SERVICE 

P.O. Box 3565 Rincon Annex 

SAN FRANCISCO 19 


BENZINGER 
BROS., INC. 

CHURCH GOODS 
RELIGIOUS GIFTS 
RELIGIOUS BOOKS 

758 MISSION STREET 

IcUphonc SU I -5159 


FRED G. AINSLIE 

Real Estate & Insurance 

Notary Public 

1346 Polk St. OR 3-7400 


BUSH'S SANDWICH SHOP 

Breakfast - Lunch - Short Order. 

240 KEARNY ST. 

GA 1-6948 


Victoria Pastry Co., Inc. 

It.ili.in .nnd French Pastries 

-ind Confections 

Cakes for All Occasions 

1362 Stockton Street 

SU 1-2015 



EAGLESON 
ENGINEERS 



615 Sansome Street 
San Francisco 11, Californij 



University of San Francisco 

Undergraduate and Graduate Programs . . . 

Liberal Arts, Business Administration, Law, Science, Education. Nursii 

evening division summer session 

San Francisco 17, California 




JOE'S TEXACO SERVICE 

- Motor Service 
Free Pick-Up & Delivery - Brake Specialists 

- Wheel Balancing 

JOE ARCHAMBAULT - JU. 5-3495 

OCEAN and ALEMANY 

San Francisco 12, California 



SAN FRANCISCO 





Giant Outlets for 1963 Season 

Roos/ Atkins Stores: 

San Francisco — Market at Stockton Street 

San Jose — Santa Qara &L First Streets 

Hillsdale — Hillsdale Shopping Center 

Sacramento — 1001 "K" Street 

San Leandro — Bay Fair Shopping Center 

Abe Rose Sports Store — 2118 Broadway, Oakland 
Craigie SC Jenson Motors — 1 1 South Soscol Ave., Napa 
Burlingame Motors — 200 California Drive, Burlingame 
Forster Travel Service — McHenry Village, Modesto 
Forster Travel Service — 224 N. Center St., Turlock 
Greyhound Bus Lines — Any Ticket Depot in N. Calif. 



1963 HOME SCHEDULE 



16 (Tues.) 


— Houston 




17 iWed.) 


—Houston 


(N) 


18 (Thurs 


) — Houston 




19 iFri.l— 


-Chicago 


(N) 


20 (Sat.) — Chicago 




21 (Sun.)- 


-Chicago 


(Double) 


22 (Mon.l 


—Cincinnati 


(N) 


23 iTues.i 


—Cincinnati 




24 (Wed.i 


—St. Louis 




25 (Thurs 


) — St. Louis 




26 iFii.)- 


-Milwaukee 


(N) 


27 (Sat.l- 


-Milwaukee 




28 (Sun.)- 


-Milwaukee 




MAY 






14 (Tues.) 


— Pittsburgh 


(N) 


15 (Wed.) 


—Pittsburgh 




16 (Thurs.) — New York 




17 (Fri.)- 


-New York 


(N) 


18 (Sat.)- 


-New York 




19 (Sun.)- 


-Philadelphia 


(Double) 


21 (Tues.) 


—Philadelphia 


(N) 


22 (Wed.) 


—Philadelphia 




24 (Fri.)- 


-Los Angeles 


(N) 


25 (Sat.)- 


-Los Angeles 




26 (Sun.)- 


-Los Angeles 





JUNE 

12 (Wed.) — Chicago 

13 (Thurs.) — Chicago 

14 (Fri.) — Houston 

15 (Sat. )— Houston 

16 (Sun.) — Houston 

17 (Mon.) — Los Angeles 

18 (Tues.) — Los Angeles 

19 (Wed.)— Los Angele.s 

28 (Fri.) — Cincinnati 

29 (Sat. )— Cincinnati 

30 (Sun.) — Cincinnati 



JULY 

1 (Mon.) 

2 (Tues.) 

3 (Wed.) 

4 (Thurs 

5 (Fri.)- 

6 (Sat.)- 

7 (Sun.)- 

23 (Tues.) 

24 (Wed.) 

25 (Thurs 

26 (Fri.)- 

27 (Sat. )- 

28 (Sun.)- 

29 (Mon.) 

30 (Tues.) 

31 (Wed.) 



(Double) 
(N) 
(N) 



—Cincinnati 
—Milwaukee 
—Milwaukee 
) — Milwaukee 
-St. Louis 
-St. Louis 
-St. Louis 
—New York 
—New York 
) — New York 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
— Pittsburgh 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 



(Double) 

(N) 



AUGUST 

20 (Tues.) — Milwaukee 

21 (Wed.) — Milwaukee 

22 (Thurs.)— Milwaukee 

23 (Fri.) — Cincinnati 

24 (Sat.) — Cincinnati 

25 (Sun.) — Cincinnati 

26 (Mon.)— St. Louis 

27 (Tues.) — St. Louis 

28 (Wed.)— St. Louis 

SEPTEMBER 



2 (Mon.)- 

3 (Tues.) 

4 (Wed.) 

5 (Thurs. 

6 (Fri.)- 

7 (Sat.)- 

8 (Sun.)- 

20 (Fri.)- 

21 (Sat.)- 

22 (Sun.)- 

24 (Tues.) 

25 (Wed.) 

26 (Thurs 

27 (Fri.)- 

28 (Sat.)- 

29 (Sun.)- 



(N) 



-Chicago ( 

—Chicago 
—Houston 
) — Houston 
Los Angeles 
Los Angeles 
-Los Angeles 
New York 
New York 
-New York 
—Philadelphia 
— Philadelphia 
) -Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
-Pittsburgh 



tUARY- MARCH, 1965 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

2(11) Cilv Hall MA 1-lilCa 

(lioirKi- Chrlsloiilicr. Ma\.ir 

John D. Sulllvnn, i:\. r„i,x. >. i. raiy 
Robert M. SinnlK>. • i i l i i' l s.,i-,.lury 
Margaret SniUh, T' 1 1 1 ~^' Mt,ii-\' 
John U Moolz. Adninu-iiMn. Assialant 
Hubert Rockwell. Pnl.hi s<i w. i director 
Irwin J. Mussen. Irl.an lUncwiil Coordlnnlor 
I'yrll J. Roche. I'rinclpal Administrative Analyst 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

23B City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 

Peter Tamaras. Pre.sident. 1020 Harrison 

William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 

Roger Boas. 2.123 Oeary St. 

Joseph M. Casey. 2528 Ocean Ave. 

Harold S. Dobbs. 351 California St. 

Pr. Charles A. Rrtda. 2ri3 Cohimliiis Ave. 

John J. Ferdon. 15S MontKOmery St. 

James U Hallev. 870 Market St. 

Clarls.sa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 

Jack Morrison. 2.W0 C.reenwlch St. 

Joseph E. TInney. 2517 Mission St. 

Robert J. Dolan. Clerk 

Lillian M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — Boas. Blake. 

County. State and National Affairs — Ferdon. Dobbs, 
McMahon 

Education, Parks and Recreation' — Ertola, Blake. 
Casey 

Finance. Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs, Ferdon. 
Halley 

Judiciary, I^egislative and Civil Service — -Tinney, 
McMahon, Morrison 

Police — Casey, Ertola, Tinney 

Public Buildings. Ijands and City Planning — Mor- 
rison. Boas, Tinnev 

Public Health and Welfare— McMahon. Halley. Mor- 
rison 

Public Utilities— Halley, Dobbs, Ferdon 

Streets and Highways — Blake, Boas, Ertola 

Rul.K— Tamaras, Dobbs, Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall KL 2-1910 

Russell U Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

20B City Hall HE 1-1322 

Thomas M. O'Connor 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

.SSO Bryant St. KI^ 3-9111 

Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDIER 

KM Bryant St. KL 3-1671 

Edward T. Mancuso 

SHERIFF 

331 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Matthew C. Carberry 

TREASURER 

110 City Hall HE 1-2121 

John J. Goodwin 



COURTS 



C. Harold Caullield, Pre 
Raymond J. Arata 
Carl H. Allen 
Uyron Arnold 
John W. Bussey 
Walter Carpenetl 
Meivyn I. Cronln 
Norman Elkington 
Timothy I. Fitzpatrick 
Joseph Karesh 
Herald S. Levin 
Francis McCartv 

Joseph M. Cummins 

480 City Hall 



John B. Molinari 
Edward Molkenbuhr 
Clarence \V. Morris 
Harry J. Neubarth 
Raymond J. O'Connor 
I'Mward P. O'Day 
(.'harles S. Peery 
George W. Schonfeid 
William F. Traverse 
Alvln E. Weinberger 
H. A. van der Zee 
Secretary 

UN 1-8502 



KL 2-3008 

Andrew J. Eynian, Presiding 
FH7.-Gerald Ames. Sr. Ix;l.and J. Ijizarus 

Albert A. Axclrod Clarence A. Linn 

i;mmet Daly George K. Maloney 

Robert J. Drewes Lawrence S. Mana 

Hernard B. Gllckfeld William A. o'lirlen 

I'layton W. Horn Lenore I>. Underwood 

ICIton C. I.flWle8» Jam.s J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon, Secretary 

301 City Hall KT., 2-3008 

A. C. MeChesney. Jury Commissioner 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

MARCH 1, 1963 

I TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

sr.o Hryant St. KL 2-;!iios 

James Leddy, Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

LIT City Hall UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at S P.M. 
James J. Donohue. Foreman 
Hieliard L. Swig. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

880 Bryant St. KL 3-9111 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrlck "Vaughan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. M.atthew F. Connolly. 399 Fremont St. 
Adolph L. Plerottl. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 

JUVENILE COURT 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Wood.side Ave. SE 1-6740 



JUVENILE JUSTICE COMMISSION 

Meets 2nd Thursday of month; 1:00 P.M. 

375 Woodside Avenue 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 7U New Montgomery St. 
Reverend Hamilton T. Boswell, 1975 Post St. 
Reverend John A. Collins. 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Reverend James B. Fiynn. 1825 Mission St. 
Miss Myra R. Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Mrs. Horace A. Guittard, 3871 Jack.son St. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Ha.ght St. 
William M. Reedy, 55 Fillmore St. 
Mrs. Mathew O. Tobriner. 3494 Jacksun St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harr.v D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurice Shean 

1545 - ISth Street. N.W.. Washington. D.C. 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Ijirkin HE 1-2121 

Meets 1st Monday of month at 3:45 I'.M. 

Harold L. Zellerbach. President, 1 Bush St. 
Bernard C. Begley M.D.. 450 Sutter St. 
Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 
Jo.seph Esherick, 2065 Powell St. 
Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 
John K. Hagopian. 220 Bush St. 
Betty Jackson, 2836 Vallejo St. 
William K. Knuth. 1600 Holloway Ave. 
Burton L. Rockwell. 60 Green St. 
Nell SInton, 1020 Francisco St. 

Ex-Officic Members 
Mayor 

President. California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning CommLsslon 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President, Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Executive Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

1110 Uirkin St. Hi': I 

.Meets every Thursday at 2:30 P.M. 

l.«uls Mark Cole, President, 1958 Vallejo SI. 
Alvin H. Baum. Jr., 2009 Green St. 
James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Mein, 315 Montgomery St. 
Mrs. diaries B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Offlcio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller, Secretary 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 Cltv Hail HE 1 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Hubert J. Sober, President, 155 Montgomery St.. 
Richard C. Ham, 200 Bush St. ( 



Wm. Kilpatrick, 827 Hyde St 



I. rviipiiLricK, Oil n>ue i^L. j 

George J. Grubb. General Manager. Pcrsonn 



EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Av.iiue 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday 
170 Fell St. 



Edward Kenimitt, President, 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Ijawrence Draper. Jr., 10 Walnut SI. 
Samuel A. Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 
Jlrs. Edward Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr., 351 California St. 
James E. Straiten, SOO Presidio Ave. 
Adolfo de Urioste, 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears, Supt. of Schools and .Sect 



FIRE COMMISSION 
2 City Hall 
Meets every Tuesday at 4 



Philip Dindia. President, 536 Br.vant St. 

Dr. Peter Angel, 1S67 - 15th Ave. 

Charles R. Greenstone, 182 Second St. 

William F. Murray, Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes, Chief, Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy, Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at i P.M. 

Frank J. Coliins.President, 2614 - 16th Ave. i 
George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell. M.D., 977 Valencia St. 
Donald J. McCook, 220 Montgomery St. 
Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Lyle J. O'Connell, Executive Director 



Ex-Officio Members 
Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 



.Icseph P. Mazzula. Chalnnan. 1021 Market St. 
John E. Gurich, 300 Montgomery St. 
Solomon E. Johnson, 704 Market St. 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P,M. 



ivid Thomson, Chairman. 65 Berry St. 

■Ihur S Becker. 3475 California St. 

)nald Magnin. 77 O'Farrcll St. 
Uaitzer Peterson. 2910 Vallejo St. 

hn E. Sullivan. 69 West Portal Ave. 
Vining T. P'isher, Director 
Thomas J. O'Toolo, Secretary 



ERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

227 (Mtv Hall 

Itcts eviiy Wedm-sdny at 3:00 P.M. 

lllinni II. H. llnvis, President, 084 Kolsnn 
lorge H. Olllln. 4091 - 10th Ave. 
Max Moore. 508 Potroro Ave. 
arcnco J. Walsh. 124 Delano Ave. 
•nest U West. 165 Marina Blvd. 
J. P>iwin Mattox. Executive Secretary 



>LICE COMMISSION 

8511 ISiynnl .slr,-,-t KI. :!-011 

Meets every .Monday at 6:00 P.M. 

irold U. McKlnnon, President. 265 California St. 

,ut A. Ulsslnger. 416 Sansonie St. 

in Fazaekerley. 851 Howard St. 
Thomas J. Cahlll, Chief of Police 
Alfred J. .Nelder. Deputy Chief of Police 
Capt. Cornelius P. Murphy. Chief of Inspectors 
I. Thomas Zaragoza. Director of Traffic 
Capt. John T. Butler. Department Secretary 
l.t. William J. O'Brien. Commission Secretary 



IBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 
Civic Center UK 1-2121 

Meets 1st Tuesday of month at 3:30 P.M. 

Iin M. Hransten. President. 6C5 - 3rd St. 

Morris Cox. Mills Tower 

. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 

Be M Fanucchl. 1445 Stockton St. 

irtlmer Flelshhacker. Jr.. 601 California St. 

irKaret V. Olrdner, 2130 Fulton St. 

ward B. Heavey. 68 Post St. 

Iton K. Lepetlch. 1655 Polk Street 

■8. J. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 

V. William Turner. 1642 Broderick St. 

onias W. S Wu. D.D.S.. nil Stockton St. 

Wlliuim U. Holnian. Librarian 

Frank A. Clarvoe. Jr.. Secretary 



IBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 
287 City Hall HE 1- 

Meeta every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

lart N. Greenbergr. President. 765 Polsom St. 

rt Simon. 1350 Folsom St. 

orge F. Hansen. 215 Market St. 

omas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 

onias F. Stack. 703 Market St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood, Manager of Utilities 

Jail - " 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

525 Golden Gale Ave. 
Meets every Tuesday at 3:3 



day at 3:30 P.l 



UN 3-775 



HE 1 



' J. Finn. Secretary 



Bureaus and Departments 
iounts, 287 City HaJl HB 1-2121 

Oeorge Negri, Dlreotor 

port. San Francisco International, S. P. 28 
Belford Brown, JIanager 761-0800 

Ich Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Oral L,. Moore. Gen. Mgr. Ketch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 

nicipal Railway, a4a Presidio Ave. PI 6-5656 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
rsonnel & Safety, aOl Presidio Ave. FI 6-6656 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
blic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
Iter Department, 426 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner, General Manager 

BLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

685 Bush St. EX 7-0000 

nd 3rd Thursday each month 



Ulam P. Scott. Jr., President, 249 Natoma St. 
Xavier Barrios. 2325 Ocean Ave. 

1 Blumenthal. 6K2 Mission St. 

3. Margaret R. Murray, 8 Ixicksley Drive 

I. Jacqueline Smith. 557 - 10th Ave. 
Ronald H. Born. Director of Public Welfare 
Mrs, Eulala Smith. Secretary to Commission 



CREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLaren Lodge. Golden Gate Park SK 1-4866 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 



iter A. Haas. Sr.. President. 98 Battery St. 

«r Bercut. 1333 Jones St. 

ry Margaret Casey, 532 Mission St. 

Ulam M. Coffman, 626 Market St. 

in F. Conway. Jr.. 3600 Third St. 
Francis J. Herz, 460 Sutter St. 

9. Joseph A. Moore. Jr., 20OO Washington St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell, General Manager 
Mary B. Connolly, Secretary to Commission 



Everett Griffin, Chairman, 465 California St. 

nes H Black, Jr., I Hush St. 
James A. Folger, III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter P. Kaplan. 836 Market St. 
Lawrence R. Palaclos. 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. ICxecutlve Director 

M. C. Hermann. Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

4.^0 McAllister St. HK l-2i; 

Meets every Wednesday at 2 I".M. 

James M. Hamiil, President, 120 Montgomery St. 
James M. Crane, 333 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Diez, 2261 - 36th Ave. 
William T. Reed. 2161 - isth Ave. 
Martin F. Wormuth, 410'J Pacheco 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secretary 



WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building M.-1 

Meets 2nd Thursday each iiionth at :i 1>. 

Ralph J. A. Stern. President. 434 Brannan St. 

Eugene D. Bennett, 226 Bush St. 

Philip S. Boone. 343 Sansomo 

Frederic Campagnoll, 300 Montgomery St. 

George T. Davis, 111 Sutter St. 

Frank A. Plynn, 1601 Noriega St. 

Prentis C. Hale, International liidg. 

Sam K. Harrison, 431 Bryant St. 

Harold E. Hubbard. 6100 Geary Blvd. 

Wilson Meyer, 333 Montgomery St. 

S.amuel D. Sayad. 35 Aptos Ave. 

Edward Sharkey, Managing Director 
E. Lawrence George. Executive Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building Hli 



eorge D. Culler. Dlr 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Raymond L. Bozzlni. Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 

Frank J. O'Connell, Market Master MI 7-9423 

CORONER 

860 Bryant St. KL 3-1694 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-80U0. Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk-Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin Mongan. 317 City Hail 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 376 City Hall 
Reflistrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 158 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

John J. Riordan, 150 Otis 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Currj-, Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou. Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

Louis A. Moran. Superintendent MO 4-I5S0 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. E. Albers. Superintendent Mi S-S200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake, Adm. Superintendent HE 1-2800 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hali HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 

R. Brooks I-arter, 

Assistant Director, Administrative 

3. Myron Tatarlan 

Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 
Accounts, 260 City Hail 

J.J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 265 City Hall HE 1- 

Charies W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 450 McAllister St. HB 1- 

Unliert C. ijcvy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army HE 1- 

A. If. l':kt.*nberK. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. 450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Slilney Franklin. Supervisor 
Egineenng. 359 City Hall HE 1- 

I'llff.iril J. Gcertz, City Engineer 
Sewer Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army ; 

Waller H. J<iii,». Supi-rlnlendeiit HE 1- 

Street Cleaning, 2;!i:i Army St. HK 1- 

Heniard .\1. (.fruity. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. Hli 1- 

Cli.irl. n AlcFadden. Acting Superintendent 
Urban Renewal. 450 McAllister St. HK 1- 

Beniard A. Cummlngs. Analyst 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 Clly Hall HE 1- 

Ben llenas. Purchaser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harrison Sts. 

J. K. Leary. Supervisor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 60 

George Stanley, Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 M.-Aliister St. HE 1- 

Philip L. Hezos. Director of Property 
James T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 City Hall HE 1- 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



2121 
2121 
2121 
2121 
2121 
2121 



2121 
2121 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park ba 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Dlreotor 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April. June. Oct 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President, 

2 Pine St. 
Mrs. Alexander Albert. 2320 Lyon St. 
E. Raymond Armsby, 2363 Larkln St. 
Louis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 
Joseph M. Bransten. 066 - 3rd St. 
Walter E. Buck. 235 Montgomery St. 
Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 
Mrs. Bruce Kelham, 16 Arguelio Blvd. 
Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 
David Pleydell-Bouverie. Glen Ellen. Calif 
Mrs. Henry Potter Hussell. 1420 Montgomery St 
John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 
William H. Wallace, 100 Bush St. 
Whitney Warren, 111 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach, 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 
President, Recreation & Park Commission 

Thomas Carr Howe, Jr., Director 

Capt. David J. Walsh, Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate I'ark BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. April. June. Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs. George Cameron, Honorary President, 
Hillsborough 

Avery Brundage. Honorary Trustee 

Miss Louise A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

R. Gwin Follis, 3690 Washington St. 

Clifford V. Heimbucher. 220 Bush St. 

Grover A. Magnin, St. Francis Hotel 

Garrett IMcEnerney. H. 444 California St. 

Roscoe F. Oakes. 220 Bush St. 

Charles Page. 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Filoli. San Mateo Co 

Joseph O. Tobln. 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burllngame Country Club 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Charles de Young Thlerlot, 1802 Floribunda, Hills- 
borough 

Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Richard Rheem. Director 
Col. Ian F. SI. Macalpine, Executive Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

„ ^"G City Hall HE 1-2121 

Robert J. Everson. librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. MA 1-1700 

Charles W. Friedrlchs, Executive Secretary 



BRUARY - MARCH, 196J 



MANCISO 

(Continued from Page 4 I 
about it. I'm hoping that some- 
thing develops shortly to relieve 
our situation. 

"We're called upon today to sei-v- 
ice 11 courts in addition to the 
psychiatric ward of San Francisco 
General Hospital and the mental 
hearings that are held. We don't 
even have extra help at vacation 
time." 

Because of the big case load, he 
said, it often is impossible for one 
deputy to follow through on a case. 
A defendant might find himself 
represented by as many as four 
different deputy Public Defenders 
during the course of his case wind- 
ing through the courts. 

Mancuso has repeatedly asked 
Mayor George Christopher to ap- 
prove his requests for more depu- 
ties, but the requests have not been 
filled. 

Mancuso is hopeful of getting 
more help, however, because study 
committees of the San Francisco 
Bar Association and the San Fran- 
cisco Lawyers Club have recom- 
mended that his proposals for a 
larger staff be approved immedi- 
ately. 

Despite a small staff, Mancuso 
said, the office is functioning ex- 
tremely well. "I've been success- 
ful in getting dedicated employees. 
And I follow through on all the 
cases by studying them to see they 
were properly handled." 

Recently, he said, he discovered 
a case where he thought a man 
had been sentenced improperly to 
prison. The case was brought back 
for a further hearing, and the de- 
fendant was released. 

The statistics for the last fiscal 
year show the work load of the 
Public Defender's office: 6476 de- 
fendants represented in misde- 



meanor cases, 2018 defendants rep- 
resented in felony cases in Muni- 
cipal Court hearings, and 1249 fel- 
ony cases handled in Superior 
Court. 

In addition, Mancuso seeks 
changes he feels are needed in the 
State's laws. 

He has said, for instance, that 
the narcotics problem should be 
treated primarily as a medical 
rather than a criminal problem 
a suggestion made recentaly by 
President Kennedy. 

In addition. Mancuso has pro- 
posed that bail be eliminated on 
most misdemeanor offenses, and a 
citation system substituted. This, 
he said, would save a huge amount 
of money, for those persons who 
can't post bail now are jailed — 
with resulting high expense to the 
city. 

In addition, he said, the bail 
system is imfair for another rea- 
son: "How often do you find a per- 
son of the upper economic classes 
brought in on a drunk chai'ge? 

"We try to get legislation ac- 
cepted that will protect people's 
rights." A key part of his work is 
done as chairman of the American 
Bar Association's Committee on 
Indigent Persons. 

Why did Mancuso give up a 
lucrative law practice to become 
Public Defender ? 

"I enjoy helping people and these 
people really need help," he said. 
"A lot of good citizens of the com- 
munity get themselves involved 
with the law. We don't look at 
the people who come in as crim- 
inals. We help anyone who is con- 
sidered indigent in the sense they 
can't afford to have an attorney. 

"I feel that in a job like this I'll 
leave more behind me than if I just 
carried on my private practice, and 
I'll serve my community a whole 
lot better," Mancuso said. 



FRENCH and DANISH PASTRIES — SPECIAL OCCASION CAKES 
Phone JU 5-9213 

RED CHERRY RAKERY 



Discounts for All Chur. 
4617 MISSION STREET 



. Clubs and Organizations 

SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF. 



FOSTER and KLEISER 

DivLsion of Metromedia, Inc. 

167'; EDDY STREET 
San Francisco 19, California 



McCoy Church Goods Co., Inc. 

Catholic Supplies and Religious Articles 

GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

111 Golden Gate Ave. UN 3-7080 San Francisco 



Bay Counties Title Guaranty Co. 



131-135 HAYES STREET 



PERSONALIZED SERVICb FOR TITLL INSURANCi: 
.ind BUSINESS ESCROWS 



San Francisco, Calif. 



UNderhill 3-2120 



CALIFORNIA WATER & TELEPHONE CO. 

300 MONTGOMERY ST. 

San Francisco, California 

CONSOLIDATED PURCHASING 
& DESIGNING CO. 

235 MONTGOMERY STREET 

EX. 2-4992 S.'\N FRANCISCO 

Phone JUno 9-1880 

AIRPORT DRAYAGE COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
SAN FRANCISCO 28, CALIFORNIA 

AIR FREIGHT . . . Door-to-Door 

OFFICIAL PICKUP - DELIVERY SERVICE 

BAKER GLASS ... San Francisco 

"You can see through our product" 

!5 YE.ir.i of Faithful Service to San Francisco Motori.«» 

EXPERIENCE - INTEGRITY - DEPENDABILITY 

678 EDDY STREET ORdway 3-9636 

(CLOSE TO CIVIC CENTER) 

CINCOTTA BROTHERS 

Distributors 

MARINE HARDWARE - FISHERIES SUPPLIES 

169 JEFFERSON STREET 

San Francisco 11, California 

Brand,: MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone: PRospcct 5-8977 



THE RECORI 



NTRIES CLOSED FOR 
UNIOR GRAND NATIONAL 



Willi till- 



:)!• onli 



for 



le Jmiioi- Grami National, last 
eek, totals revealed 1,371 yoiing- 
;ers will exhibit 2.863 animals at 
le Cow Palace. April 6-10. 
The exhibitors, who range in age 
■oni 10 to 21. are members of 4-H 
lubs or Future Farmers of Amer- 
a throughout the State of Cali- 
irnia. 

The 4-H clubs, represented by 
!9 girls and 337 boys from 41 
lunties will exhibit 240 beef 
ittle. 297 dairy cattle. 402 lambs 
Id 248 hogs, for a toal of 1.187 
limals. 

In the FFA division, 705 boys 
irolled in vocational agricultural 
asses in 75 high schools have en- 
red 327 beef cattle, 288 dairy 
.ttle. 443 lambs, and 618 hogs, 
r a total of 1.676 animals. 
Judging of the animals will be- 
n at 8 a.m. Saturday. April 6, 
id should be completed by Tues- 
ly. April 9. A public auction of 
e animals will be held on Tuesday 
r all hogs, and on Wednesday for 
mbs and steers. 

In addition to the livestock judg- 
? and auction sales, the Junior 
•and National includes three 
ena performances on the week- 
d. featuring the San Francisco 
ilice Dogs, the Junior Grand Na- 
inal Hoise Show and greased pig 
d calf scrambles. 



STORYLAND NOW OPEN 

Storyland. San Francisco's magic 
world of make-believe for children, 
is now open for the 1963 season, 
the San Francisco Recreation and 
Park Department announced today. 

Storyland is open from 10 a.m. 
to 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays through 
Sundays, and is closed Monday ami 
Tuesday. It is also open on all holi- 
days and all seven days of the week 
during Easter and summer vaca- 
tions. 

Admission is ten cents for chil- 
dren 12 years of age and vmder. 
and 15 cents for anyone over 12 
years of age. 

Storyland. located at Sloat Boul- 
evard and 45th Avenue, is adjacent 
to Fleishhacker Zoo and Playfield, 
and may be reached by the "L" 
street car or the "18" i Sloat) bus. 



RANDOLPH MARKET 

Your Friendly Neighborhood Stoi 

345 RANDOLPH ST. 

JU. 5-4649 

FREE DELll'ERY 



TOYO CLEANERS 

PLANT ON PREMISES 
PICKUP and DELIVERY 
GARMENTS INSURED 
1 - 14th St. MA. 1-0313 



P&S LIQUOR STORE 

Ask for NICK 
DOMESTIC and IMPORTED 
LIQUORS ■ WINES ■ BEER 

100 - 24th St. \'.\. 4-6431 



KAY'S CLUB 

Cocktail Lounge 

529 VALENCIA ST. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



(omplinienls 

of a 
FRIEND 



Tokyo 1964 

loin the OLMYPIC 

SAl'INGS CLUB 

. . . ■i OUR TICKET TO THE 

OLYMPIC GAMES 

FOR DETAILS VISIT OR 

CALL YOUR FRIENDLY 

SUMITOMO BANK 



THE SUMITOMO BANK 
of CALIFORNIA 

An American Bank 
Incorporated in California 



SAN JOSE— 224 Jackso 
Phone 298-6116 

Itmhcr: Federal Reserve Sy 
FeJer.il Derrisit Insurance 



THE SAN FRANCISCO 
HEART ASSOCIATION 

jses gifts and bequests to support 
•esearch. education and community 
iervice in fighting the Nation's No. 

disease. 
259 GE.^RY ST. YU. 2-5753 



Black & White Garage 

PARKING 
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE 

955 POST ST. 
PR. 5-9680 S.m Fr.incisco 



HESS 
Cigar & Liquor Store 

Don and Carlene 

Domestic & Imported Liquors 
2280 Chestnut St. WE. 1-8668 



BUSY BEE MEATS 

VERNE YOUNG 

18th and VALENCIA 

Phone UNdcrhill 1-4883 



WESTLAKE INSURANCE & AGENCY, INC. 

W'.MI i.K F. BkoIIIF (Kill Staii 

?fi Rirk Plaza Drive PL. 5-71 H 

Daly City, Calii-ornia 



KITCHEN REMODELING 

Cahiiiiili e Buiilin Appliances - Store Fronts & Fixtures 

PETER D. SCATENA, INC. 

1265 SHAFTER AVENUE MI. 8-8830 

SCULLY DRUG CO. 

Owl Rexal Drugs - Eranchised Dealer 

136 GEARY STREET 
SUtter 1.J090 San Francisco 8, California 

1770 Fulton Street - 948 Market Street - 2598 Mission Street 

WEINSTEIN CO. 

1041 MARKET STREET 

YOUR FRIENDLY DEPARTMENT STORS 

BRANCHES: 

100 Market Street 820 Clement Street 

615 Market Street 130 West Portal 

1620 Polk Street 







Claude Berhouet .ind Claudine Berhouct, Props. 


<m 


i^7 


i 


o 


Hotel de France 


J 


w' 


BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 


i 


k--^ 


780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 


-^ 


Telephone GA 1-6410 





DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF. 

Stveetheart Hams and Bacon 
''Idaho Quality Fed Beef*' 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



IRUARY - MARCH, 1963 



KENDRICK HALI. 

(Continued from PaRc 2i 
aiivocary, required of all students. 
Here's how it works: 

After completing the course in 
preparing and presenting cases be- 
fore trial and appelate courts, 
teams of two students compete in 
an appelate procedure. The facts 
of the case are prepared by fac- 
ulty members and senior students. 
Each docket or set of two teams 

is provided with a different fact 
situation. 

Each team prepares a written 
argument, or brief, which is sub- 
mitted in advance to the three 
judges who will hear the oral 
argument. The jurists' panel con- 
sists of a Bay Area judge or at- 
torney, a faculty member and a 
senior law student. 

A decision is handed down in 
each case. The student is judged 
on his brief, his pleading before 
the moot court, and other factors 
important in a good attorney. 

Moot court proceedings are held 
each year during November and 
December and are open to the 
public. 

Kendrick Hall's moot court pro- 
gram is administered by a student 
board with a faculty moderator. 



Mcmbcis are five senior day stu- 
dents and five from the evening 
division, all selected for high schol- 
astic standing and competence in 
legal advocacy. 

USF engages in moot court com- 
petition with other Bay Area law 
schools, and its teams have won 
state and national honors. In 1959 
a team went to the national finals 
in New York. Jurists headed by 
Supreme Court Justice Potter 
Stewart judged the USF appelate 
brief fourth best among 100 sub- 
mitted. 

Kendrick Hall, the newest addi- 
tion to the university, was dedi- 
cated in official ceremonies Sept. 
29. 1962 which coincided with the 
golden anniversary of the law col- 
lege. 

The five-story structure was des- 
ignated by architect Milton Pfleu- 
ger and required fifteen months to 
build at a total cost of $1.5 million. 
Its construction was made possible 
by a gift to the university from 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kendrick. 

From its humble beginning in a 
Market Street office building, the 
School of Law had never had a 
home of its own. Kendrick Hall, 
the law school's fifth dwelling in 
the past five decades, is its first 
permanent one. 




Anolher view of Kcndricl< Hall moot i presented by Rev. Timothy L. Mc- 
court room w.ns taken during current Donnell, S.J., (at right), USF political 
teachers' course on Communism beiny I science .issociate professor. 



CORA LOU CONFECTIONS 

Allegeretti Bittersweet 
Chocolates 

Sebbelow Fine Danish 
Confections 

414 CASTRO ST., near Market 
UN. 3-3651 
San f-ratuifco 



Mar Vista 
Pharmacy 

David R. Zisko 

Always at your Service for 
All Your Drug Needs 

5035 TARAVAL STREET 
OV. 1. 1 300 



SHREVE & CO. 

Jewelers 

POST &. GRANT AVENUE GA 1-2600 

SAN FRANCISCO 

INDUSTRIAL CARPENTERS UNION, LOCAL 2565 

Charlercil hy Utiilid Brolherhooil of Carpenters and joiners of America 

Affiliated with S.F. Building 8C Construction Trades Council - California 

State Council of Carpenters - Bay Counties Dist. Council of Carpenters 

California State Labor Federation ■ Union Labor Party 

3608 ■ 19th Street San Francisco 10, California MArket 1-7819 



MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

All Types Broom Fibres and Wire — For Street Sweepers, Street Push 

Brooms — Street Flushers and Sewer Cleaning Equipment 

GEORGE L. AVERY 

4516 HOLLIS ST.-OAKLAND 8. CALIFORNIA-OLympic 4-5254 
Mme. J. G. DUPORT 

MODEL FRENCH LAUNDRY 

1861 UNION STREET 
Phone WEst 1-5984 San Francisco 9, California 

CASTAGNOLA Fine Sea Food Reslaiiranl 

Andrew B. Castagnola PRospect 6-5015 San Francisco 11 

FOOT OF JONES STREET - FISHERMAN'S WHARF 

CRAB STAND - PRospect 5-1040 

NATHALIE NICHOLI, Inc. 
Manufacturers of Dresses 



1663 MISSION STREET 



UNderhill 3-8660 



PETERSON SUPPLY CO. 

7s[eo)i Sign Supplies and Equipment 
480 Fifth Street DOuglas 2-1695 

S.-^N FRANCISCO 7. CALIFORNIA 

P.MII. \VHITM.\R.SH 

T&W Enameling Company 

LACQUER and BAKED ENAMEL FINISHES 

TO SPECIFICATION — S.\ riSFACTION GUARANTEED 

MI. 8-1595 1562 BANCROFT 

E.ist o( S-'OO BK«k . ird Strtet 

NAfRFI) IIFAHT HKill SCHOOL 

1075 ELLIS STREET 
S.^N Francisco, California 



THE RECORl 



'Heart Presumption' 
Advocated by 
Senator McAteer 

The duties of the modern day 
policeman and fireman are very 
diffiiult and hazardous. 

For that reason. 1 have lalton 
the lead in advocating in the State 
Legislature a "Heart Presumption" 
bill. 

My bill provides that any police 
officer, or fire fighter, who, after 
ten years of service, suffers a 
heart attack or pneumonia, would 
have a "conclusive presumption" in 
regard to the illness. 

Thus a policeman, or fireman, 
with a decade of service, would no 
longer be required to prove that 
his heart attack, or pneumonia, 
arose out of his employment, as 
is now the case. It would be con- 
clusively presumed in his favor. 

The problems of San Francisco 
policemen and firemen are well 
known to me because so many of 
them are my friends. Having been 
raised in the Mission District. I 
A'ent to school with and partici- 
pated in athletics with many of 
those now working in both de- 
partments. 

Because of this, I know the 
rigors and hardship to which they 




J. EUGENE "Gene" McATEER 

are subjected on their job. They 
are constantly under stress be- 
cause danger is something that 
they can unexpectedly meet at any 
time. 

When a policeman walks down a 
dark alley, or a fireman enters a 
burning building, he faces many 
dangerous situations. 

Too often these situations have 
caused fatalities and serious in- 
jury, as wel las numerous heart 
and pneumonia cases. 

My "heart-pneumonia" bill, as it 
is sometimes called, will also cover 
deputy sheriffs, members of the 
Highway Patrol and other selected 
law enforcement and fire fighter 
groups. 



GREENS' EYE HOSPITAL 



1801 BUSH STREET 



WE. 1-4300 



San Francisco 



Frederick Meiswinkle, Inc. 

CONTRACTING PLASTERERS 

2155 TURK STREET JO. 7-4694 

San Francisco, California 



PAUL PARENT! AND 
BRUNO PASSAGLIAS 

Complete Dinner 



NEW VILLA CAPRI 
2.50 



Chefs Special 
Chonged Doily 



SERVING FINE ITALIAN CUISINE - 
2100 TARAVAL (In the PARKSIDE) 



Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Esl.nblished I89> 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 
Executive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street IJNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, California 



• 24-Hour Line Service — • Aircraft Storage 

• Approved Electronic Center 

• Maintenance and Overhaul 



1 1 1 n I 

T OPERATIONS b fcj -5SJ£«ri: 



iTtEEiltrriir 




BUTLER AVIATION -- 
SAN FRANCISCO INC. 

San Francisco International Airport 
Executive Aircraft Terminal 

San Francisco 28, Calif. Telephone: JUno 3-8300 

THE lOWRIE PAVING CO., INC. 

J. F. Lowrie, President — J.imes W. Lowrie, Vice-President 

San Francisco Yard. 2170 O.ikd.nle Ave. S.nn Francisco 24, Calif. 
R. J. Kilroy, Superintendent 

General Contractor 

Grading — Paving — Underground Construction 

Main Office and Yard: Lowrie Avenue, South San Francisco, Calif. 
(415) PO. 1-2265 (415) JU. 3-3574 

BONAIRE RESTAURANT 

"Su/it'rh Sandwichijs and Excellent Coffee" 

536 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



FEBRUARY - MARCH, 1963 



BAY WENDOW 

(Continued from Page 3i 

Will he make it ? Will this hair 
stylist deliLxe be able to climb the 
peaks of politics most pristine and 
sit proudly in that chair so recent- 
ly made warm by the likes of 
George. Elmer, Roger and Angelo ? 

We shall see. But. bashomalee! 
Here we go off on a tangent while 
you and all our other regular read- 
ers (that would be Paul: Linda- 
Mae, who is Paul's wife: and Joey- 
Boy are perhaps confused. 

If not confused, please start over 
again. It's easy. 

Like, man, here is a great city. 
Great, man. Real great and way- 
out and real low-down and oh, you 
cat. like. 

And here comes along James 
Leo. saying "no." "no, " mind you 
after years piled upon years of 
such distinguished service that 
even political rival Christopher re- 
marked: "He has contributed im- 
measureably to the welfare of San 
Francisco." 

It has been a shock, all right. 
And what other shocks are in store 
for us this year? Certainly it was 
with relief galore that we accepted 
the news from the City Hall's third 
floor that Municipal Judge Lenore 
Underwood had decided not to run 
for mayor after all. Yes. repeat: 
NOT. 

Well, with Judge Undei-wood defi- 
nitely in the I-Refuse-To-Run ranks 
even before she had been drafted, 
actually, that narrows the field so 
much that the most we can expect 
is a real .spirited contest between 
Supervisor Dobbs and Congress- 
man Shelley, 

Only, possibly, George Marion- 
etti — one of the partners of Fior 
d'ltalia, that part of Italy that will 
always be North Beach — may be 



drafted at the last moment. With 
Joe Alioto, the well known attor- 
ney of Redevelopment and Educa- 
tion fame, as director of the cam- 
paign. And Renato Marrazzini of 




Congressman 
JACK SHELLEY 

L'ltalia as honorary chairman of 
the Committee Seeking Planks for 
a Platform. 

Thus it would appear that al- 
thought All is Not Lost, it soon 
may be. And our closing words 
are grouped so as to form a very 
cordial invitation to you and yours 
— provided that you are all of effec- 
tive age — to by all means file for 
election to Something! It's the 
only way to beat posterity! Thank 
you. 



HILDRETH'S PHARMACY 

Prescription SpecialisH 
Sick Room Supplies 
Drugs - Sundries 

2998 MISSION STREET 
MI, 7-1289 



ED LINGSCH, Realtor 

l.Lt r- H.indle Yi.ur 

Real Estate Problems 

3232 MISSION STREET 

MI 8-1516 



BRADLEY CAMERA 

SALES - SERVICE 

BudKCt Pr.ce^ 
1126 MARKET STREET 
HE 1-7476 

Gold Spike Restaurant 

GA 1-9363 

527 COLUMBUS 

San Francisco 

TRICOLOR 
FRENCH RESTAURANT 

Dinner after 4 P.M. - Clo^ed Mon, 
4233 Geary Blvd. BA 1-8707 



EDDIES CAFE 

Breakfast- Lunch - Dmncr 

Short Orders 

Eddie Barrie, Owner 

1420 Turk Street FI 6-5004 



CIVIC CENTER LUNCH 

EXCELLEN FOOD 

Kurt Silvcr.stcin, Prop. 

500 Van Ness Ave., cor. McAllister 

MArket 1-7447 San Francisco 



CATCHER'S Min 

COCKTAILS 

6221 - 3rd STREET 
San Francisco, California 



CITY REFRIGERATION CO. 

S.ALES - SERVICE 

24-H()ur Service 

Commercial - Apartment House 

41 LASKIE STREET 

KL 2-3536 San Francisco 



GEARY MOTORS 


THE HONGKONG 


New 1963 Fords 


AND SHANGHAI 




BANKING 


Highest Quality Used Cars 


CORPORATION 


Lowest Prices 


OF CALIFORNIA 


Lowest Down Payments 




Longest Terms 


A Subsidiary of The Hongkong Bank 


4700 GEARY BLVD, 


Group which has more than 140 




offices throughoul the world . . . 


BA, 1-2300 


X"i&"''"-. 


H. WENIGER 




1 ft^^^^p-w J 


Manulaclurers oj 


\ \ '^^^tlf ^ 


Instruments for Hand Surgery 


'*'r-fjTw'v\»' 


Active Hand SC Finger Splints 


^i^^^ 


70 12111 STREET 






80 SUTTER STREET 


MA 1-6876 






San Francisco 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 


SCAVENGERS' 
PROTECTIVE 




ASSOCIATION. INC. 


Custom-Aire 


2550 MASON STREET 


Products 


EX 2-3859 






Division of Pacific Industries, inc. 
Manufacturers of 


MIKE INOUYE'S 


RICHFIELD SERVICE 


Forced Air - Gas Fired Heaters 
& Wall Furnaces 


Tune Up & Repairs — Tires 
Batteries — Accessories 


Air Conditioning 


PICKUP a: DEUVERY 


• 


1999 Pine St, San Francisco, Cal. 




WAInut 1-2825 


600 Indiana Street 

VA 6.717T 


OTAGIRI 


MERCANTILE CO., INC. 






RAYMUND Q. WONG 


OUR NEW ADDRESS 






INSURANCE BROKER 


1400 FOLSOM STREET 






fire - Liability - Life - Auto 


Corner of 10th HE. 1-9555 






WESTERN LIFE INSURANCE 

r'OMPAfSIV 


Visit the BEAUTIt-UL 


818 CLAY STREET 


SHADOW BOX LOUNGE 

Meet MARION KOZAK, 


Bus: GA 1-3975 


BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 


OTIS JARMAN 
and JULIAN CURSEY 


specialists on Wheel Alignment 




Brakes and Motor Tune-up 


3535 CALIFORNIA .ST, 


MACHINE SHOP 


SK, 1-9091 


515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-7020 




Bill Barca San Francisco 



THE RECORD 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 31 
, . . " which was spelled Pi'ograninn' 
inside, was produced by Leon 
Friedman. 714 Market St.. and sold 
for ton cents. It measured seven 
by ten inches and had 16 pages 
with names of meet officials, judges 
and groundskecpers, and pictures 
and biographies of noted fliers at- 
tending the show, as well as 
"Schedule and Conditions of 
Prizes," and "Aeroplane Records" 
— "which may be broken at the 
coming meet" and weren't. 

To show you what the state of 
the flying art was during 1911. 
here are excerpts from the Aero- 
nautical Distionary: 

"The first airmail in the United 
States was carried by Earle Oving- 
ton from Nassau Boulevard Air- 
drome. Long Island, to Mineola. 
Long Island. Deliveries were con- 
tinued for one week. 

"A list of certified pilots. 7 years 
after the Wright Biothers had 
demonstrated the practicability of 
flight, showed France with 353; 
England, 57; Germany, 46: Italy. 
32; Belgium. 27; and the United 
States. 26. 

"McCurdv, United States, flew 



from Key West, Florida, to the 
shore near Habana, Cuba, a dis- 
tance of 100 miles in two hours. 

"M. P. Prier. France, made the 
first non-stop flight from London 
to Paris. 2,'JO miles, in 3 hours, 56 
minutes. 

"The Frenchman, Garros, set an 
altitude record of 12,959 on Sept. 
17. 

"Calpreth P. Rodgers started 
Sept. 17 from New York on the 
first flight across the United 
States, landing at Pasadena on 
November 5. after numerous forced 
landings." 

The Pacific Aeio Club wa.sn't 
about to let non-flying men and 
machines enter the Tanforan con- 
tests. "Preliminary: Before a can- 
didate will be allowed to enter the 
trial flights, a preliminary flight 
must be held in which the aviator 
shall demonstrate to the satisfac- 
tion of the Committee that he can 
make one continuous flight of 500 
yards, and after stopping his en- 
gine, land within a distance of 150 
.yards from a previously designated 
spot." 

Nobody got hint at the Tanforan 
meet, but Latham ran his Antoin- 
ette into a fence. 



Mi Rancho Super Market 

Latin-.^mcrican F.u.ds 

3365 - 20th STREET 

MI 7-0581 

San Francisco. California 



Greetings 

from 

WALTER B. KREUTZMANN 



KOTZBECK GALLERIES 

Fine Prints - Expert Framing 

OriKinaU in Water Colors 

and Oils 

2031 Fillmore St. H 6-5620 



TELEPHONE MARKET 

Groceries - Produce 

Liquor - Wine - Beer 

2895 PINE STREET 

JO -■9679 



PIERRE'S 

Your H„sts: 

.Maurice Bcs^iere and Dick B(.vd 

546 BROADWAY 

DO 2-7763 

MODERN 

CHINESE RESTAURANT 

20c to 40i per dish 

Open 1(1-.^ p.m. 

735 Jackson St. SU 1-9730 



FORTUNE CLEANERS 

2751 - 21st Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Paul's Wilstiire Service 

2101 - 19th Avenue 
MO. 1-3022 



San Francisco Conservatory 
of MUSIC 

DR. ROBIN LAUFER 
1201 Ortega St. LO. 4-8086 



TIN YIN IAN & CU. 

Barbecued Pork and Sparcribs 
1041 Stockton St. YU. 2-3348 



D. CAPPELIETTI 

Contractor and Builder 



379 Shotwell St. 



BETH'S BEAUTY SALON 

Complete Bcauly Scrrice 



Al DELICATESSEN 

1450 Haight St. MA. 1-7371 



All Nations 
BARBER SHOP 

1440 TURK STREET 



OLD CHELSEA FISH & CHIPS 

B«el SL PorL Pics 

952 LARKIN STREFT 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PHIL EGAN 

Wal.h. Clork a; Jfwclri' Rrp.urln 
511 VALENCIA STREET 
HE 1.875! S.in Fr.ii 



SHKEVE 
&C0. 

Jewelers 

* 

Post and Grant Avenue 

GA. 1-2600 

San Francisco 



Fredericks Paint Shop 

AUTO PAINTING and 
BODY REBUILDING 

645 Eighteenth St., near }rd Si. 
E. FREDERICK 



Bonnies Home 
for the Aged 

Mrs. Bonnie Nesbil. Mgr.Owner 
1125 Geneva Ave. JU. 5-8679 



RICHMOND 
NURSING HOME 



2621 CLEMENT ST. 
SK. 2-1628 San Francisco 



JAY BRIGGS 

Fabulous Mens Clothe: 

61 POST ST. 

40 STONESTOWN 



LINDENS MARKET 

CHOICE MEATS 
Imported i Domestic Delicatessen 

Beer and Fine Wines. 
FRANK JOHANSON. New Owner 

2200 - 15th STREET 
UN. 1-5912 San Francisco 



ROY L. STRONG 
Chevron Service 



1799 Ocean Av 



STACY'S 
Roundhouse Restaurant 

Golden Gate Bridge. San Franc 



PERSONALITY HAT STORE 

3210 - 2 1 St Street 
MI. 7-5009 



GREEK ■ AMERICAN 
VETERAN CLUB 

161 EDDY STREET 



CONSTRUCTION 
AGGREGATES 
CORPORATION 

Telephone DOugla.s 3-1718 
505 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 5, Calif. 



LOU FREMY 
Incorporated 



s' Distributor 



DRUGS. COSMETICS an 
ALLIED PRODUCTS 



YUkon 6-4526 
330 RITCH STREET 



REAL ESTATE 



INSURANCE 



FRANK 

BLDG. & LAND CORP. 

TWX-SF 1174 

F. C. FRANK. Contractor 

1500 GENEVA AVENUE 

DE. 3-1230 San Francisco 24 

MAHEUCCI BROS. 
York Meat Market 

CHOICE MEATS, 
POULTRY. FISH and EGGS 

2794 - 24th STREET 
VA. 4-5419 



A&C 

Upholstering 

3170 - 16th STREET 
MI. 8-3906 



First 

Presbyterian 

Church 

Reyerend E. »'. Rimley 

''-•n Ness at Sacramento .^' 
PR. 6-555J 



FEBRUARY . MARCH, 1963 



MAiLLIARD ASKS VIEWS 
or CONSTITUENTS 







WILLIAM S. MAILLIARD 
Congressman 4th District 

Congressman William S. Mail- 
liard of San Francisco announced 
that he is mailing a questionnaire 
to many of his constituents 
throughout the city, asking for 
their views on some of the most 
controversial questions to be con- 
sidered by the 88th Congress. Tax 
reduction and the national debt, 
medical care for the aged, labor- 
management relations, and federal 
aid to education are the subjects 
covered by this year's question- 
naire, which should arrive in the 
city during the early part of next 
week. 

"In the past," said Congressman 
Mailliard. "the views of my con- 
stituents as presented in their 
answers to my questionnaires have 
been most helpful to me in my 
efforts to represent them in Wash- 
ington." The Congressman will 
.send the results of his survey to 
all those constituents who request 
it. 



Electronic Training Laboratory 

All phau-s of EUctronki. 

lull or part-time 

EUclronici-TV for Men, fVomen 

(111 Bro.idw.iy OL. 8-1114 

OAKLAND 



KOTZBECK GALLERIES 

rinc Prints - Expert Fr.iining 

Originals in Water Colors 

anil Oils 



21HI Filln 



St. 



ri. 6-5620 



INDEPENDENT 
MEXICO CITY CAEE 

IVe Specialise in Genuine 

MEXICAN FOOD 

\-')Z H.iight St. BA. I-'i'jI- 

S.in Ir.incisK. 



BAYHA, WEIR & FINATO, INC. 

.Mcch.,nic.il t' Elcctricl 
Engineers 

SI2 HOWARD STREET 

YUkon 2-1200 

RUDY KLAVER 

I-irst Class .Atitoniobile Painting 

I12'5 STEINER STREET 

Telephone JO 7-4396 

San Francisco 



THE IDEAL HOTEL 



Clean - Comfortable 
Economical 



IJ34 STOCKTON ST. 

SU. 1-9613 



ROYAL BAKING CO. 

4773 MISSION STREET 

JU 5-9655 

SAN FRANCISCO 



lAf- DAVID" 

RADIO and TV SERVICE 

H..mc ApplKinccv 
1051 Polk St. TU 5-1750 



ELECTRONIC TRAINING LABORATORY 

Elcctninics • TV-Col. .r 
Communications 

Residence Trade School Approved 
for Veterans 

4111 Broadway OL8-ni4 



GEORGE KWOK - General Agent 

Manhattan Life Insurance Co., N.Y. 

752 SACRAMENTO ST. 
EX 2-0989 



Scannell Bros., Drayage 

Carroll Ave. and Ingalls 

V.A 4-2006 

San Francisco, Calif. 



MAR VISTA PHARMACY 

■■Let Us Help Supply Your 
l-.imily Nceds^' 

DAVID ZISKO. Prop 

10 55Taraval St. OV. 1-13 30 



WALLACE'S 
UNION SERVICE 

1998 MARKET STREET 
KLondike 2-2861 San Francisco 



DELEIIW. 


CATHEIi & COMPANY 




CONSULTING 


ENGINEERS 


Pnhli. 


Transit 




Subways 


Traff, 


. & Parki, 


K 


Railroad Facilities 


E.pre 


ssnays 




Industrial Plants 


Grade 


Separatio 


«.. 


Municipal iVorks 


Urha, 


Renewal 




Port Derelopment 






rssajf 



12.56 Market Strett 
San Francisco 2, California 

Chicago Newari 

COATES, HERFURTH & ENGLAND 

Consulting Actuaries 

CROCKER BUILDING - SAN FRANCISCO 4 

Offices in San Francisco, Denver, Pasadena 

Telephone SUtter 1-1724 

IronDuke 

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 5 - 0:iO P.M., SAT. 10:iO P.M. 



132 BUSH 



DO. 2-4484 



MONTEBELLO WINE CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

Producers of and Dealers in Choice California Wines 

WINERY: ST. HELENA, NAPA COUNTY 

Office: 2505 BRY.\NT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

di Gioia Clinical & Research 
Laboratories 



350 POST STREET 



YUkon 6-018? 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Ocean Shore Iron Works 
Complete Boiler & Tank Repair 



1660 JERROLD AVENUE 



Mission 7-57 3- 



Grcc'tnit;,s- 
Joseph J. Divinv, Vtcc-Prci^idcnt 

INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS 

25 TAYLOR STREET GR. 4-6344 



THE RECORD 



G&E Answers 
ueries About 
odega Plant 

Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
ny today replied to questions 
Ised publicly in recent weeks by 
rsons opposing the Company's 
5,000-kilowatt atomic power 
int at Bodega Bay in Sonoma 
lunty. The Company made public 
e list of questions and provided 
nciso. factual replies. 
"The facts should reassure any- 
e concerned that the Bodega 
omic plant will not constitute 
threat or hazard to Sonoma 
lunty residents or anyone else," 
id Norman R. Sutherland, presi- 
nt of PG&E. "If we had any 
ubts about this, the plant would 
t be built," he added. 
PGcfeE withheld its replies to 
arges made by some of the proj- 
t's apponents. stating that it 
luld not be legally proper to 
gue its case in public while it 
IS under formal consideration by 
e CPUC. 

"To meet our responsibility of 
rving this fast-growing area of 
e Nation's largest state," Suth- 
land continued, "we find com- 




NORMAN SUTHERLAND 

pelling reasons to develop nuclear- 
fueled electric power generation. 
Atomic power has a proven record 
of safety and dependabilit.y. and we 
are convinced that its use will be 
economical as well. 

"Into the Bodega plant will go 
the knowledge and experience we 
have gained at the PG&E-General 
Electric atomic plant at Vallecitos, 
during the design and construction 
of our new Humboldt Bay nuclear 
unit, and through our participation 
in other nuclear projects," he 
stated. "This will be augmented by 
(Continued on Page 18) 



MArkct 1-1400 FREE ESTIMATES 

TED'S 

Auto Body and Fender Repair 

1570 WALLER STREET 
T. F. SANCHEZ SAN FRANCISCO 17, CALIF. 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY 

General Office: CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 

MOTOR TRUCKS 

Addrea Reply to: BRANCH SALES OFFICE 

610 Brann.nn Street — San Fr.incisco 7. Californi.i 

BLAIR EXCLUSIVE 

Piano Movers 



1894 FOLSOM STREET 



PROOOCTION, ELECTRONICS & 

AERO-DYNAMIC LODGE 1327 

I. A. of M., AFL-CIO 



New Method Laundry & Dry Cleaners 

All Tour Laundering and Clcanintj, Prohlcms 

Solved with One Call. 

MA. \-OUS 407 Sanchc:: Street 

Thomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
LOmbard 4-0180 



Basketball, Baseball, Football, Softball, Golf, Trad, Tennis, Bowline 
Uniforms, Trop'iies SC Medals, Ski Rentals, Hunting. Flshinc 

FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 



H04 TARAVAL STREET San Francisco 16, Calif. 



MOntrose 1.IW9 



North Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4634 



EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Newest Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational View 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-2928 

Reasonable Rates — Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 



GLEN PARK SELF-SERFICE LAUNDRY 

CLARA POLTMAN 

2«42 diamond St. Telephone JU 7-569? San Francisco. Calif. 



BRUARY - MARCH, 1963 



p.(;.&.E. 

(Continued from Page 17) 

the shared experience of other 
nuclear and non-nuclear compon- 
ents of the plant. "The vast ex- 
peiience and excellent record of 
G-E. one of the world's foremost 
manufacturers of nuclear reactors 
and atomic equipment, will con- 
tribute greatly to our pooled tech- 
nological knowledge." he added. 

"As a final check on the safely 
of the Bodega plant." said Suther- 
land, "the U.S. Atomic Energy 
Commission will examine our de- 
sign and construction plans in 
minute detail. PG&E must satisfy 
the AEC completely that the 
Bodega plant will be built in strict 
conformity with regxilations cover- 
ing reactor safety." 

Turning to other features of the 
Bodega project, the PG&E presi- 
dent stated: 

"Our Bodega Bay Atomic Park 
will be a park in fact as well as in 
name. The plant itself will occupy 
only a small portion of Bodega 
Head, and the remaining acres will 
be made accessible to the public. 

"The concern of conservation- 
minded persons that the Head 
might be 1st to public enjoyment 
is unfounded," he declared. "The 
opposite is true. In past years. 



while the headlands were pi-ivately 
owned by others, the public never 
had free access to the areas which 
PG&E now owns. Now, for the first 
time, our access road and other 
detailed planning for public access 
after the plant is in operation will 
make the Atomic Park a recrea- 
tional and educational asset for the 
enjoyment of everyone," said Suth- 
erland. 

"As for the concern expressed 
about the possible effects of the 
atomic plant on marine biology in 
the Bodega area," he continued, 
"the University of California's se- 
lection of a site adjacent to the 
atomic plant for its Bodega Marine 
Laboratoi-y is of great significance. 

"It is indicative of the fact that 
the University feels the marine 
ecology of the region will not suf- 
fer because of the presence of the 
plant, and we will cooperate to the 
fullest with the University to this 
end." he concluded. 

Opposition to the Bodega project 
first was shown last April when 
the California Public Utilities 
Commission reopened hearings on 
PG&E's application to build the 
atomic plant, announcing that it 
had received a nimiber of letters 
opposing the project. 

The questions, and the answers 
which PG&E made public today, 
cover such subjects as reactor 



safet.v. plant economics, plans for 
public use of areas of Bodega Head 
not requii'ed for plant operation, 
marine biology and the laws and 
regulations under which PG&E 
must build and operate the atomic 
unit. 

The Company began preliminary 
site preparation and access road 
woik at Bodega Head on January 
7 after the CPUC denied two pe- 
titions for rehearing on the license 
which it issued to PG&E last No- 
vember. In December PG&E ap- 
plied to the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission for a permit to construct 
the nuclear portion of the plant. 
The AEC has announced that it 
will hold public hearings on the 
application in California in the 
near future. 



JACK TAR HOTEL 

Van Ness and Geary 

PRospect 6-8200 

San Francisco, California 

SAN FRANCISCO NATIONAl BANK 

A Disungmshcd 'Hayrn: in Ban}{ing 

MKMIIKR OF FEDERAL INSURANCE CORI'dRA Til IN 
FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



260 C.ilifornia Street 



YUkon 1-4100 



HEARST COKPOKATIOIS 
Hearst Building 

San Francisco 



• NOW RENTING! 

• ST. FRANCIS SQUARE 
• SHOPPING CENTER 

lu DALY CITY 

Opportunities for Additional Sliops: 

Hardware - Toys - Professional - Florist 
Shoes - Sporting Goods ■ l»len's Weai 
Real Estate - Bakery . Jewelry, nnany other! 

Call Mr. Grandin (EX. 7-150}} 



Phone JU. 4-3030 

GIORGI 
TRUCKING COMPANY 

1742 Fitzgerald Ave. 

SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIF. 



JAMES L. VIZZARD 

ALEX SOURIKOFF, Associate 

Insurance Brohers 

2840 JUDAH STREET 

San Francisco 22, California 

Established 1890 



Ray's Corner Liquors 

BEER ■ WINES ■ LIQUORS 

506 VALENCIA ST. 
UN. ?-6?54 



B&M GARAGE 

AUTOMOTIVE SER\'ICE 

PA RKING 

46') EDDY ST. 

TIJ. ■5-6056 



SUNSHINE REST HOME 

Twenty-four Hour Core for 

AMBULATORY GUESTS 

MEN ond WOMEN 

Elevofor Service 

ANNE MURRAY 

719 -36th Ave., Son Francisco 
SKyline 1-7705 



REITER'S FURNITURE 



N.. 



W inl; SIXLCTIiiNS 
..n.illv Advi-rlisfd Anpli.' 
AM Typt. — Ea.y Tern,, 



in and look around— N. 

prc.iMirc-Frcc Parkinu in i. . 

4760 MISSION STREET 

S^n Franci.cn DEIaware 4.480 



MABEL MINION GUEST HOUSE 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9255 



FRANKLIN MARKET 

Groceries - Produce - Wine - Beer 
BARBECUED CHICKEN TO (K 
2836 Franklin St. GR. 4-806< 



A &6 GARMENT 
DELIVERY 

Tom Maxncll 
MI. 8-7111 
2277 Shatter Ave. 



r. I. r,\ 1- 14:111 _ ,s iioin- ScMvii-e 

CIVIC CENTER CLEANERS 
AND LAUNDRY 

Knit I'.ln.'kinK 1 nn- Sp.-ci^ill v 
Ladies' and Gents' Alterations 
.II'.Xl-; THc i.Ml'Sli.V, (iwTiLT 
61 McAllister St.. San Francisco 

Joseph's Barber Shop 

HAIR STYLING 

.niSKPH FLORKS. Prol). 

For Appointments, SE 1-9976 

573 Buckingham 'Way. Stonestow 

J&JPLATINGWORKS 

FRANK ami JOE JUKICH 
1420 HARRISON ST. " 

MArket 1-3249 ■ 

MIKE TSIRLIS 
CAR RADIO SPECIALISTS 

FM - AM Motorola Auto Radios 

.■<al,s - .S.ni,,. - K.lail. \Vh..l.sali 

790 GOLDEN GATE AVENUI 

PRospect 6-9070 

PETER PELLETIER ami 
MANUEL MENENDEZ 

SUPERIOR PLUMBING and 
HARDWARE 

5 526 SACRAMENTO STREET 
WEst 1-1266 



CONSTRUCTION 
AGGREGATES 
CORPORATION 

Telephone DOuglas 3-1718 
503 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 5, Calif. 


S(AVENGEKS- 

PROTECTIVE 

ASSOCIATION. INC. 

2550 MASON STREET 
EX 2-3859 


Sports 

Newly revised copies of the 
boating pamphlet, "A-B-C's of Cal- 
ifornia BoatiiiR Law", have just 
been received from the printer and 
are now available for distribution 
in the otfite of Senator "J" Eugene 
McAteer. 

This is the first publication 
which includes the new watei-way 
marker system adopted last May 
28, by the Small Crafts Harbor 


KLEINS 
LEGAL SERVK E 

LEGAL DIAGRAMS 
W8 Larkin St. PR 5-1045 

BILL LUECK 


B & B AUTO REPAIR 
CO. 

ROY BARRET 

Open Ss^.m. to 12 p.m. Daily 

Half Day Saturday 

639 Hyde Street GR 4-0878 

Between Post and Geary 


"The new system is presented in 
chart form on the back cover tnd 
is considered of great interest an.l 
importance to all California boat- 
ers," said Senator McAteer 

Copies are free and may >e ob- 
tained at Senator McAleei office. 
Room 2045 of the State uilding. 
350 McAllister Street, oi .y phon- 
ing the office at UNdei 11 1-8700, 
extension 2593. 




Mission 8-91198 

THE 
CHEROKEE 

Sam ■ Tony ■ Terry 

453 CORTLAND AVE. 
San Francisco 


Geor^if S('hare(j5 & Sons 
ORAYMEN 

>04.22nd St. MI 7-4932 
SAN FRANCISCO 7 


SUN HUNG HEUNG 
RESTAURANT 

GENUINE 
CHINESE FOOD 

Cocktails 
744 Washington St. 

YU 2-2319 




GEARY MOTORS 

New 1963 Fords 

Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 


MEDICAL PHARMACY 

Prescription Specialists 
Quality Cosmetics 

595 Buckingham Way 


JAN'S 

HANCOCK SERVICE 

We Service 

ALL MAKES AND MODELS 

801 McAllister St. WA 1-6268 


LO 6-7734 
STONESTOWN 


AUDITORIUM 

SANDWICH SHOP 

NEAR EVERYTHING 

DROP IN FOR A SNACK 

1286 Market St. M.A. 1-1930 


•hone JUnijpcr 4-3030 


H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 
Instruments for Hand Surgery 
Active Hand QC Finger Splints 

70 nth STREET 
MA 1-6876 


GIORGI 
TRUCKING COMPANY 

1742 Fitzgerald Avenue 


MIKE IN' >UYE'S 

RICHFIEI: SERVICE 

Tune Up & .'.epairs — Tires 

Batteries - Accessories 

PICKUI' SC DELIVERY 

1999 Pine .'. San Francisco, Cal. 

V AInut 1-2825 


San Francisco 2, Calif. 


INDO CHINA 

RESTAURANT 

JOE JUNG 
263 O'Farrell St. DO. 2-9957 


KLINGER & 
Shaffer Co. 

lonfectlonery Equipment 

342 FIFTH STREET 

YUkon 2-5697 
San Francisco 7, Calif. 


BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

specialists on Wheet Atignment 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-7020 

Bill Barca San Francisco 


J. BIZON 

Used Furniture and all kinds of 
Merchandise — We huy and sell 

856 McAllister street 

Phone Day or Night 
Bus. FI. 6-6605 Res. MO. 4-1809 


Greek American Club 

161 Eddy Street 



BUNGALOW FLORIST 

KAY es? DEE 

Speciar/tng in Funeral DesJKn 

WEI /I>hNGS — CORSAGES 
CI' I I LOWERS — PLANTS 

!188 HILLSIDE AVE. 

PI,. 5-3718 COLMA 



ZWEEGMAN MEDICAL 

SECRETARIAL TRAINING 

Since I9it — Approved by S.in 
Francisco County Medical Society 

12 MONTH COURSE 

ACBS Accredited — A Challenging 

Opportunity for Alert 

Young Women 

FOR INFORMATION CALL 

ZWEEGMAN SCHOOL 

FOR 

MEDICAL SECRETARIES 

1441 Van Ness Ave. TU. 5-5731 



TRAIN FOR 
A CAREER 

-MEN and WOMEN- 

h{,S. Grads or Presently Employed 
Day or Evening Classes 

Intensified Six-Month Course 

No Previous Experience Necessary 

MECHANICAL DRAFTING 

ELECTRICAL DRAFTING 

and DESIGN 

Registration Hours: 
l^nily 2 to 8 — Sat. 9 to 1 

FREE PLACEMENT 

Industrial Training Center 

5745 Geary Blvd. SK. 2-1382 



THE READING 
GUIDANCE CENTER 

ANNOUNCES 

F..11 Session, 1962 

After School Prograin 

IN 

Basic and Remedial Reading 
Instruction for Students from 
Second Grade Through College 
AN INDIVIDUAL PROGkAM ..uihncd 
ior cacli student tu .i*,«i*t m his p.irticuiar 
weaknesses; ptionu's, word recognition, vo- 
cabulary, comprehension, or study tech' 

si^ALL CLASSES— Each hmJted to five, 
homogeneously i;rouped by age and read' 

in^- ahihty. 

THE READING 
GUIDANCE CENTER, INC. 

For further information cont.ict: 
Lakeside - Stonestown Office 

2411 Ocean Avenue 

JUnipcr 6-5050 



:T0BER - NOVEMBER, 1962 



Public Library, 
Periodicals Room, 
Civic Center, City 2,- 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San FranciKO, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 

1600 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 9, California 

PRospect 6-0880 



VOLKSWAGEN 

— Distributors — 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - NORTRERN NEVADA - UTAH 




C^i> VREXCE IV. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



Fruilvale Chapel 

1580 FHUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIlog 3-4114 



Elmhursl Chapel 

8901 E. 14th STREET 

NEptuno 2-4343 



^<x% a ttecu cUtUa^ cxfrenceticc. 




Located at 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



William O. (Bill) 

DUFFY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
TAX CONSULTANT 



2888 MISSION ST. 



AT. 24151 



PERIODICAL DEPT. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




MELVYN I. CRONIN. 
JUDGE. SUPERIOR COURT 

AROUND & ABOUT 

B, WHIT HENRY 

BAY WINDOW 

JOHN F. SHELLEY. 
CONGRESSMAN 




JUDGE MELVYN I. CRONIN OF THE SUPERIOR COURT 



(JTY NAMES DAM 
FOR J. H. TURNER 




JAMES H. TURNER 
General Manager, Water Department 

A new dam in the San Francisco 
water supply system has been 
named for James H. Turner, water 
department manager with 41 years 
of city service, who will retire in 
September. 

The dain is located on San An- 
tonio Creek in southern Alameda 
County where the city owns water 
rights obtained from the Spring 
Valley Water Company which it 
took over in the early 30's. 

Turner was manager of the 
Hetch Hetchy water and power 
projects and manager of all the 
city's utilities, including municipal 
railway and airport during his life- 
time of city sei'vice. 



JOHN'S CLEANING i TAILORING 



NERO'S BEAUTY SHOP 



ELU BASQUE RESTAURANT 



>^. mniLiii^^ 




65 miles north of Oakland 

Invites you to beautiful Napa Valley to 
relax from life's tensions at the oldest 
Battle Creek type institution in the 
west: baths, massage, diet, rest. 

Completely modern Diagnostic 

and Physical Therapy facilities 

For Rates and Reservations 

woodward 3-3611 

ST. HELENA 
CALIFORNIA 

Over 80 years of health'building! 



CHARLES E. SMITH 

Realty 



• Sales 

• Refinancing 

• Real Estate Loans 

• Appraisals 

• Notary Public 




- MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE - 



101 -A Broad Street 



JUniper 4-4626 



E. MARTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Est.ihlishcd 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 
EXbrook 7-2760 



THE RECOI 



PERIODICAL DEPT. 

JUN I? 19Bd 

GAN FRANCISCO 
PU3LIC LISRARIY 



bay 





HER HONOR, THE MAYOR! History of a rare and heart-warming 
id was made in San Francisco's burgeoning neighbor city up the 
y several weeks ago when a brown-haired, hazel-eyed lady named 
jrence E. Douglas rapped her first gavel as Mayor of Vallejo. 
The first feminine mayor in the history of the storied city, she 
1 swept out of office an eight year incumbent with a smashing 
jority vote that left political 
ignosticators flabbergasted, 
^nd the resultant situation was 
; only heart-warming to the dis- 
minating voters of Vallejo. but 
to countless San Francisco 
snds of the new mayor who have 
own her fondly, worked with her 
Jiusiastically. and gained from 
! rewarding warmth of her 
endship over many years. 
Up to six years ago, when she 
ived to Vallejo permanently. 
)rence Douglas had been an in- 
:erate San Franciscan who had 
ide innumerable contributions to 
s city's civic life since the mid- 
rties. She and her buff, hearty, 
ritone-voiced husband, the late 
irold Douglas, were seen con- 
intly around the improvement, 
jrtsmcn and merchants clubs, 
ling active parts in the affairs 
the city-wide Central Council of 
Ac Clubs, the Ingleside Boosters. 
; Ingleside Sportsmen and many 
lers. 

Because of her vast and ever- 
;reasing circle of friends and her 
canny ability of being able, in 
quiet and unassuming manner, 
resolve neighborhood problems, 
Drence was frequently asked to 
ly political support roles. Her 
llingness to help when she was 
nvinced of the woith of a can- 




MRS. R.ALPH DUHAGON 
(See Page 14) 



didate or a measure and her sage 
know-how contributed substantial- 
ly to the vote-getting success of 
many a worth-while candidate and 
project. 

She had one very particular 
favorite whom she supported per- 
ennially — the late Supervisor 
Adolph Uhl, "watchdog of the 
City's treasury," who was reelected 
over and over again. He and Mrs. 
Uhl were good personal friends of 
Florence and Doug, and frequent 
visitors at the Douglas home high 
on Plymouth Avenue. 

That was a rare home indeed, 
always aglow with numerous 
friends "just dropping in" and with 
the endless younger friends of the 
lively and charming Douglas 
daughters. Hallmarks of the Doug- 
las home were laughter and con- 
viviality and song and high spirits. 
No one who ever visited for the 
first time left a stranger. 

For a number of years, on and 
off. Florence was office manager 
for the City-County Record. As a 
matter of fact she left an in- 



fluencing impression on many of 
our issues, and we well remember 
her deep interest and at times 
almost altruistic support during 
some of the pre-war lean years. 
One political adventure that we 
remember well was in 1947 when 
she joined forces with a young 
ex-Chronicle reporter. Bill Simons, 
to manage the campaign of the 
incumbent District Attorney. The 
campaign resulted in the over- 
( Continued on Page 14) 



:iTY-COUNTY RECORD 

^be Magazine of Good Gorerntnenl 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor .ind Puhlislicr 

Published at 389 Church Strcst 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

APRIL - MAY. 1963 
olume 30 Number 3 



McGUIRE and HESTER 

General Contractors 
796- 66th AVENUE 



Telephone NEptiine 2-7676 
Oakland 21, California 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




^ven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guidcs tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 
low. 

U-Drives, 
LimousineSf 
Charier Buses 

availabU 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



'RII. -MAY. 1963 



MELVYN I. CRONIN 

Superior Court Judge 
City and County of San Francisco 



By DEAN ST. DENNIS 




MELVYN I. CRONIN 
Judge, Superior Court 



The residents of San Francisco appear to be coming more aware of 
the city's problem children, says Superior Judge Melvyn I. Cronin of 
the Juvenile Court. 

And that is as it should be, says the Judge, for the number of children 
brought to the court's attention is growing larger. 

In 1961, there were 11.185 referrals to the court — including 4421 
for delinquent offenses, 2007 neglected children, and 4298 for traffic 
offenses. This represented a decrease of 1.3 per cent from the previous 
year. 

The final report for 1962 has not yet been compiled, but Judge Cronin 
says that the total number of chil- 
dren processed through the court 
and the Youth Guidance Center has 
increased about 12 per cent in the 
past 18 months. 

"It's imperative that the com- 
munity be concerned," the judge 
said in an interview. 

"The people touched and in- 
volved by these problems should be 
concerned. So should the general 
public, because they are paying for 
the support and maintenance of 
these children the year around." 

The delinquent child, of course, 
is one who gets into trouble 
through his own actions. Their 
plight is sad. Even sadder are the 
dependent and neglected children — 
who are brought to the authorities 
through no fault of their own. 

Juge Cronin has been the Super- 
ior judge assigned to the Juvenile 

Court for 10 years, and he has this There must be a greater attempt 
observation about one cause of the to instill in parents — as well as 

growing problem with children 

here: 

"San Francisco is a changing 
city. We are now having a more 
disproportionate number of fam- 
ilies in low socio-economic levels 
than ever before. 

"Too many of our middle class 
families are leaving to live in the 
suburbs. Our city is becoming a 
big merchandising and mercantile 
center. 

"Whats' missing is that middle 
class group. Most of our problems 
still come from the other side of 
the tracks . . . from families in 
poor economic conditions." 

What does the future hold? 

"Unfortunately, I see a spreading 
of deterioration and disorganiza- 
tion and discord in too many fam- 
ilies. Seventy to 75 per cent of the 
cases which come to us are created 
by some sort of discord in the fam- 
ily." 

Will the number of delinquent 
and neglected children increase? 

"I don't see anything to indicate 
it would be changed, unless there 
is a better understanding of these 
problems," the judge said. 



their children — a sense of responsi- 
bility, he said. And this should be 
coupled, he added, with a general 
raising of the economic and cul- 
tural standards in the city's de- 
pressed areas. 

"Everyone must be interested in 
wanting to provide for a better 
community life — for better living 
conditions, better recreation facil- 
ities, school conditions." 

Re.search studies have shown it 
is possible to spot the beginning of 
delinquent behavior in children 
between five and nine years of age, 
and a program along these lines 
should be fully developed in San 
Fi'ancisco's public schools, he said. 

In speech after speech to civic 
groups in the past few years, Judge 
Cronin has developed this theme: 

"Delinquents are not born — they 
are made. They are products of 
their own environment ,of home, 
neighborhood, culture, and custom. 
Delinquency is a disease. Not every 
case can be treated the same. 

"Most cases have come before 
the court from disorganized, de- 
teriorated, or depraved homes — 
where there is a lack of love and 
affection, little if any training and 
discipline, and too much parental 
selfishness, laziness, dissention, 
marital discord, moral laxity and 
drinking. 



"Too many children in troub 
who have come before the cou 
seem to have little if any ideas i 
moral and spiritual values, person 
responsibility for their actions, < 
respect for authority. These thinj 
must be taught." 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6561 

BURLINGAME, California 



SHREVE 
&C0. 

Jewelers 

* 

Post and Grant Avenue 

GA. 1-2600 

San Francisco 



SUMMER TERM 

June 17th 

Boys • Girls • Adults 

7tli through 12th Grades 

ALL COURSES ACCREDITED 

"Prep" for Entrance Exams fo 
West Point, Annapolis, Air Forc< 
Coast Guard, Maritime Academic; 
Naval Reserve and College Boart 

ENGLISH FOR FOREIGNERS 

I.iibor.Ttory Chemistry for Nurses 

SECRETARIAL COURSES 

Regular High School Courses 

Accelerated (two years in one) 

Private Tutoring - Day and Nigh 

DREW 

SCHOOL 

2901 California St., S.F. FI 6-483 



THE RECOI 



Around and About 



By WHIT HENKY 

San Francisco has always produced colorful figures in all fields of 
indeavor; a notable one was the late Dr. Charles Strub, onetime part 
iwncr of the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast Baseball League 
ind then "bossman" of the fantastically successful Santa Anita Race 
'rack. With the permission of Fred Purner, former newspaper man of 
Ian Francisco and now Director of obiead of California, monthly mag- 
'ublicity and Advertising for azine of the California Thorobread 
anta Anita, I quote from the an- Breeders' Association, in part: 
ual Santa Anita Press File. " 'Dr. Strub might well be in- 

"Dr. Charles Henry Strub, a Cal- eluded in the upper echelon of 
'ornia native-son who was born in sports personalities with such 
[cluster on Nov. 3, 1884, had al- names as Col. Matt Winn, Tex 
eady made a success of his life Rickard, Connie Mack, Knute 
s a professional man in dentistry Rockne and others. He could be 
nd in the field of sports as presi- just as fittingly mentioned with 
ent of baseball's most successful Florenz Ziegfeld, Phineus T. Bar- 
ilnor league franchise, the San num, John Ringiing North and 
'ranci.sco Seals, when he entered David Wark Griffith. 
le sport of Thoroughbred racing " 'Dr. Strub's name would not be 
ith his associates as Vice-Presi- at all out of place if mentioned 
ent and General Manager of Santa with those above, but it will not be. 
jiita. It would not be because, simply 

"Racing was not strange to him. and truly, he was unique. 
.s a young man attending U.C. at " 'Conceivably a monument, a 
lerkeley he had once lived near the memorial, might one day be erected 
Id Emeryville track, and later in to honor him, but nothing could be 
fe had acquired close associations less necessary. He created his own 
ith business and financial leaders monument . . . His monument is 
'ho were active in racing in the Santa Anita and from the day it 
Eist and abroad, and he had often was conceived he always intended 
isited and studied major race it to be. 
[ticks in other localities. " 'Charles Strub, more than any 

"Dr. Strub insisted that Santa man of his time, changed the face 
.nita be operated on the highest of American racing. A tremendous 
lane of integrity to gain merited competitor, a daring pioneer, an 
ublic confidence and he was quick innovator of imagination and gen- 
) adopt the latest improvements ius, still his outstanding character- 
nd devices to help establish Santa istic was integrity. Integi'ity to an 
nita's vast public acceptance. The ideal, faithfulness to a dream, 
hoto-finish camera, the mechan- awareness of the responsibilities 
:al starting gate, visual electric and obligations of his track's posi- 
ming, and the photo patrol were tion in the warp of American life'." 
II installed at Santa Anita I thank you, Fred Pruner, for the 
above information and tribute to 
Dr. Charles Henry Strub. 



OFFICE SPACE FOR KENT 


For Bail Bonds ■ Attorney 


• Insurance Broker, etc. 


600 Square Feet, "STREET FLOOR" with Parking Area 


LOCATION: Near Main Entrance-off the "NEW HALL OF JUSTICE" 


Telephone for 


appointment 


BAyview 


1-5237 



romptly. 

"He was conscious of a deep re 
Donsibility to the public by con 
nually modernizing, e.xpandin 



I am also deeply grateful to mv 



nd improving the race trek's fa- good friend Winsor Josselyn who 
ilities for greater convenience to did this column for me while I was 
ay for auto parking in a modem, undergoing a siege that put me in 
ived and controlled parking area. St. Luke's Hospital. Thank you, 
hose who scoffed at Santa Anita's Winsor. 

o-pass policy soon changed their At St. Luke's I was on the 4th 
me. A high purse structure quick- floor; all the staff members were 
' attracted the nation's leading as kind and considerate as it is 
icing stables. humanly possible to be. so here is 

" 'Bet what you can afford to lose a "Thank You" to the angels of the 
-not what you hope to win' be- 4th floor. I love you all. 
ime the Santa Anita maxim which 
itablished the race track's re- 
jected position in community life 
hich it has steadfastly maintained 
Id zealously guarded. 

"The policies of Dr. Strub at 
anta Anita soon were adopted by 
:her race tracks and national 
jnors to him included 'Man of the 
ear' awards from the New York 
urf Writers, 1946, and the Horse- 
len's Benevolent and Protective 
ssociation, 19.56. 

"Following his death on March 
i, 19.58, there were many tributes 
Jid to his memory. Said the Thor- 



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Auto Painting 
260 CLEMENTINA STREET 
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Main Office 
2200 WOOD STREET 

OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 
Phone TWinoaks 3-8714 

194 South "G" Street, Areata, Calif. 
1805 Chapin Road, Montebello, CaHf. 

CHIN & HENSOLT, INC. 

Consuhing Engineers 

P. Q. CHIN, Structur.il Engineer 

W. H. HENSOLT, Structural Engineer 

121 SECOND STREET 

GArficId 1-0847 San Francisco 5, California 

ACME PAPER COMPANY 

y^O Tennessee St., San Francisco 7, Calif. AT water 2-9786 

Prepackaging Engineers - Government Contractors 

Distributors DuPont Cellephane - Scott Industrial Products 

Continental Can Cups and Containers 

East Bay and Peninsula: ENterprise 1-0712 



PRIL-MAY, 1963 



Walter J. Brown Named Dept. 
Maiiaijer for California State 
Chamber of Commerce 

Walter J. Brown, former San 
Francisco public relations consult- 
ant, has been named manager of a 
newly designated Public Relations 
Chamber of Commerce. 

The department is an outgrowth 
of the former publicity and mag- 
azine services directed by Will Wil- 
liams, who has resigned to take a 
position in Los Angeles, said Gal- 
loway. 

Brown, a resident of Ross, Marin 
County, was publicity manager of 
the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce from 1949 to 1957. For 
the past six years he has headed 
his own finn, Walter J, Brown Pub- 
lic Relations. His early background 
was in newspaper and advertising 
fields. 

Gallowa.v. describing the new de- 
partment designation, said: 

"Its sei-vices will exceed 'pub- 
licity'. While most Chamber activ- 
ities involve public relations, hav- 
ing one department charged with 
that function exclusively will bring 
the State Chamber into line with 
private industry practices and en- 
able us to perform more effectively 
in this important field. 

"Mr. Brown brings to our organ- 
ization not only chamber of com- 
meice understanding but also the 
benefit of objective viewpoints 
gained in broad public relations 
work over the past six years with 
many of the state's top business, 




W.ALTER J. BROWN 

Public Relations Expert 

professional, association, industrial 
and governmental groups." 

Brown's duties will include di- 
recting the Chamber's statewide 
news services to all media, editing 
its quarterly "California, Magazine 
of Commerce, Agriculture and In- 
dustry." and handling other public 
relations functions. 

The new department manager is 
a member of the Press & Union 
League Club and the Public Rela- 
tions Round Table of San Fran- 
cisco and is past president of the 
Bay Area Publicity Club. He is a 
former director of the Boy Scout 
Troop Service Association and the 
San Francisco unit, American As- 
sociation for the U.N. 



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"Jack" KRUG 

Friendly Experienced Personal Help in Solving Your "Group Travel" 

Problems Thai Go Far Beyond "The Normal Call of Duly" 

WESTERN GREYHOUND LINES 

1944 Broadway Oakland, California 

TEmplebar 2-4863-4-3212 



EAGLESON 
ENGINEERS 



615 Sansome Street 
San Francisco 11, California 



PITTSBURGH 

TESTING 
LABORATORY 

Established 1881 

INSPECTING ENGINEERS 
and CHEMISTS 



651 HOWARD STREET 

San Francisco 5, CaHfornia 

St, in .Seaman 

California Trophy and Engraving Co. 

PRospcct 6-6932 

Jewelry — Diamonds — Watches 

299 Ellis Street San Francisco 2, California 



THE RECORI 



THE 

JOHN R SHELLEY STORY 



tie inside story of Congressman 
1 F. Shelley's race for Mayor 
Ian Francisco in the November 
tion is that there is no inside 

y- 

lelley is an anomaly on the 
tical scene: a man who does 
hide behind evasive answers or 
licitous statements. He has 
!r ducked an issue and has not 
been forced to eat any of his 
words. Piobably this is be- 
ie of his habit of calling his 
s as he sees them -and when 
;an't sec them he doesn't hesi- 
to admit it. Speaking frankly 
to the point is a firm habit of 
ley's. 

've wanted to be mayor ever 
e I was a kid growing up in 
Mission district," says Shelley, 
3ly. "I think a lot of men have 
ambition and I consider my- 
fortunate that I've acquired 
experience I believe to be nec- 
ry for the job. 

; don't want to be Mayor so I 
use the City Hall to run for 
ernor or some other job. I just 
t to be mayor of the city I 
born in. 

: often recall a motto that 
'or Lapham had on his desk: 
Sure You're Right, Then Go 
ad.' I think I'm right now so 
going ahead. If I'm wrong, 
1 find out about it." 
helley's career began in labor, 
svery San Franciscan probably 
ws. Hewas born South of Mar- 
street September 3, 1905. His 
ler was a longshoreman. 
helley graduated in 1923 from 
sion High School, where he was 
lent body president, ROTC 
imander and an outstanding 
lete. After going to sea and 
jming a licensed officer on his 
: birthday, he entered law 
X)l at the University of San 
ncisco and received his LL.B. 
932. He drove a bakery wagon 
he daytime while studying law 
night. 

helley was elected president of 
San Francisco Labor Council 
.937 at the age of 31. youngest 
1 in council history to hold that 
:e. He instituted the pattern 
responsible negotiating — on 
li sides of the table — that has 
:e characterized San Francisco 
)r relations. 

■rom 1948 to his election to 
igress he was secretary-treas- 
r of the Council and from 1947 
1950 was also president of the 




('oniplimciils 


of a 


FRIEND 



JOHN F. SHELLEY 

California State Federation of 
Labor lAFLl. 

In 1938 he declared for the State 
Senate and with his customary 
frankness, said: 

"I'm pro-labor and let there be 
no misunderstanding of that. But 
crowded into the last si.x years has 
been a lot of experience in prob- 
lems affecting employees, employ- 
ers and consumers. On the basis 
of my experience and knowledge, 
I can and will represent all of San 
Francisco if elected." 

Labor support put Shelley in, but 
it is significant that his political 
strength thereafter came from 
Montgomery street as well as fi-om 
the halls of labor. Shelley had 
stated himself, and kept his word. 
He is still the staunch champion 
of labor and all that labor stands 
for, but in the State Senate and 
later in Congress, he was equally 
zealous in behalf of the commun- 
ity's business welfare. 

In accepting the co-chairmanship 
(with Democrat James F. Thach- 
er) of The Citizens Committee for 
Shelley for Mayor, John W. Mail- 
liard III, a Republican who is a 
former pre.sident of the Chamber 
of Commerce, had this to say: 

"I enthusiastically endorse Jack 
Shelley for mayor and intend to 
work in his behalf because I sin- 
cerely believe he is the best quali- 
fied man for this responsibility. 

"His 13 years in Congress repre- 
senting this city have given him a 
real knowledge of the city's needs. 
They also have given him a keen 
insight into how things get done 
(Continued on Page 13 1 



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Ask for NICK 



5100 - 24th Si. 



WEINSTEIN CO. 

1041 MARKET STREET 
YOUR FRIENDLY DEPARTMENT STORS 



100 Market Street 
615 Market Street 



820 Clement Street 
130 West Portal 



1620 Polk Street 



Ktliiii 


CLiude Bcrhouct and Cl.iudine Berhouct, Props. 

Hotel de France 

BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 

780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF. 

Sweetheart Hnms and Bacon 
"Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



RIL-MAY, 1963 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



1 Cllv Hall 
■hrlsloph. 



M.\ 1-0163 



John r>. Sullivan. Kxecutlve Secretary 
Robprt M. SnialUy. Conlidcntlal Secretary 
Margaret Smith. Personal Secretary 
John I^ Mootz, Administrative As.slstant 
Itolurt Rockwell. Public Service Director 
Irnln .1. Mus.wn. I'rban Tlenewal Coordinator 
Cyril .1. Uoche. Principal Administrative Analyst 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

235 Citv Hall HB 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 

Peter Tamaras. President. 1020 Harrison 

William r. Blal<e. 90 Folsom St. 

Uoeer noas. 2S23 Oeary St. 

.To.seph M. Casey. 252S Ocean Ave. 

Harold S. Dobbs. 351 California St. 

Pr Charles A. B>tola. 2:>3 CnUmihus Ave. 

.Tohn J Kerdon. ISS MontEomery St. 

.Tames I... Hallev. S70 Market St. 

Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 

.Taek Morrison. 2590 Greenwich St. 

Joseph E. TInney. 2517 Mission St. 

Robert J. r>olan. Clerk 

Lillian M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development— Boas. Blake. 

Counfy.'^State and National Affairs— Ferdon, Dobbs, 
McMahon 

Education. Parks and Recreation— Ertola. Blake. 
Casey ^ .., t^ j 

Finance. Revenue and Taxation— Dobbs, Ferdon, 
Halley 

Judiciary. Lesislative and Civil Service — Tinney. 
McMahon. Moirison 

Police — Casey. Ertola. Tinney . „, , 

Public Buildings. Lands and City Planning- Mor- 
rison. Boas. Tinney 

Fublic Health and Welfare — McMahon. Halley. Mor- 
rison 

Public Utilities— Halley. Dobbs. Ferdon 

Streets and Highway.s — Blake, Boas. Ertola 

Hubs — Tamaras. Dobbs. Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

101 Citv Hall KL 2-1910 

Russell I,. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 



2or. 



Hal 



HK 1-1322 



M. O'Connor 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

s.yn IJrvant St. 
Thomas C. I..ynch 
PUBLIC DEFENDIER 

s.-,» Bryant St. 
l-:dward T. Mancuso 
SHERIFF 

.■!?.l Cllv Hall 
Mnlthew C. Carberry 
TREASURER 

llu City Hail 
John J. Goodwin 



COURTS 



c. Harold Oullield, 
Haymond J. Arata 
I -arl H. Allen 
llyron Arnold 
John W. Uuasey 
Walter Carpeneti 
Mfilvyn I. Cronln 
Norman Klkington 
Timothy 1. p'itzpatri 
Joseph Karcsh 
Gerald S. L,evin 
Francis McCarty 
Joseph M. Cumr 
480 City Hall 



John U. Molinari 
Edward Molkenbuhr 
Clarence W. Morris 
Harry J. Neubarth 
Raymond J. O'Connor 
Edward F. O'Day 
Charles S. Peery 

;k George W. Schonfeld 

William F. Traver.io 
Alvln B. Weinberger 
H. A. van der Zee 

lins. Secretary 

UN 1-855 



KI, 2-3008 



Andrew J. Kyman, PresidinB 
Fltz-Gerald Ames, Sr. Inland J. l.,azarus 

Albert A. Axelrod Clarence A. T>inn 

Emmet Daly George E. Maloney 

Robert J. Drewes Lawrence S. Mana 

Bernard B. Ollckfeld William A. O'Brien 

Clayton W. Horn I.,enore D. Underwood 

Elton C. Lawless James J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon. Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-3008 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

MARCH 1, 1963 

TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

S.^iO Bryant St. Kl' 2-: 

James Leddy. Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-: 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
J. Donohue. Foreman 



ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

880 Bryant St. KL 3-9111 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman, 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew P. Connolly. 399 Fremont St. 
Adolph L. Pierotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 

JUVENILE COURT 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodslde Ave. .SE 1-5740 

Hon. Melvyn I. Cronin. Presiding Judge 
Thomas F. Strycula. Chief Juvenile Probation Oflicer 

JUVENILE JUSTICE COMMISSION 

Meets 2nd Thursday of month; 1:00 P.M. 

375 Woodside Avenue 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 79 New Montgomery St. 
Reverend Hamilton T. Boswell, 1975 Post St. 
Reverend John A. Collins. 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Reverend James B. Flynn, 1825 Mission St. 
Miss Myra R. Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Mrs. Horace A. Guittard, 3871 Jackson St. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
William M. Reedy, 55 Fillmore St. 
Mrs. Mathew O. Tobriner. 3494 Jackstm St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren MIddlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE. FEDERAL 
Maurice Shean 

1545 - 18th Street. N.W.. Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Ponald W. Cleary 

El Mirador Hotel, Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 I.arkin 

Meets 1st Monday of i 

Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 1 Bush St. 
Bernard C. Begley M.D., 450 Sutter St. 
Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 
Joseph Eaherlck, 2065 Powell St. 
Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 
John K. Hagopian. 220 Bush St. 
Betty Jackson. 2835 Vallejo St. 
William E. Knuth. 1600 Holloway Ave. 
Burton L. Rockwell. 50 Green St. 
Nell SInton, 1020 Francisco St. 

Ex-Offlcio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace I^eglon of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President. Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Executive Secretary 



CITV PLANNING COMMISSION 

1011 l.iirkin St. Ill-; 1-2 

Meets every Thursday at 2:30 P.Al. 

Louis Mark Cole, President, 1958 Vallejo St. 
Alvin H. Baum. Jr.. 2009 Green St. 
James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Mein, 315 Montgomery St. 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer j 

Manager of Utilities I 

James R. McCarthy, Director of Planning ' 

Thomas G. Miller, Secretary 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall Ml': 

Meets every Thursday at 4 I'.M. 

Hubert J. Sober, President, 155 Montgoiiier.v .•<! 
Richard C. Ham, 200 Bush St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick, 827 Hyde St. 

George J. Grubb, General Manager, Peisuiii 



EDUCATION. BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue I'N 3-4 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7::!0 P.M. 

170 Fell St. I 



Edward Kemmitt, President. 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper. Jr., 10 Walnut St. 
Samuel A. Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 
Mrs. Edward Matzger, 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 351 California St. 
James E. Stratten, 800 Presidio Ave. 
Adolfo de Urioste, 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears. Supt. of Schools and Se 



FIRE COMMISSION 
2 City Hall 
Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 



Philip Dindia, President, 536 Bryant St. 

Dr. Peter Angel. 1867 - 15th Ave. 

Charles R. Greenstone, 182 Second SI. 

William F. Murray. Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas "W. McCarthy, Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1-: 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Frank J. Collins, Pi-esident, 2614 - 16th Ave. 
George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 

Donald M. Campbell. M.D., 977 Valencia St. : 

Donald J. McCook. 220 Montgomery St. I 

Thomas TV. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. I 

Lyie J. O'Connell, Executive Director ' 



Ex. Officio Members 
Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Joseph P. Mazzola. Chairman. 1021 Market St. 
John E. Gurich, 300 Montgomery St. 
Solomon E. Johnson. 704 Market St. 
T. Knng Lee. 715 Sacramento St. 
Melvln M. Swig. Fairmont Hotel 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. HE 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 



David TTiomson. Chairman. 65 Berry St. 

Arthur S. Becker. 3475 California St. 

liunakl Magnln. 77 O'Farrell St. 

G. Baltzer Peterson. 2910 Vallejo St. 

John E. Sullivan. 69 West Portal Ave. 
Vining T. Fisher, Director 
Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 



THE RECO 



•ERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

2L>7 City Hull Ml'; 1-21L'I 

Mi'i-l» every Wednesiliiy at 3:U0 P.M. 

William n. H. Havls. President, 'JS4 Kulsom SI. 
JeorKo H. Glllln, 4091 - 19th Ave. 
[. Max Moore. 598 I'otrero Ave. 
:iaronco J. Wulsh, 124 Delano Ave. 
Srnest I.,. West. 165 Marina Blvd. 

J. Edwin Mattox, Exeeutlve Scerelurv 



>OLICE COMMISSION 

S.-.ii nrviint .SIn-.t Kl, ::- 

M.els every .\lond;iy at r.lllli I'.M. 

iarold H. Mi-Klnnon. President. 255 Callforniii Hi 

*aul A. HIsslnBer, 415 Sansonie St. 

>on Kazackerley. 851 Howard St. 
Thomas J. fahlll. Chief of Pollee 
Alfred J. Nelder. Deputy Chief of Police 
Capt. Cornelius P. Murphy, Chief of In.speeto 
I. Thomas Zaraproza, Director of Traffle 
Capt. John T. Butler. Department Secretary 
I.t. William .1. O'Brien. Commission Seeretar 



>UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center IIK 1-2121 

Meets 1st Tuesday of month at ;i:3ii P.M. 

fohn M. Bransten. President, 665 - 3rd St. 

S. Morris Cox. Mills Tower 

N. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 

lose M. Kanucehl, 1445 Stockton St. 

iortlmer Flelshhacker. Jr.. 601 California SI, 

iarKaret V. (lirdiier, 2130 Fulton St. 

Bdward B. Heavey, 68 Post St. 

Hilton K. Irfpetlch, 1655 Polk Street 

tfrs. J. Henry Mohr, 2 Castenada Ave. 

lev. William Turner. 1642 Brnderick St. 

'homas W. S Wu. D.D.S . 1111 Stockton SI. 

William R. Holman, Librarian 

Frank A. Clarvoe, Jr., Secretary 



UBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 
287 City Hall 
Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 



Ituart N. Greenber^, President. 765 Folsom St. 
lert Simon. 1350 Folsom St. 
SeorKe P. Hansen. 215 Market St. 
:homas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 
•homas F. Stack. 703 Market St. 

Robert C. Kirkwood. Manager of Utilities 

Jamus J. Finn. Secretary 

Bureaus and Departments 
.ccounts, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

George Negri. Director 
lirport. San Francisco International. S. V. 2S 

Beiford Brown. ManaKer 761-OSO" 

letch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PK 6-70U0 

Oral L. Moore. Uen. JIgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Engineering Bureau 
lunicipai Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. FI 0-5056 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
'ersonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning. Director 
'ubiic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons. Director 
l/ater Department, 425 Mason St. PR 6-7000 

James H. Turner, General Manager 



UBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
585 Bush St. 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday eacli 
at 9:30 A.M. 



«lliam P. Scott, Jr., President. 249 Natoma St. 

*r. Xavier Barrios, 2325 Ocean Ave. 

ten Blumenthal, 682 Mission St. 

Irs. Margaret U. Murray, S Ix)cksley Drive 

Irs. Jacqueline Smith. 557 - 10th Ave. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 
Mrs. Kulala Smith. Secretary to Commission 



ECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4866 



ITalter A. Haas, Sr.. President. 98 Battery St. 

eter Bercut. 1333 Jones St. 

[ary Margaret Casey. 532 Mission St. 

William M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

ohn F. Conway. Jr.. 3000 Third St. 

)r. Francis J. Herz, 460 Sutter St. 

Irs. Joseph A. Moore. Jr., 20OO Washington St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
Mary B. Connolly. Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

626 Golden Gate Ave. UN 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 

Everett Griffin. Chairman, 405 California St. 
James K Black. Jr.. 1 Hush St. 
James A. Folger. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
I^wrcncc R. Palnclos. 356 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman. Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann. Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

450 Mi-Alllster SI. 

Meets every Wednesihiv at 2 l'.,M. 



Hi: 1-2121 



James M. Hamill, President, 120 Montgomery St. 
James M. Crane, 333 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Dlez, 2261 - 36th Ave. 
William T. Reed. 2161 - 18th Ave. 
Martin F. Wormuth. 4109 Pacheco 

Ex-Officio Members 
President. Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce. Secretary 



WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans liuilding I\ 

M.-.ts 2nd Thursday each jiionlh al :i 

Kilph.l A SI, 111, rt.sident. 434 Brannan S 

i:ii-. Hi I' r..iin. II, Jjr, Bush St. 

I'liilip .s I : , :; i:: .S;insome 

i''ir'liiii- I ':iiiiiKi^;in.|l, :{00 Montgomery St. 

George T. Davis. Ill Sutter St. 

Frank A. Flynn. liiOl Noriega St. 

Prentis C, Hale. Inlernational BIdg. 

Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 

Harold E. Hubbard. 6100 Geary Blvd. 

Wilson Meyer. 333 Montgomery St. 

Samuel D. Sayad. 35 Aptos Ave. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 
E. L,awrence George. Executive Secreta 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building 1 



George D. Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg.. Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Raymond D. BozzinI, Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 

Frank J. O'Conneil. Market Master MI 7-9423 

CORONER 

850 Bryant St. Kl. 3-1694 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue 11 lO 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-8000. Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott, Director 

County Clerk- Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin Mongan. 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers. 156 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Ba.-iil Healey. 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

John J. Klordan. 150 Otis 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry. Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns. Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospilal Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou. Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

l>juis A. Moran. Superintendent MO 4-1580 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. E. Albers. Superintendent Ml 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Karl Blake. Adm. Superintendent HE 1-2800 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 

R. Brooks Darter. 

Assistant Director. Administrative 

3. Myron Tatarlan 

Asst. Director. Maintenance and Operations 



Bureau! 
Accounts, 260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

J. J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 266 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Charles W. Griffith. City Architect 
Building Inspection, 450 McAllisler SI. HE 1-2121 

Itoli.rt ('. U-vy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army HE 1-2121 

A- H. I'Ikenberg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. 450 .McAllister SI. HE I-2I21 

Sidney Franklin, Supervisor 
Egineerlng. 359 <'lty Hall HE 1-2121 

(•llfr.ird J. GeiTlz. Cllv Rngineer 
Sewer Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army St. 

Wallir 11. Joii.s. Supirintendcnt HE 1-2121 

Street CIc.Tning. 2:i2:i Army St. HE 1-2I2I 

l:.'iii:ircl .\1. 1 Tolly. Superlntendi-nt 
Street Rep.iir. 2:;2:; Army St. HE 1-2121 

cliail.s Mihaihlen, Acting Superintendent 
Urban Renewal. I.Ml .McAllister St. HE 1-2121 

Bernaril A. Cuminlngs. Analyst 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall HE I-2I21 

Hvn Benjis. Purchaser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 

nt and Supplies. 15th and Harrison Sts. 



REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Phlllp D. Rezos. Director of Properly 
James T. Graham. Auditorium Mgr' 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park nA 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Diiicoin Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April, June, Oct. 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President, 

2 Pine St. 
Mrs. Alexander Albert, 2320 Lyon St. 
E. Raj-mond Arinsby, 2363 Larkin St. 
Louis A- Benoist. 37 Drumm St. 
Joseph M. Bransten. 665 - 3rd St. 
Walter E. Buck, 235 Montgomerv St, 
Walter S, Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 
Mrs. Bruce Kelhain. 15 Arguello Blvd. 
Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 
David Pleydell-Bouverle. Glen Ellen. Calif. 
.Mrs. Henry Potter Ru.ssdl. 1420 Montgomery SI. 
John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 
William R. Wallace. 100 Hush St. 
Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellcrbach. 1 Bush St. 

t^x-Officio Members 
Mayor 
President. Recreation & Park Commission 

Thomas Carr Howe. Jr.. Director 

Capt. David J. Walsh. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gale Park HA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Moil. Jan.. .\pril. June. Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs. George Cameron. Honorary President. 
Hillsborough 

Avery Brundage. Honorary Trustee 

Miss I.oul.se A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

R. Owin Follls. 3690 Washington SI. 

Clifford V. Heimbucher. 220 Bush SI. 

Grover A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 

Garrett McEnerney. II. 444 California St. 

Roscoe F. Oakcs. 220 Bush St. 

Charles Page. 311 California St. 

Mrs. William P. Roth. Flloli. San Mateo Co. 

Joseph O. Tobln. 1 Jones St. 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burllngaine Country Club 

Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Charles de Young Thlerlot. 1802 Florlbunda, Hills- 
borough 

Ex-Offlcio Members 

Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Richard Rheem. Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalpine. Executive Secretary 



Robert J. Ev 

PUBLIC POUND 

2600 - 16th St. MA 1-1700 

Charles W. Frledrlchs, Executive Secretary 



PRIL-MAY, 1963 



CROMN 

(Continued from Page 4 i 

More funds to hire more trained 
workers could help solve the prob- 
lem, he said. 

"When we get problems, we can't 
go back and say what shoulld have 
been done. We're faced with a re- 
ality, how to save a 15-year-old 
boy. for instance. Many could be 
worked with more effectively if we 
had better tools — more probation 
workers." 

Judge Cronin proposed these 
steps should be taken to aid the 
gix>wing juvenile problem : 

1. "A sufficient number of proba- 
tion officers, .so their case loads 
won't be so staggering that every 
youngster can't get personal atten- 
tion. We feel most of our problems 
can be placed on probation." 

2. "The ne.xt thing is more foster 
homes. The community must be- 
come interested in encoiuaging 
more people to become foster par- 
ents. This is one of the prime needs 
in San Francisco at this time. And 



there .should be proper remuneia- 
tion . 

"We should be striving to de- 
velop 'professional' foster parents 

those who could take four or five 
children at one time. We need more 
foster homes to aid the minority 
child. It's not too easy to get homes 
for Negroes." 

3. "San Francisco should provide 
another ranch-type .school or home 
for those yoimg boys — aged 10 to 
14 -who are prone to delinquent 
behavior. Sometimes we have to 
send children to the California 
Youth Authority when we .should- 
n't." 

"It is a must that San Francisco 
attempt to save at an early age 
those youngsters that can be saved 
if they are given intelligent super- 
vision in a controlled setting." 

4. A ranch-type home also should 
be provided for girls aged 12 to 16. 

Judge Cronin. 64, was appointed 
to the Superior Court bench in 1944 
by then Governor Earl Warren. 
Prior to that, he had been a Munic- 
ipal judge and served seven terms 
in the State Assembly. 



DUDUM BROS. maTke^t 

"For Your Shopping /oys. Sare Money villi the Dudum Boys 
Complete 1 Slop Shopping — Free Delirery 
HOLLOWAY at ASHTON 



JU 5-2422 



MERRILL'S DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT 

1091 MARKET ST. SCJ MARKET ST. 

San Francisco, California 

BLAIR EXCLUSIVE PIANO MOVERS 

Statewide Moving 

1894 FOLSOM ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Home Phone: JU 6-6234 ■ Bus. Phone: MA 1-5846 

Robl. "Bob" Bcggs 

RAY CICERONE REALTY 

Specialing in 
POTRERO PROPERTY 



1 542 - 20th STREET 



VAIencia 4-9146 



UNITED ROOFING & SIDING CO. 

Since 19}? 

Johns Mansville Aluminum 8C Aiibestos Siding Applied by Experts 

Roofing of All Types - Free Estimates 

190 POTRERO AVENUE HEmlock 1-8898 

American Roof Maintenance Co. 

Roofing - Asbestos Siding 
6281 MISSION STREET PL 5-3888 

Glen MsGce DALY CITY 

SEARS & BAKER REALTORS 

Edwin C. Seares - Hall H. Baker 
2811 - 14th Ave. at West Portal Ave. LO 6-2441 San Francisco 27 

M.mh,f Sjn Frjno.c. Rcjity Board • Mulliple Luminii &Tvicc 
[iiv.nm.ni I'n.pcTly ■ H..mci • Fin.inonij .u.J R.(in.,iuinu • In.ur.,iKc 



OAKLAND SCAVENGER CO 

2601 PERALTA STREET 
TE 2-3412 

Oakland, (California 



CALIFORNIA WATER & TELEPHONE CO. 

m) MONTGOMERY ST. 
San Francisco, California 

ARTCRAFT NEON CO. 

2230 THIRD STREET 
MA 1-8282 

San Francisco, California 

Phone JUno 9-1880 

AIRPORT DRAY AGE COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
SAN FRANCISCO 28, CALIFORNIA 

AIR FREIGHT . . . Door-to-Door 

OFFICIAL PICKtJP - DELIVERY SERVICfc 

MEL-WILLIAMS COMPANY 

Canned and Frozen Food Service 

15 CALIFORNIA STREET 

EX 2-7366 

The Lowrie Paving Co., Inc. 

J. F. Lowrie, President — James W. Lowrie, Vice-President 

San Francisco Yard: 2170 Oakdalc Ave., San Francisco 24, Calif. 

R. J. Kilroy, Superintendent 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

tirading - Pavint; — Underground Construction 

Main Office and Yard: Lowrie Avenue, South San Francisco, Calif. 

(415) PO 1-2265 (415) JU 3-3574 



THE RECOf 



linner to Honor Supervisors Casey, Ertola 



Mr. I'.viil Mangnin announced 
iday that on Aug:ust 8. 1963 a 
nnei will be held to honor Super- 
sois Joseph M. Casey and Dr. 
Harlos A. Ertola at the Fairmont 
otel. The dinner will he given 
ider Iho loadeship of Mr. Magnin. 




Joseph M. Casey 

10 will also be Chairman of the 
jning. Co-chairmen of the din- 
r will be Mr. Chad Ertola and 
'. John Casey, Jr. In speaking of 
! two Supervisors, Mr. Magnin 
d, "Both Dr. Charles A. Ertola 
i Joseph M. Case.v have served 
' over eight years on the Board 
Supervisors. Both men are na- 
e sons of San Francisco. As 
jng boys they saw San Fran- 
co destroyed by the earthquake 
1 fire of 1906— Dr. Ertola from 
rth Beach and Mr. Casey from 
: Mis.sion District. For many 



laylacq French Laundry 

Reliable Laundry Service 

116 CLEMENT STREET 

SK 1-0971 



ILJER CO. 



Plumbing Fi.Mure Manufacturers 

75 WORLD TRADE CENTER 

FERRY BLDG. 



Valvolene Oil Co. 

HOO 17th STREET 

UN 1-1278 
SAN FR.ANCISCO 



TELETRONICS 

RADIO a; TV REPAIRS 

iervice for All Makes and Models 

21 Divisadero St. JO 7-2810 

Wm. W. Green, Prop. 




Charles A. Krtola 

.vcars the activities of both of these 
men in p\iblic life in San Franci.sco 
have contributed substantially to 
our city's great growth." 

Tickets may be purchased from 
either Mr. Chad Ertola (YU 1- 
SO.'iO) or Mr. John Casey (GA 1- 
2610). 



•I'fl. UN i-m:)(i — s irour .-^.Tvi 

CIVIC CENTER CLEANERS 
AND LAUNDRY 

Knil llli.ckiiiK 1 iiir .Spn iailv 

Ladies' and Gents' Alteration 

.II'.XI-; 'I'Hc P.Mh'Si i.N. I i«n. T 

61 McAllister St., San Francist 



ED LINGSCH, Realtor 

Let Us H^.ndlc Vnur 

Rc.il E^t.itc PiuMcms 

3232 MISSION STREET 

MI 8-1516 



MABEL MINTON GUEST HOUSE 

1090 PAGE STREET 
HE 1-9253 



RADIO and TV SERVICE 

Heme ArplKiriccs 
1051 Polk St. TU 5-1750 



ELECTRONIC TRAINING LABORATORY 

Electronics • TV-Color 
Communications 

Residence Trade School Approved 
for Veterans 

4111 Broadway OL 8-1114 



GEORGE KWOK - General Agent 

Manhattan Life Insurance Co., N.Y. 

752 SACRAMENTO ST. 
EX 2-0989 



Scannell Bros., Orayage 

Carroll Ave. .ind Ingalls 

VA 4-2006 

San Francisco, Calif. 



SAN FRANCISCO NATIONAL BANK 

A /^i.stDi^iii.s/iL'il A(aim,' m Baii/^nig 

MI;Mlll;U (IF KHDERAL IN.SURANCE Cl IRPI IRATH IN 
FElJERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



Coates, llcrfiirth & England 

CONSULTING ACTUARIES 

CROCKER BUILDING 

San Francisco 4 

Offices in San Francisco - Denver - Pasadena 

Telephone SUtter 1-1724 

CONTINENTAL SERVICE COMPANY 

Consulting Actuaries 

260 FIFTH STREET 

San Francisco 3, California 

RUDY KLAVER 

First Class Automobile Painting 

1125 STEINER STREET 

Telephone JO 7-4396 San Francisco 



Ellison & Sedwick 

ENGINEERS 

1045 Sansome Street 
EX 2-6698 



Pacific Coast Rubber Co. 

RAY LONG 

51 MAIN STREET 

EX 2-6963 



Mercury Pharmacy 

Prescripl'wn Specialists 

Robert J. Paltison 

1201 CHURCH STREET 

VA 4-6607 



Lera Electric Co. 

EUetrical Contracting 

GA 1-1424 

115 SHIPLEY STREET 



Argut'llo Quality 
Meat Market 

Quality Meals ■ Priced Kighl 

782 ARGUELLO BLVD. 

EV 6-9605 



Golden Gate Electric Co. 

GEORGE CL'iNE 

MI 7-6006 

85 INDUSTRIAL ST. 



John S. Russell & Co. 

Realtors 

Insurance Brokers 

645 Van Ness Ave. PR 6-2100 

San Francisco 



BILL'S TRUCKING CO. 

125 BARNEVELD 

VA 6-7050 

San Francisco 



UL-MAY. 196? 



Fire Stutioii ToMiie House Fund Raising Project 

Mrs. R.ilph K. Dnvies' renowned fire .sl;ition towne house .it 1088 Green 
Sirici «,i5 the loc.ile on Sund.iy. M.iy 26. for 180 friends of Children's D.iy 
l^omes who gvilhered in n hi^hlv successful reception iind dinner ns a fund 
r.iiMni; pro'.-.t 



Xf!^^. Vp 



1088 




Members of the San Fr-incisco Fire Department who assisted Mrs. Davies 
and Mrs. Rush in the luncheon are: 

Standing (1. to r.): Chiefs Operator Thomas Floyd, Captain Milton 
McMahon, Mrs. Ralph K. Davies, Mrs. R. Stockton Rush, Chief Operator 
William Cochran. 

Front (I. to r.): Fireman Arthur Mclntyrc, Chief's Operator William 
Murray, Fireman Larry Kelly. 



STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

815 BRYANT ST. at 6th MArket 1-3063 

San Francisco 5, California 

COATES, HERFURTH & ENGLAND 

Consulting Actuaries 

CROCKER BUILDING - SAN FRANCISCO 4 

Offices in San Francisco, Denver, Pasadena 

Telephone SUtter 1-1724 

Greetings 
JosKi'ii J. DiviNY, Vicc'Prcsidcnl 

INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS 

25 TAYLOR STIUET GR. 4-6(44 



Thomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
Lombard 4-0180 



aiskctKill, B.i9ckill, Foorb.iir, S.ilthall, Goll, Traclc, Tennia, Bowlini; 
Uniforms. Tr»plilcs &. MecLiU. Ski RcnI.ils, Hiintine, Fiihini! 

FLYING GOOSE SPORTING GOODS 

H0-( TARAVAL STREET San Fmncisco 16. &li(. MOntroac 1 1< 



?iorth Beach French-Italian Bakery 

516 GREEN STREET 
DOuglas 2-4654 



EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Newesl Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational View 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-292^ 

Reasonable Rates — Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 



GLEN PARK SELF-SERFICE LAUNDRY 

CLARA POLTMAN 
2842 Diamond St. Telephone JU 7-5693 San Francisco, Calif, 



Mme. J. G. DUPORT 

MODEL FRENCH LAUNDRY 

1861 UNION STREET 

Phone WEst 1-5984 San Francisco 9, California 

MARCONI BRAND 

SWISS AMERICAN SAUSAGE CO. 

35 Williams Avenue Phone: ATwater 8-540C 

San Francisco, California 

Medical Pharmacy STONESTOWN 

Prescription Pharmacists) 

FREE City-wide Delivery Service 

595 BUCKINGHAM WAY 

STONESTOWN LO 6-7734 

MADRID HOTEL 

Clean Rooms - Reason.ihlc R.ites 

MR. 6? MRS. HOWARD BACON 

22 SOUTH PARK STREET 

CiA 1-'»561 San Francisco 



SHELLEY 

(Continued from Page 7 1 

k democratic form of govcrn- 

it. 

■lis record in Congress proves 

to be a man who puts the wel- 
I of San Francisco ahead of any 
;ial groups in our social or eco- 
lic community. In short, he is 
rofessional public servant spe- 
Izing in San Francisco." 
fter six years in Sacramento, 
was elected to Congress at a 
;ial election in 1949 to succeed 
late Representative Richard J. 
ch. Republican, His service in 
jhington since then has em- 
;ed not only activity in behalf 

shipbuilding, redevelopment, 
Lsit and other problems, but in- 
led membership on the im- 
;ant Appropriations Committee, 
s has given him an insight into 
lie service such as is afforded 
' a few Congressmen. 
tVhether we like to or not," 
Hey told the AFL-CIO Com- 
tee on Political Education this 
ith (May 8i at the San Fran- 
o Labor Temple, "the fact is 
; today, because of the direction 
economy has taken in the past 
rears, no single community can 
e its problems in, of and by 
If." 

[e declared housing and rede- 
ipment to be a particular prob- 

requiring vigorous local lead- 
lip. The alternative is a San 
ncisco that will be "a concrete 
fie providing housing only for 
le who on the one hand can 
rd rents of $350 a month and 
'ards and on the other hand for 
ie of restricted income who are 
led into low-income public 
sing units." 

rhis is wrong," said Shelley. 
is makes no provision for the 
led mechanic, the white collar 
ker and the other members of 

middle class that is the hard 
; of our American democracy." 
lousing for the middle income 
up rates with improved mass 



transportation at the top of Shel- 
ley's agenda. 

He admits again that candni' 
and frankness that has upset the 
political experts and wiseacres 
that the specific answer to these 
and other city problems may not 
yet be apparent. But he insisted 
that with the right leadei-ship, the 
right answers can and will be 
found. 

He has already begun a survey 
of 393 civic and professional or- 
ganizations in San Francisco for 
their views on community needs, 
and from the areas of agreement a 
program can be achieved. 

"Leadership is what it takes," 
he told COPE, "and the ability to 
recognize that the large financial 
interests and the big taxpayers and 
the home owners and the working 
man and woman must learn to 
work together as well as to live 
together." 

Of specific interest to municipal 
workers was Shelley's declaration 
that he would uphold the Charter 
concept of city pay and working 
conditions comparable to those in 
private industry. 

"I know this concept is right," 
he said, "and you have my word 
that as your Mayor I will protect 
it in every instance." 

Shelley's philosophy of govern- 
ment is as straightforward as 
everything else about the man; 

"I firmly believe that the future 
of America lies west of the Rockies 
and that San Francisco is the hub 
of that future. 

"To fulfill that destiny, San 
Francisco must have better hous- 
ing, better transit, better educa- 
tion, better community services, 
better vision — a totally better cli- 
mate for cultural, civic and citizen 
growth. 

"I have always fought for those 
humane, liberal principles upon 
which the economic welfare and 
personal freedoms of every one of 
us depends. I believe they are the 
key to San Francisco's future 
greatness." 



New Method Laundry & Dry Cleaners 

All Tour Laundering and Cleaning Prohleins 

Soh'cd with One Call. 

MA. 1-0545 407 Sanchez Street 

Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Established 1894 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 
Executive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UN.Ierhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, California 



REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 

1600 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 9, California 

PRospect 6-0880 



VOLKSWAGEN 

— Distributors — 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - NORTHERN NEVADA - UTAH 




BALD? 

The Answer 

^ the amazing new 

TAYLOR 
TOPPER 

.JiMlkk World's first practical hair piece! 

y" "N Absolutely undetectable. Patented 

ft I plasic base. As easy to put on as 

J * -^ ^ your hat. 

No net — no glue — no fuss — no mess! 

TAYLOR TOPPER, INC. 

1641 EL CAMINO REAL 
Millbrae California., Dept. 294 

5 minutes from San Francisco Intl. Airport 



RIL-MAY, 196? 



BAY WINDOW 

(Continued from Page 3i 

whelming re-election to his first 
public office of Edmund Gerald 
Brown, a man who now holds dual 
citizenship in San Francisco and 
Sacramento. And Florence, wc 
know, now holds the same kind of 
dual citizenship - in San Francisco 
still as well as in Vallejo. 

Incidentally, with such a wealth 
of practical political background 
it is not at all surprising that her 
osvn ovenvhelming election was 
accomplished on a meager cam- 
paign fund of $2,300. After all 
those years of being on the man- 
aging end of the business, she 
knew exactly how a candidate 
should most effectively and most 
economically achieve election. 

We congratulate the City of 
Vallejo for having acquired as its 
first lady mayor a most rare and 
wonderful human being. It will be 
a richer community for all its citi- 
zens during the years in office of 
Mayor Florence! 

POSTSCRIPT TO THE MAYOR : 
The number of dinners given in 
honor of San Franciscans and ar- 
ranged by Florence defies recall. 
She has always been at the ready 
when it came to organizing testi- 
monials of all kinds. It is indeed 
pleasant now to note that the 



proud people of Vallejo will gather 
on Saturday night. May 2.'i. at the 
Casa de Vallejo Hotel to pay honor 
to Mayor Florence. It is our hunch 
they will be joined that night by a 
goodly representation from San 
Francisco. 

ANOTHER LADY IN THE 
NEWS: Right here m San Fran- 
cisco another lady continued to pile 
up a long list of news-making 
"firsts" by being the first woman 
to deliver the featured talk at the 
annual Mothers' Day breakfast of 
the South of Market Boys Associa- 
tion. 

Up to now the 39-year histoiy of 
the traditional affair had been 
marked by a .succession of male 
speakers e.xtolling Mother. High 
time they had a Mother talk about 
Mother: Meet Mrs. Ralph Duhagon 
who, to complete the distaff take- 
over, was introduced by Judge 
Lcnore Underwood, 

Mrs. Duhagon. one of the prime 
movers and shakers in the com- 
munity life of North Beach, in 1959 
was the first woman to sei-ve as 
president of the annual Columbus 
Day Festival. As we recall, it was 
at that time that she brought to 
San Francisco as principal speaker 
of the celebration another not un- 
known member of her sex, Claire 
Booth Luce. 

Last January Mrs. Duhagon was 
named one of The Examiner's 1962 



A&B LaDew 
Engineerings Inc. 



1370 WALLACE AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
MIsHion 8-85«.'^ 



EL FAKO GROCERY 

2 599 rOI.SGM STREET 



Mission 7-9903 



Distinguished Women, an honor 
she must have particularly appre- 
ciated because of her own many 
years of columning for the North 
Beach paper, The Little City News. 

MEN MAKE NEWS, TOO: Jim 
Turner had a dam named in his 
honor luider circumstances that 
were real interesting because the 
dam hasn't been built yet! . . . The 
explanation is entirely sensible, 
however: Since the head of San 
Franci.sco's Water Department is 
due for a September retirement, it 
was decided to pay him this honor 
at the start -rather than at the 
completion. . . . We appreciated a 
line in the News Call's editorial 
salute to him: "No one is irre- 
placeable, but Jim Turner comes as 
close to it as anyone can." . . . 
Another San Franciscan offered to 
retire IF the Governor appointed 
Attorney Brooks Berlin as his suc- 
cessor. Making the offer was ven- 
erable 87-year-old Superior Judge 
Tim Fitzpatrick. But the Gov — a 
good friend of Berlin, incidentally 
— said Nope. Which leaves Judge 
Tim, who's been on the bench here 
since 1915, still sitting. . . . While 
on the mayoral front, Jack Shelley, 
Harold Dobbs, Eddie Mancuso and 
Harold Truskimoff (whose first 
action if elected, he says, will be 
to "fire every member of every 
board, if I can!") MAY be joined 
by Equalizer George R. Reilly. It 
all depends on whether George 
figures he should be drafted or not; 
if so, he'll set his patented drafting 
machine in motion — and away we 
go! . . . 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 1963 Fords 

Highest Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payment.s 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 



H. WENIGER 

Matiufacturers of 
Instruments for Hand Surgery 
Active Hand Si. Finger Splints 

70 nth STREET 
MA 1-6876 



CITY REFRIGERATION CO. 

SALES . SERVICE 

24-Hi>ur Service 

Cummcrcial - Apartment Huusc 

41 LASKIE STREET 

KL 2-3556 San Francisfo 



THE HONGKONG 
AND SHANGHAI 

BANKING 

CORPORATION 

OF CALIFORNIA 

A Subsidiary of The Hongkong Bon 
Group which has more then 140 
offices throughout the world . . . 




80 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 

er Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



Custom-Aire 
Products 

Division of Pacific Industries, Ini 

Manufacturers of 

Forced Air - Gas Fired Heaters 

& Wall Furnaces 

Air Conditioning 

• 

600 Indiana Street 
VA 6-7171 

OTAGIRI 

MERCANTILE CO., INC 

OUR NEW ADDRESS 

1400 FOLSOM STREET 

Corner of 10th HE. 1-955 



BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

Speciathls on Wheel Aligiimenl 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave. JU. 7-70; 

Bill Barca San Francisi 



THE RECO 



E FOLLIES OF 1963 
^NOONCE SUMMER 
ATINEE PROGRAM 

'he first matinee peiformance of 
Shipstads and Johnson Ice 
lies of 1963 will take place on 
urday. June 22, at 2:30. The 
t Sunday matinees will be held 
June 23 at 1:30 and 5:30. 
'hese summer weekend mati- 
s have become tremendously 
lular with residents of Northern 
ifornia communities who make 
lily outings to cool San Fran- 
:o to escape the hot weather, 
it year more than 185.000 
•thern Californians ordered Ice 
lies tickets by mail, a large per- 
tage for the weekend matinees, 
"he new edition of Ice Follies 
ns with a number entitled 
nk Champagne," a tour de force 

choreographer Fran Claudet, 
,ce director Stanley Kahn and 
tume designer Mary Wills. The 
leping pink costumes, each cov- 
i by almost fifteen pounds of 
thers, also have 35 gross of 
k jewels costing approximately 
een cents each. The total cost 

gown— $2,300. 

Tie act also features "Le Dubon- 
Trio" of Bill Thomas, Lee Car- 

and Frank Carroll, the solo 
istry of Barbara Myers as "La 
iseuse," and Dusseau and Doris 
'Valse Fascination." The num- 
is complimented by magnificent 
I, including towering cham- 
Tie glasses that pour forth a 
stant stream of brilliant 
bles. 

'he cast contains such show 
jpers as Donald Jackson, of 
)m four time World champion 
: Olympic winner. Dick Button, 
imented: "I doubt if there will 
r be such a genius on ice." The 
less Mr. Frick continues his 
lie career with "A Day in Cen- 
I Park," while such stars as Ina 
ler, the lovely German ice and 
rie star, the delightful adagio 
m from Germany, the Schil- 
;s, and Jill Shipstad, talented 
ighter of owner Roy, all add to 

variety and glamour, 
'ickets for the Ice Follies, which 
ns on Wednesday, June 19, with 
jneflt for the Mount St. Jo.seph's 
ne for Girls, are available at 
iterland. Post and Steiner, San 
Jlcisco; the Downtown Box Of- 
, 325 Mason; and at Sherman 
y, 2101 Broadway in Oakland, 
formances will be nightly at 
), e.xcept Sundays and Mondays. 



Western Clutch Co. 

Rrhuili Clutche! & Plates 

986 HARRISON ST. 
DO 2-6862 



Bell's Jewelers 

ttauli- Clock & Je»dry Rcpai 
Watch Bands 

Longines — Bulova 

7n IRVING STREET 

MO 1-1080 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Pioneer Investors 
Savings & Loan Assn. 

1701 Noriega Street 
LO 6-1300 



MAE'S 

Home for the Aged 

Also Placement Service 
453 - 43rd Ave. SK 2-4480 



Alameda Nursing Home 

Personalized Service 

1824 CENTRAL AVE. 

LA 2-8403 ALAMEDA 



Modern Launder -Eze & 
Cleaning 

Complete Washing and 
Dry Cleaning Service 

2849 BAKER STREET 

JO 7-2100 

Harry Underwood, Owner 



CARROLL BROS. 

MONOMENTS 

PL 5-2818 1730 Mission St. 

COLMA 

Between HOLY CROSS &. 

CYPRESS LAWN Cemeteries 



Comfortable Rooms 
Reasonable Rates 

BEREFORD HOTEL 

635 Sutter St. OR 3-? 

CORDOVA HOTEL 



Res. Jl I 6-16 it DE 3-7021 

WHYTE'S 

COSTOM TAILORING 

CleaninK 8C Alterations 

842 HOLLOWAY AVE. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

L. White K. Mackcy 



RAY VERNAZZA 

Angray Merchandising 
Corp. 

Import - Export 

Artificial Flowers - Plants 

Fruits - Novelties 

Florist Supplies 

525 - 6th STREET 

YUkon 2-0680 San Francisco 



Mike & Jim's Garage 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE 

Automatic Transmission Specialty 
City Towing Service 

3950 - 24th STREET 

VAlencia 6-1886 

M. FUENTES, Jr. 



House of Gigl 

. . . Cocktails . . . 

Entertainment 
Middle Eastern Music 

552 BROADWAY 

YUkon 1-6366 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Miraloma Flowers 

FLOWERS 

for 

EVERY OCCASION 

695 PORTOLA DRIVE 

OV 1-6159 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Continental Baking 
Co. 



1525 BRYANT STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



RUDY KLAVER 

First Class Automobile Painting 

1125 STEINER STREET 

Telephone JO 7-4396 

San Francisco 



THE IDEAL HOTEL 



Clean - Comfortable 
Economical 



1 5 54 STOCKTON ST. 

SU. 1-9613 



ROYAL BAKING CO. 

4773 MISSION STREET 

]U 5-9655 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CONSTRUCTION 
AGGREGATES 
CORPORATION 

Telephone DOuglas 3-1718 

503 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 5, Calif. 



Mi Rancho Super Market 

Latin-Amcilcan Fn,,ds 

3365 - 20th STREET 

MI 7-0581 

San Francisco, California 

ROY L. STRONG 
Chevron Service 

1799 Ocean Ave. DE. 3-9943 



GREEK ■ AMERICAN 
VETERAN CLUB 

161 EDDY STREET 

K&SPiston& Ring Shop 

Paul Musch, Owner 

2951 BROADWAY 

GL 1-7440 Oakland 



THE IRON POT 

Lunch - Dinners 

639 MONTGOMERY 

EX 2-2100 

San Francisco 

North Beach Bazaar 

Frank Bruno - Luigi Furneri, Props. 

HOMEWARES 
1429 Stockton St. YU 6-0685 



RIL-MAY. 1963 



FUB. LIBFLIRY PERIODICAL ROOM 

Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, Calif, 

52 X-1/59 (3077) 3630 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif, 
Permit No. 4507 



"^(xn- a aa4A cUttutci' exfre/Uettce . 




Located at 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 




MOIITUARIRS 



Fruitvnie Chapel 

nso FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIIoR 3-4114 



William O. (Bill) 

DUFFY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
TAX CONSULTANT 



2888 MISSION ST. 



AT. 24151 



CITY-COUNTY 



PERIODICAL DIP. 



,S^&IM 



(SCIBCO 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




Russell L. Wolden, Assessor, City and County of San Francisco 



NEW STRIPED BASS 
FISHING MAP IS OUT 




A revised edition of the Striped 
Bass Fishing Map is fresh off the 
presses and may be obtained from 
any office of the California Depart- 
ment of Fish and Game, the DFG 
announced this week. 

The map shows the San Fran- 
cisco Bay Area and the Delta re- 
gion where the striper abounds in 
goodly numbers. Text material ac- 
companying the map tells the 
history of the striper fishery and 
gives tips on how to catch this 
popular game fish. 

The huge striped bass fishery of 
today had a very inauspicious be- 
ginning nearly a century ago. The 
millions of fish that inhabit Central 
California waters today spnjng 
from two small plants made by 
the Department of Fish and Game. 

The first plant of 132 small bass 
brought from New Jersey was 
made in 1879. The fish were re- 
leased near Martinez. The second 
introduction of about 300 bass was 
made in lower Suisan Bay in 1882. 

Today, the sport catch accounts 
for nearly a million stripers a year 
in Bay and Delta waters and in 
the ocean between Monterey and 
San Francisco. 

But before taking off after these 
game fish, anglers are advised by 
the DFG to check current fishing 
regulations for size limit (16 
inches), bag limit I three l, and 
special closures listed in Sections 
20 through 34.95 of the Angling 
Regulations booklet. 



RAY VERNAZZA 

Angray Merchandising 
Corp. 

Import - Export 

Artificial Flowers - Plants 

Fruits - Novelties 

Florist Supplies 

525 - 6TH STREET 

YUkon 2-0680 San Francisco 



MUSCAT'S 

New Modesto 
Poultry Co. 

WHOLESALE 
RETAIL 

Live and Dressed 
Poultry 

VAlencia 4-1967 
VAlencia 4-4422 

5146-50 THIRD STREET 
San Francisco 24, Calif. 



UNderhill 1-2200 HEmlock 1-6961 

YOUR ELECTRICIAN 

EMIL J. WEBER ELECTRIC CO. 

Electrical Contracting 



258 DORLAND STREET 
San Francisco 14, California 



REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 

1600 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 9, California 

PRospcct 6-0880 



VOLKSWAGEN 

— Distributors — 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - NORTHERN NEVADA - UTAH 



anderson and perkins, inc. 

specialized collection service 

31 Geary Street 
San Francisco 8 
Phone: EXbrook 2-8466 



E. MARTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Est.iblishcd 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 
EXbrook 7-2760 



PERIODiCAL Dlt' 

JUL k^ ]yt>o 

Ban k.<«,nuiscq 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



bay 





ANOTHER SUMMER: And all aglow are we, as gaily we plunge Day Big. The most distressing 
the period of sun . fog — and fun-filled days, the words of a aftemiath of the Father Fiasco 
^ersity of California psychiatrist ringing in our ears: We, you, was in a White House advt.: "After 
I and everj' adult one of us is downing 2.6 gallons of 100-proof Father's Day Clearance" . . . 
its annually! . . . Really not too shocking, that mean.s about 13 Police Sergeant Aster McDon- 



s of Old Something per year. 
ith, say about one drink pi i 
. . . The same psychiatrist 
les an alcoholic as one who 
ks a fifth per day. So be not 
alarmed, friend; wander on 
I us in the Garden of Items: 
ke the continuing War of the 
) which recently picked up 
m when The Examiner's so- 
f editor, Frances Moffat, de- 
id to The Chronicle. It looked 
a shattering blow at first, for 
was one of the liveliest writers 
he Fourth & Market stable, 
then the E.Naminer's canny 
or Ed Dooley introduced Joan 
<Js as his "Inside Society" 
er — and she's been doing such 
markable job that The Chron- 
3 gain has been completely 
ralized . . . 

f the way, did you make the 
mer Social Register this year ? 
n Dark didn't, but his blessed 
its are — again! — acting like 
could make Everyone's Reg- 
'. At this writing, that is. Pic- 
could change by the time you 
this, brrrr . . . Poor old Dad 
't make Anyone's Register 
n. even though the stores dog- 
y tried again to make Dad's 



frai lidii more than 




TY-COUNTY RECORD 

e Magazine of Good Gorertimctit 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publisher 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14. California 
Telephone HEmloclc 1-12 12 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

' JUNE -JULY, 1963 

lume 30 Number 4 



WILLIAM BLAKE 
Supervisor 



fifth pel' ough was suspended from the po- 
lice force at about the same time 
he resigned to run for Sheriff 
against Matt Carberi-y, the simul- 
taneous development resulting 
from a Police Dept. rule prohibit- 
ing officers from seeking elective 
office ... "I will not make this an 
issue of the campaign," McDon- 
ough said resignedly. And what 
might your Tom Swifty be? . . . 
On another level, the space race 
spawned some wonderful head- 
lines: "A CHASE IN THE SKY? 
. . . "DATE WITH SPACE GIRL 
IN SKY? . . . But Supei-visor Bill 
Blake, undaunted, just wanted to 
find out if San Francisco needs 
200 more policemen to make safe 
its streets as claimed by fellow 
Supervisor and mayoral Candidate 
Harold S. Dobbs. And when his 



PRODUCTION, ELECTRONICS & 

AERO-OYNAMIC LODGE 1327 

I. A. of M., AFL-CIO 



colleagues turned down his pro- 
posed resolution asking Mayor 
Christopher and the Police Com- 
mission to say this campaign asser- 
( Continued on Page 14) 



Helicopter 

TO SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT 

Downtown S.F. — Berkeley 
Oakland — Sunnyvale 

Scheduled Passenger Service 
Connecting With All Lines 

Also Sightseeing Flights and 
Service to Bay Area Cities 

SFO HELICOPTER AIRLINES 

YU 1-7750 

World Trade Center 
San Francisco 



STANLEY P. SATTERFIELO 

QUALITY PAINTING & 
PAINT BURNING 

Residential — Commercial 
Industrial 

Licensed Contractor 

INSURED FOR P.D. &. P.L. 

1553 FULTON 
FI 6-9632 



IE -JULY, 1963 



RUSSELL L. WOLDEN 

ASSESSOR 
City and County of San Francisco 



By DEAN ST. DENNIS 



In the fiscal year 1962-63, the San Francisco assessor's office com- what it sees about assessments, 

piled a total assessment roll of $2,211,875,031. they are urged to complain to the 

It reflected assessments on 160,000 land parcels, 155,000 building assessor's office," the aide ex- 
parcels, and the personal property of nearly every resident of the city — plained. 
plus commercial inventories. "Wolden invites these people into 

When the assessment rolls were presented to the Board of Super- his office to discuss the complaints, 

visors — sitting as a Board of Equalization — there were only seven He points out to them what his 

complaints from taxpayers. job is, and most of the complaints 

And that, says an aide, is perhaps the most meaningful tribute end right there. They usually are 

that can be paid to the work of San Francisco Assessor Rii.s.sell L. .satisfied that they are being 



Wolden. 

The tiny number of complaints 
has never varied greatly since 
Wolden first took office in 1938. 

As a young attorney, he became 
the chief assistant to his ill father, 
then the city's assessor, and was 
appointed to the post by then 
Mayor Angelo Rossi. 

He was elected to a full term in 
1939. and has been re-elected by 
whopping margins in 1942, 1946, 
1950, 1954, 1958, and 1962. 

Last year, for instance, he faced 
four opponents and captured 87 
per cent of the vote. 

In the knowledge of his staff 
members, he is the only county 
assessor in the Nation who is an 
attorney. He is, incidentally, ad- 
mitted to practice before all courts 
in California and the U. S. Su- 
preme Court as well. 

"By law. his job as assessor 



treated just like their neighbors." 

The job is not without its diffi- 
culties. As Wolden says: 

"I urge every citizen, every city 
official and all taxpayers groups 
to keep in mind our extremely 
limited taxable area in San Fran- 
cisco. 

"We should think not twice, but 
many times, before agreeing to any 
proposals by State, Federal, or 
Municipal agencies to take prop- 
eily off the tax rolls and thereby 
shrink the local tax base, adding 
a heavier burden to remaining ta.x- 
able property." 

An aide said Wolden has fought 
for years to maintain a system 
where every person — and every 
business firm — would pay his fair 
share of the taxes, 
the board, they are put on display For instance, the aide said, ship- 
for three weeks in the assessor's ping companies here for many 
office — and all taxpayers are in- years were assessed. But, the aide 




RUSSELL WOLDEN 

Assessor 



means that he must place a value ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ inspect them, said, each year the Board of Super- 



for tax purposes on every bit of 
taxable property in the city — everj- 
foot of tax land and every build- 
ing, and evei-j' piece of personal 
property," an aide said. 

"The assessor's job, by the na- 
ture of the work, cannot be con- 
sidered a popular one. However, 
it's quite apparent that the people 
of San Francisco are quite satisfied 
with his work in a complicated 
field." 

The aide said that the assessor's 
job is to place value on property in 
an equitable manner — "so that the 
burden of taxation falls equally on 
all classes of taxpayers." 

"His work is accepted by the 
public as being so well done, that 
when each July 1 the assessment 
rolls are given to the Board of 
Supervisors, there have been few 
instances where taxpayers found 
cause to complain." 

When those rolls are given to 



"And if the public doesn't like vi.sors would reduce the assess- 



Parisian Baking Co, 



1995 Evans Ave. 



VA 6-1273 



San Francisco, Calif. 



JACK TAR HOTEL 

Van Ness and Geary 

PRospect 6-8200 

San Francisco, California 



ments to nothing. However, W( 
each year kept assessing the 
spite of the board's action. 

Finally, the aide said, the 
panics went to the State Lej 
ture and were exempted. 

As chairman of the Legisl 
Committee of the State Ass 
tion of County Assessors, W 
spends part of each year in S 
mento — fighting to protect 
taxpayers' interests. 

"He tries to fight legisl 
(Continued on Page 10 1 



ALITALIA 
AIRLINES 



Super DC-8 Rolls Royce Jet-L 
Services from the U.S.A. and < 
ad.i to Europe, and the Near I 
Asia, Africa and Australia. 

Immediate connections by 
CARAVELLE JET 

EX 7-4848 
364 POST ST. 



The Bank of Tok; 
Of California 

Head Office, San Francisco 

64 Sutter Street 
YU 11200 

Buchanan and Sutter Sfs. 
Fl 6-7600 

San Jose Branch 

1 336 N. First Street 
298-2411 



Around and About 



ISj WIUT IIENKY 

tore and more emphasis is being placed on retirement plans and 
IS for a more leisurely way of life. To some unknown soul I am in- 
ted for the following Retirement Work Sheet: 
:00 a.m. — Wake up and laugh at 



at a 1 a r m clock which was 

led off the night before. 

;00 to 7:01 a.m. — Brisk calis- 

Ucs in bed. 

:01 to 9:00 a.m. — Go back to 

P- 

;00 to 9:30 a.m.- Debate wheth- 

shave; then decide not to. 

;30 to 10:00 a.m.— Breakfast - 
rbon. toast, bacon, eggs, coffee. 
):aO to 11:00 a.m. — Give wife 
jrs of the day and point out er- 

1 of previous day. 
1:00 to 11:15 a.m.— Coffee and 
rbon break — reclining on sofa. 



gravy, salad, vine rose, and coffee. 

9:30 to 11:59 p.m.— Discuss with 
wife why world is going to pot. 
Lay out work schedule for her for 
ne.Nt day. 

11:59 to 12:00 p.m.— Go to bed 
with second good book of the day 
to improve mind. Throw book out 
of window and go to sleep. 



May I suggest a way to possibly 
lure more people to ride the Munic- 
ipal Railway ? Sell weekly passes 
that would be good at any time on 

1:15 to 12:15 p.m. — Front porch any line! A weekly pass would 

fing chair session. Make plans eliminate the time consuming work 

liow to spend the morrow in a of making change and i.ssuing 

structive way. transfers, and would speed the 

2:15 to 12:30 p.m. — Highball loading and unloading of passen- 

1 neighbor next door. gers. The average man who uses 

2:30 to 1:30 p.m. — Lunch — beer, the Muni to commute spends $1.50 

Iwich, apple pie and cheese. a week going to and from work. 

:30 to 1:35 p.m. — Read book to Nights and Saturdays and Sundays 

rove mind. he uses the family car. Why not a 

:35 to 3:00 p.m. — Coffee and pass for, say, $3.00? For the house- 

rbon break. wives a pass for less money could 

:00 to 4:45 p.m. — Back porch be issued that would be good only 

cing chair session to get full during the off-peak load hours. Say 

eflt of afternoon sun. Review from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. and 

■ning's plans for the morrow, after 7:00 p.m. in the evening. Al- 

ide to postpone plans. low the school children to use a 

:45 to 5:00 p.m. — Inspect vege- pass that does not require punch- 

le garden, pointing out to wife ing by the operator plus the issu- 

!re she should do more hoeing. ing of transfers. This plan might 

:00 to 8:30 p.m. — Cocktail hour, work and if it should it would les- 

:30 to 9:30 p.m. — Dinner — sir- sen the automobile congestion and 

steak, mashed potatoes and (Continued on Page 111 



Pacific Coast Builders 

No. 1 South Park 
San Francisco 

Greens' Eye and Ear Hospital 

Bush Street at Octavia 
San Francisco 

WEst 1-4300 



CONTINENTAL SERVICE COMPANY 

260 FIFTH STREET 
San Francisco 3, California 



A. W. FERBER 

President 



D. C. BAKER 

Manager 



Baker Bros. Auto Body Inc. 

Foreign Car Specialists 

MArket 1-6232 - Saturd.nys 8:00-1:00 
140 HAYES STREET SAN FRANCISCO 2 

Brotherhood of Teamsters 
and Auto Truck Drivers 

Local No. 70 of Alameda County 

826 West Street Oakland 7, Calif. 

JOHN SWEENEY, Secretary-Treasurer 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 



Old Floors M.nde Like New 
New Floors Installed 
Cleaning - Waxing 



Residential - Commercial 
All Work Guaranteed 
City Wide Service 



Town & Country Hardwood Floors 

LAID • SANDED • REFINISHED 
Free Estimates Gladly JUniper 7-7420 Day or Sight 

JOHN J. OMALLEY, Onner 

LARRABURV BROS. INC. 

The Bakers Who Made San Francisco French Bread Famous* 

Sold in Most Markets 

363 THIRD AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 21 

BAyview 1-41 12 

•■■B.ikcrs' Day" Award. P. P. I.E.. Firsl Pri:c. San Francisco. 1015 

TED'S 

Auto Body & Fender Repair 

Free Estimates - MArket 1-1400 

1570 WALLER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 17, CALIF. 

T. F. Sanchez 



^JE-JULY, 1963 



Supervisor Charles Eretola 



Dr. Charles Ertola has been 
working for the benefit of San 
Francisc for many years. 

Charlie Ertola has served his 
City as a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the Opera House; as 
Chairman of the Veterans Build- 
ing; as Commander of his Ameri- 
can Legion Post, Galileo No. 236; 
as Commander of the 7th Di-strict 
and Commander of the San Fran- 
cisco County Council of the Ameri- 
can Legion; as Foreman of the 
1954 Grand Jury; along with serv- 
ing as President of many other 
civic organizations. 

Charlie Ertola has also served 
the State of California. He was a 
Commissioner of the Agriculture 
District lA. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Faculty of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons as Assist- 
ant Superintendent o f the Dental 
Clinic. 

He was appointed to the Board 
of Supervisors by Mayor Elmer 
Robinson and subsequently twice 
elected to that Board. He also 
served one term as President of the 
Board of Supervisors. 

Dr. Charlie Ertola served in the 
United States Na\y. He resides at 
775 Francisco Street with his wife, 
Marie, al.'so a native of San Fran- 




DR. CHARLES A. ERTOLA 

Cisco. They are the proud parents 
of John A. Ertola, a practicing at- 
torney in San Francisco and the 
father of two children, and Chad 
Ertola, recently promoted to As- 
sistant Vice-President of the First 
Western Bank, and father of one 
daughter. 

His long list of activities in civic 
endeavor has always been with ut- 
most sincerity and honesty. He has 
always given of himself unselfishly 
and untiringly. 



920 Ta 



HELEN K. ANDERSON 

Realtor — Insurance 
Home: DA 2-1398 Office: OV 1-7370 

raval Street San Francisco 16 

Member Multiple Listing Service 



EDUCATIONAL GUIDANCE CENTER 

SCHOOL AND HOME 
ON THE PENINSULA 

A Wonderland for Children 5-10 



Education - Recreation - Guidance 

Understanding - 3 Rs 

Directed by Master Teachers 

READING SPECIALISTS 

Counselling Service for Parents 
Tests - Tutoring 

SUMMER PROGRAM 

For Interview Call DAvenport 3-8862 
450 Melville Ave., Palo Alto DA 3-8862 




Yeilow 
Cab 

at your service 




quick 
dependable 




MAdison 
5-1234 




Yellow 
Cab 

at your service 



Bay Counties District Council of Carpenters 

SAN FRANCISCO AND VICINITY 

Office: 240 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 2, Calif. 

Telephone: PRospect 1-2065 

A. A. FIGONE, Presidcil C. R. BARTALINI. Sec.Trea 

Jordan and Smith, Masonry Contractor 

Fireplaces, Brick, Slone & Block Work 

137 - lOTH AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 18 

Phones: BA 1-3523 and SE 1-3712 

Plumbing — Alterations — Repairs 



PLUMBING 



ALTERATIONS — REPAIRS 



DON KANE 



1328 Fairfax Ave. 



Phone: MI 7-2161 



SKY-WAY BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rey. Marshall S. De Vaughn, Pastor 

S.S. 9:30-Worship 10:50 .A.M. and 7 P.M.-Day Nursery 

Kindergarten Monday - Friday. Age 3-6 years 

300 GAVIN ST. - DE 3-5272 Nursery - DE 3-2302 



The Ruth Wilkins Raymond 

Private High School, Inc. 

Co-Educational — Accredited 

Non-Sectarian 

3636 Washington Street 

San Francisco 18, California 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Fall Term — Sept. 10 

PHONE: Fillmore 6-5906 

Ruth Wilkins Ravniond 

Owner .ind Principal 



FARMERS 
INSURANCE GROUP 

BERT WEIBLE 

2141 LOMBARD ST. 

JO 7-1860 

San Francisco 



ELLEY ANNOUNCES LOW 
;OME HOUSING GRANT 
R SAN FRANCISCO 

ongiessiiian John F. Shelley an- 
nced a grant to the San Fian- 
o Development Fund to test 
feasibility of providing cooper- 




him 



JOHN F. SHELLEY 

re housing for low income group 

lilies on a conditional purchase 

a. 

helley said the $244,607 grant 

! made by the Housing and 

Tie Finance Agency under the 



IStei Housing Act which authorizes 
>; rants for the development and 
testing of new ways of providing 
housing for low income families. 

Shelley said sixty low income 
group families will be selected. 
They will be located in three re- 
newal ai'eas in San Francisco. The 
identity of the families selected for 
the program will not be made pub- 
lic. 

The families selected will be 
mixed in with moderate income 
families. Shelley said the rent for 
Uie participating families will be 
bused on their incomes with a sub- 
sidy payment from the federal 
Krant making up the difference. 
The subsidy arrangement will con- 
tinue for not more than four years 
after which, if all goes well, these 
families can pui'chase the units in 
which they lived. 

Shelley said. "This dramatic pro- 
gram is an effort to provide low 
income housing without resorting 
to monolithic institutionalized pro- 
jects." 

Shelley said the grant will be 
administered by the San Francisco 
Development Fund, a newly formed 
and nonprofit-making organization. 

Mr. William Roth, Mr. John May 
and Mr. J. F. Thatcher are board 
members of the Fund. 



)CEAN SHORE 
IRON WORKS 

Complete Boiler 8C 
Tank Repair 

1660 JERROLD AVENUE 
Mission 7-5737 



B&D 
Speedo -Tachograph 

SERVICE 

Service on Speedometers, Tach- 
ometers, Sangamo Tachographs 
and Clocks 

575 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
UNderhill 3-283 J 



Office 

PLaza 5-3888 
PLaza 5-4695 



Res. 
JUno 3-8087 



American Roof Maintenance Co. 

ROOnNG &. ASBESTOS SIDING 
6281 Mission Street 



DAN MAGEE 




BEST QUALIFIED 



MOST EXPERIENCED 



Elect "EDDIE" 

ANCUSO 

MAYOR 



INTENSIVE REVIEW SESSION 
STARTS-AUGUST 19TH 
Boys • Girls • Adults 
7th through 12th Grades 

ALL CODRSES ACCREDITED 

"Prep" for Entrance Exams for 
West Point, Annapolis, Air Force, 
Coast Guard, Maritime Acadamies, 
Naval Reserve and College Board. 

ENGLISH FDR FOREIGNERS 

Laboratory Chemistry for Nurses 

SECRETARIAL CODRSES 

Regular High School Courses 

Accelerated (two years in one) 

Private Tutoring - Day and Night 

DREW SCHOOL 

2901 California St., San Francisco 
FI 6-4831 



C and C PET SHOP 

Doggie Beauty Salon - Pet Supplies 
Poodles - Puppies - Studs 

JIMMIE CLAUSEN 

Licensed Professional Hatidler 

6303 College Ave., Oakland, Calif. 

OLympic 8-2187 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 



FRANK ORMAN 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

DE 3-6359 

205 GRANADA AVE. 
San Francisco 



Real Estate 



Insurance 



FRANK 

BLDG. & LANO CORP. 

TWX-SF 1174 
F. C. FRANK, Conlraclor 

1500 GENEVA AVENUE 
DE 3-1230 San Francisco 24 



24 Hour Towing 
24 Hour Road Serricc 

G & B GARAGE 

GEORGE BROWN 

Complete Automotive Repairs 

Body &C Fender - Painting 
Mechanical 

OV 1-9282 -OV 1-2155 

1271 - 48th Avenue 

San Francisco 22. Calif. 



SEARES & BAKER 
REALTORS 

Edwin C. Scares - Hall H. Baker 

Member S. F. Really Board 
Multiple Listing Service - Homes 
Investment Property - Insurance 

Financing and Refinancing 
2811 14th Ave. at West Portal 
LO 6-2441 San Francisco 27 



Donohoe & Carroll 

MONUMENTS 

Office: Opp. Holy Cross Cemetery 

MO 4-3415 — PL 5-5251 

COLMA 



NE-JULY, 1963 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



"*T.,rri,y I.all MA 1-0163 

Oftorne Cliristophcr. Mayor 

Jnhn P. Sullivan. Kxerutlve Secretary 
RoliiTt M. Smalley. Conllclcntlal Secretary 
Mnrftarct Smitli. Personal Secretary 
John U Moolz. AdinlnlRtrntlvc Assistant 
noherl rtockwell. Public Service Director 
Irwin .T. Mussen, I'rban Renewal Coordinator 
Cyril J. Roihe, Principal Administrative Analyst 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

235 Citv Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 

Peter Taniaras, President. 1020 Harrison 

William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 

Rocer noas. 232.'1 Geary St. 

.Toseph M. Caspv. 2.128 Ocean Ave. 

Harold S. Dohbs. SSI California St. 

r>r. Cliarles A. Ertnla. 2SS Columbus Ave. 

.lohn .1. Ferdon. 1S5 Montcomerj- St. 

J. Max Moorn, .-,:1S Potroro Ave. 

Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 

.lack Morrison. 2snn Greenwich St. 

.Toseph V. Tinnev. 2S17 Mission St. 

Robert .T. Polan. Clerk 

I.llllan M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — Boas, Blake. 

County "state and National Affairs — Ferdon, Dobbs. 

McMahon , , 

Education. Parks and Recreation— Ertola, Blake, 

Finance, Revenue and Taxation — Dobbs, Ferdon, 
Halley 

Judiciary, Jjeelslative and Civil Service— Tinney, 
McMahon, Morrison 

Police — Casey, Ertola, Tinney 

Public Buildines. Lands and City Planning— Mor- 
rison. Boas. Tinney 

Fublic Health and Welfare — McMahon. Halley. Mor- 
rison 

Public rtillties— Hallev. Dobbs, Ferdon 

Streets and HiEhwav.s— Blake. Boas. Ertola 

Rules — Tamaras. Dobbs. Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

101 Citv Hall KL. 2-1910 

Russell L. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

200 Citv Hall HE 1-1322 

Thomas M. O'Conrnr 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

ssii Brvant St. KL. 3-9111 

Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDIER 

S.-,0 Bryant St. KL 3-1671 

Edward T. Mancuso 

SHERI FP 

331 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Matthew C. Carberry 

TREASURER 

110 city Hall HE 1-2121 

John J. (Joodwin 



COURTS 



UN 1-8562 

C. Harold Caulfleld. Presiding 

Raymond J. Arata Edward Molkenbuhr 

Carl H. Allen Clarence W. Morris 

livron Arnold Harry J. Neubarth 

John W. Bus.sey William A. (VBrion 

Walter Carpeneti Raymond J. OConno 

.Melvyn I. Cronin Edward V. ODay 

.Vurman Elkington Charles S. Peery 

.Joseph Karesh George W. Schonfeld 

(lerald S. Ijevin William F. Traver,so 

Francis McCarty Alvln H. Weinberger 

John B. .Mollnari H. A. van der Zee 

Joseph M. <'ummins, Secretary 

480 City Hall UN 1-8552 



KL 2-3008 

drew J. Eyman. Presiding 
•/-';. raid Ames, Sr. Elton C. I>awless 

■ ■ I ' .\ Axelrod Leland J. Lazarus 

■ t 1 >uly Clarence A. Linn 

• ; I .1. Drewes George E. Maloney 

1 Ml H. Gllckfeld Lawrence S. Mana 

lyton W. Horn I.«nore D. Underwood 

*eiih *:. Kennedy James J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon. Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-3008 

A. C. McChesney. Jury Commlsstoner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

850 Br.vant St. KL 2-300S 

James I.K!ddy, Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
James J. Donohue. Foreman 
Richard L. Swig, Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan, Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

SSO Bryant St. KL 3-9111 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 399 Fremont St. 
Adolph L. Plerotti. 240 TTpland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 



375 Woodside Ave 



JUVENILE JUSTICE COMMISSION 

Meets 2nd Thursday of month; 1:00 P.M. 

375 Woodside Avenue 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 79 New Montgomery St. 
Reverend Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
Reverend John A. Collins. 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Reverend James B. Flynn. 1825 Mission St. 
Miss Myra R. Green, 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Mrs. Horace A. Guittard, 3871 Jackson St. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
William M. Ueedy, 55 Fillmore St. 
Mrs. Mathew O. Tobriner. 3494 Jackson St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 



LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 

El Mirador Hotel. Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 



Harold L. Zellerbach. President, 1 Bush St. 
Bernard C. Begley M.D., 450 Sutter St. 
Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vallejo St. 
Joseph Esherick, 2065 Powell St. 
Mark Harris, 1600 Holloway 
John K. Hagoplan. 220 Bush St. 
Betty Jackson. 2835 Vallejo St. 
William E. Knuth. 1600 Holloway Ave. 
Burton L. Rockwell, 50 Green St. 
Nell Sinton, 1020 Francisco St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace I..egion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President. Public Llbrar>- Commission 
President. Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Executive Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

1011 Uirkin St. UK 1-2 

-Meets every Thursday at 2:30 P.M. 

Ixiuls Mark Cole. President, 1968 Vallejo St. 
Alvln H. Baum. Jr., 2009 Green St. 
James S. Kearney, 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Mein. 315 Montgomery St. 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James U. McCarthy. Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller, Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall II K 1-2 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Hubert J. Sober, President, 165 Montgomery St. I 
Richard C. Ham, 200 Bush St. i 

Wm. Kilpatrlck. 827 Hyde St. 

George J. Grubb. Geiieial Manager, Personnel 



EDUCATION. BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-t 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P..M. 
no Fell St. 



Edward Kemmitt. President, 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Ijawrence Draper. Jr., 10 Walnut St. 
Samuel A. Ladar, 111 Sutter St. 
Mrs. Edward Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore, Jr., 351 California St. 
James E. Straiten, 800 Presidio Ave. 
Adolfo de Urioste. 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears. Supt. of Schools and Secty 



Philip Dindia. President. 536 Bryant St. 

Or. Peter Angel. 1S67 - 15th Ave. 

Charles R. Greenstone. 182 Second St. 

William F. Murray. Chief of Departme 
Albert E. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fir 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Meets 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Frank J. ColIins.President, 2014 - lOth Av, 
George W. Cuniffe. 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell. M.D.. 977 Valencia Si 
Donald J. McCook, 220 Montgomery St. 
Thomas W. McOrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

Lyie J. O'Connell, Executive Director 



Ex-Officio Members 
Chairman, Finance Committee, Board of 

Supervisors 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Josepli P. Mazzola. Chairman. 1021 Market St. 
John E. Gurich. 300 Montgomery St. 
Solomon E. Johnson. 704 Market St. 
•r KoTiK l.ie. 715 Sacraniento St. 
iMelvin M. Swig, Fairmont Hotel 

John W. Beard. Elxecutive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. Ill': 

Meets every Thursday, 4 P.M. 



David Thomson, Chairman. 66 Berry St. 

Arthur S. Becker. 3476 California St. 

iHinnkl Magnln. 7" O'Farrell St. 

G. Baitzer Peterson. 2910 Vallejo St. 

John v.. Sullivan. 69 West Portal Ave. 
Vlnlng T. Fisher. Director 
Thomas J. O'Toole, Secretary 



THE RECO 



RMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 



llllnni II. H. Havls, I'reslilent. iisi Kols 
, Alli'ii Khrluirdt. 2 San lUfael Way 
OrK.- H. i:illin. 4091 - V.nh Ave. 
[•k l!icinl:ni. :i:'0 Crar.v 
. Tims. W S. \Vu, Vi.-o Pns . 1111 S 
J. Kdwln lliitlM, Kxfiutivi' St'i-ri-tai 



ILICE COMMISSION 

S50 Hivmit sti-cft Kl, :i-; 

Mods cvciy .Mimdny .-U ri;liO I'.M. 

irold H. McKinnon. rresideilt. 2r.r. Ciilifornla St 

ul A. Hlsslnger. 415 Snnsomc St. 

n Ka/.a.kerley. S51 Howard St. 
Ttuiinas J. Cahlll, Chlet of Police 
Alfrid J. Neldor. Deputy Chlof of Pollco 
Capt. rorneliu.s P. Murphy, Chief of In.>ipcitoi 
I, Thomas Zarapoza, Director of Traffic 
Capt. John T. Butler, Department Secretary 
I.t. William J. O'Hrlen. Commission Sccretar^ 



IBLIC LIBRARY COMIVIISSION 
Civic Center IIK 1-2121 

Meets 1st Tuesday of month at .■!::10 P .M. 

»n M. Bransten, President. 665 - .Ird St, 

Morris <^ox. Mills Tower 

se M. Fanucchi, 1445 Stockton St. 

irtlmer Kleishhacker .Ir., 601 Califoinia St. 

ircaret V, Oirrtner. SISO Fnlton St. 

ward E. Heavey, 68 Post St. 

Hon K. I,epetich, 1655 Polk Street 

s. ,1. Henry Mohr, 2 Castennda Ave, 

V. William Turner, 1642 Brodcrlck St. 

omas W. S. Wu, D.D.S., 1111 Stockton St. 

William U. Holman, Librarian 

Frank A, Clarvoe, Jr., Secretary 



IBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 
287 City Hall 
Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

lart N. Greenbers, President. 765 1 
rt Simon, 1350 Folsom St. 
orge F. Hansen, 215 Market St. 
omas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 
Dmas F. Stack, 70,1 Market St. 



Bureaus and Departments 
iounts, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

George Negri, Director 
port, San Francisco International, S. F. 28 

Belford Brown, Manager 761-0800 

tch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

Oral L,. Moore, Uen. Mgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 

and Utilities ICngineering Bureau 
nicipal Railway, a4a Presidio Ave. Fl 6-5656 

Vernon W. Anderson, General Manager 
■sonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave, Fl 6-5656 

Paul J. Fanning, Director 
t)lic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

\\'iniuni J. Simons, Director 
Iter Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H, Turner. General Manager 



BLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
585 Bush St. 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday eacl 
at 8:30 A.M. 



lliam P. Scott, Jr., President, 249 Natoma St. 
Xavier Barrios, 2325 Ocean Ave. 

I Ulumenthal, 682 Mission St. 

s. JIargaret K. Murray, 8 L*cksley Drive 

1. Jacqueline Smith, 557 - 10th Ave. 
Ronald H. Born. Director of Public Welfare 
Mrs. Eulala Smith, Secretary to Commission 



CREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 
McLaren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4S66 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdajs each month 
at 3 P.M. 



Iter A. Haas. Sr., President, 98 Battel 
er Bercut, 1333 Jones St. 
ry Margaret Casey, 632 Mission St. 
lliam .M. Coffnian. 525 Market St. 
in F. Conway. Jr.. 3600 Third St. 
Francis J. Men. 450 Sutter St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 2000 Washinglo 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 
525 Golden Gale Ave. 
Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 



erett Griffin. Chairman, 465 California St. 
nes 1! Black, Jr.. 1 Bush St. 
ncs A. Folger, HI, 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan, 835 Market St. 
Uiwrcnce R. Palados, 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman, Executive Director 
M. C. Hermann, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

450 McAllister St. HK 1-21! 

Meets every Wednesday at 2 P.M. 

11. s M, ll:niill1. President, 120 Montgomery St. 

n. : \1 I ■litii... :■.:;;! MontKonicry St. 
lii. I \ 1 'I. JL'.'.l - a5th Ave. 
III.,!., r l:, , (1. 2151 - l.sih Ave. 
Ilia 1. W cjiniuth, 1109 I'acheco 



Ex-Officio Member 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Maltrocce, Secretary 



WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 
Veterans Building 
Meets 2nd Thursday e:icli month al :; 

Iph .1. .\. Slern, Prcsid.nt. l:!4 Hriinnan 
l;, n. i' i:. iiiiill, 225 Bush St. 

111]. .-' I : , ::4:i Sansome 

III. ... i.i^rioli, 300 Montgomery St, 

.1 L. I I . . I., Ill Sult.T St. 



imuel D. Sayad. 35 Aptos Ave. 

Edward Sharkey, Managing Director 

K. L«iwrence George, Executive Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building 1 1 1': 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

yniond L,. Bozzini, Commissioner 
rmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 
Frank J. O'Connell, Market Master Ml 7-;n2:; 

CORONER 

850 Bryant St. KL 3-16:i4 

Dr. Henry W. Turktl 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-8000. Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS. DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott, Director 

County Clerk-Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin Mongan. 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 15S City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

John J. Riordan, 150 Otis 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building U.\ 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox, Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health lor 

Hospital Services 
ssler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-1033 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

Louis A. Moran. Superintendent MO 4-15S0 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. E. Albers. SupeniUendcnt MI 8-S200 

lergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Earl Blake, Adm. Superintendent HE 1-2S0O 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 

R. Brooks Larter. 

Assistant Director, Administrative 
Myron Tatarian 
Asst. Director, Maintenance and <")r)erations 



Bureaus 
Accounts, 260 City Hall HE 1 

J. J. McCIoskey. Supervisor 
Architecture 265 CItv Hall HE 1 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 450 McAllister St. HE 1 

I'.ol.ert c. 1-evy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army III: 1 

A. H. Ekenberg, Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau. 450 McAllister St. HK 1 

Sidney Franklin. Supervisor 
Egineering, 369 City Hall HE 1 

Clifford J. Geerlz, CItv Engineer 
Sewer Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army 

W:ilter l:. .Juiits, Superintendent HE 1 

Street Cleaning, :;:;-:! Annv St. HE 1 

ll.iiianl .\1, i'r.,uy. Siip.rintendent 
Street Repair, 232:1 Army St. HE 1 

iMcFadden, Acting Superintendent 



2121 
2121 



Urban Renewal, 450 McAlli! 

Bernard A. Cummings. Analyst 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hail | 

Ben Benas, Purchaser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway, Chief A.ssistant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, SOO Quint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Ilarrisa 

J. E. Lcary. Supervi.sor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 50 

George Stanley. Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 McAllister St. 
I'hilip Ij. Kezos, Director of Property 
.lames T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr! 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS i MEASURES 

6 City Hall I 

I). C. Skinner. Jr. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



2121 
HE 1-2121 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park p.a l-5lno 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Uncoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday, Jan., April, June, Oct. 
3::i0 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. Honorary President, 

2 Pine St. 
Mrs. Alexander Albert, 2320 Lyon St. 
!•:. K.i\niond Armsby, 2363 L,arkin St. 
Ivjuis A. Benoist, 37 Drumm St. 
loseph M. Bransten, 665 - 3rd St. 
Walter E. Buck, 235 Montgomery St. 
Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hvde St. 
.Mrs. Bruce Kelham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 
i_-harles Mayer, San Francisco Examiner 
Pavid Pleydell-Bouveric, Glen Ellen, Calif. 
Airs. Henry Potter Russell. 1420 Montgomery St. 
John N. Rosekrans, 333 Montgomery St. 
William R. Wallace. 100 Bush St. 
Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L,. Zellerbach. 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 
President, Recreation & Park Commission 

Thomas Carr Howe, Jr., Director 

Capt. David J. Walsh, Secretary 

M, H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan.. .\pril. .June. Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 
Board of Trustees 

Mrs. George Cameron, Honorary President. 

Hillsborough 
Avery Brundage, Honorary Trustee 
Miss Louise A. Boyd, 210 Post St. 
Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 
R. Gwin FoIIis, 3690 Washington St. 
Clifford V. Heimbucher, 220 Bush St. 
is Hotel 



Garrett -AL 
Roscoe 1.' I 
Charles I 
Mrs. Will 
Joseph t.' 



444 Caiifor 



I'iloli, San Mateo Co. 



St. 



ker, iiurlingame Country Club 
Michel D. Weill. 126 Post 

Charles de Young Thieriot. 1802 Floribunda, Hills- 
borough 

Ex-Offlcio Members 
Mayor 

President, Recreation & Park Commission 
Richard Rheem, Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Alacalpine, Executive Secretary 



Robert J. Ev 



PUBLIC POUND 
2.'.00 - 16th St. 
;harles W. Friedrlchs, 



ME -JULY, 1963 



WOLDEN 

( Continued from Page 4 I 
which would shift the tax burden 
of n given group to the ordinary 
taxpayer." the aide said. 

This year, the aide said, Wolden 
was instrumental in blocking a bill 
which would have permitted a tax 
exemption on the inventories of 
coffee companies here. 

Among Wolden's innovations in 
the office, the aide said, was his 
system of giving a closer look to 
out-of-state firms which have of- 
fices in San Francisco. Each year, 
the city now send.s auditors to the 
East, Midwest, and South to ex- 
amine the books of those com- 
panies. 

For a yearly outlay of some 
$40,000. the city gets additional 
taxes of $1 million in this manner, 
the aide said. This innovation has 
been copied by many counties 
across the country. 

Wolden — who holds the longest 
tenure of any elected city official 

often tells the 140 employees of 



his office that "we are working for 
the people — they are the boss," 
the aide .said. 

"People don't come in hei'e and 
get the impression that they're 
invariably wrong and we're in- 
variably right," the aide said. "We 
give them attention, and a fair 
hearing, and a courteous one. 

"Nobody who comes in hero is 
faced with an arrogant attitude, 
like in .some tax agencies." the 
aide said. 

In his 25 years in office, Wolden 
has kept things on an even keel 
despite a depre.ssion, a war, and 
the post-war boom in property and 
land values, the aide said. 

Wolden, 53, was given a party 
by his employees on June 27, in 
honor of his service to the city. 
The employees chipped in to pre- 
sent him with a plaque that read: 

"We proudly take this oppor- 
tunity to express our esteem and 
affection for your inspired leader- 
ship and the warm association we 
have enjoyed with you through the 
years." 



PETER PELLFTIER and 

M.^\L'EL MENENDEZ 

SUPERIOR PLUMBING and 
HARDWARE 

3 526 SACRAMENTO STREET 
WEst 1-1266 



Miraloma Pharmacy 

Let u^ hll y.nr next prcscrirti"" 

Free pick up and delivery 
6? Portol.i Drive LO 6-1 100 



C&MMEATCO. 

Wholesale Jobbers 

Phones: A.S 3-3460 — AS 3-8747 

2842 San Pablo Ave 

BERKELEY 

A-1 Glen Hunter Moving 

EXPRESS a: TRANSFER 

.Statt'-Wide Ser\'ice 

mo ORTEGA STREET 

MO 1-2644 LO 6-4300 



RUTH GRAY JOHNSON 

Graduate Masseuse 

S.F. City Permit 
30 Years' Experience 

2421 Clement St. SK 2-0243 



TOWER TV 



Radio i' TV S.,U-v y .Servic 

729 PORTOLA DRIVE 

MO 1-1350 



AETNA ROOF 

SERVICE & 

TILE CO. 

DON MEADOWS 

20 Years' Bonded Roofing 
iO Yean' Experience 

Commercial— Industrial 
Residential 

231 El Caniino Real, Colnia 
PL 5-0733 



Nate's Fender-Unbender 

Complete Auto Body Repairs 

Auto Painting 

260 CLEMENTINA STREET 

DO 2-3340 or EX 7-5827 



CHANCES R 

"I'ou'll Have a Good Time a 

"Baby Doll's Piano Bar" 

301 Turk ac Leavenworth 

TU 5-2635 



Fuller Paint— DuPom Paint 

SCOn'S HARDWARE 

El) HERMANY 
Homcwares— Builders Hardware 
2501 IRVING (Cor. 26th Ave.) 

Phone SE 1-114') 



H & R TRANSMISSION 
SERVICE 

BOB SMITH 

We Give New Life K. Your C:ai 

764 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

TU 5-5025 



Alta Luinu Home 
For Elderly People 

Excellent Food - TV 

Reasonable Rales 

2641 Fulton St. SK 2-7470 



GEORGE ERKSON 
Chevron Station 

4801 MISSION STREET 
JU 4-5400 



Tops Interior Decorating 

Modern Interiors 

Custom Vplwlslering 

See MR. MARIO 

2800 Bryant St. Mission 8-5777 



PARK HOTEL 

Clean ■ Reasonable Rates 
1040 FOLSOM ST. 

UN 1-9397 



FILLMORE 8C ELLIS 

KEY SHOP 

Locksmith - Auto & House Keys 
1580 Ellis St. FI 6-3817 



Hunt's Quality Donuts 

Main Branch: 2400 Mission Street 

Mission 7-9931 - San Francisco 

Other locations East Bay 
and Peninsula 



DEAK & CO. 
Foreign Exchange 

349 SUTTER STREET 
DO 2-3452 



G&Z Auto Upholstery 

KARL I', 21PF 

Seal Covers - Cushions - Carpets 

Tops ■ Boat Upholstery 

Fully Insured 

2707 Gciry Boulevard JOrdan 7-2646 

San Franciseo 

lOEAL SEWING MACHINE CO. 



PICKWICK 
Motor Hotel 

0. C. CAMPBELL, Mgr. 
5th & Mission Sts. 

San Fral 



GA 1-7500 

Free Overnight Parking 

Bus to Ball Park at Front Door 
Visit Our 

BYLINE 

Cocktail Lounge 



George E. Chase 
& Associates 

114 SANSOME STREET 
GA 1-1277 



EXCEL TRUCKING CO. 

165 GREENWICH ST. 

EX 2-7389 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Sinaloa Mexican Canliiii 
Restaurant 

Continuous Entertainment 
1416 Powell St. SU 1-962 

THE BRAYTON ARMS 

Hotel Apartments 

50 Turk Street PR 6-156 

GARQA & CO. 

ORNAMENTAL 

IRON WORKS 

1438 Egbert St. JU 7-553 



Tlie Lowrie Paving Co., Inc. 

J. F. Lowrie, President — James W. Lowrie, Vice-President 

San Francisco Yard: 2170 Oakdale Ave., San Francisco 24, Calif. 

R. J. Kilroy, Superintendent 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Gradinsj — P;iving Underground Cunstruction 

Main Office and Yard: Lowrie Avenue, South San Francisco, Calif. 

(415) PO 1-2265 (415) JU 3-3574 



I WHIT HENRY 

(Continued from Page 5) 
light possibly increase the reve- 
ue tluit is so sorely needed. 



Each year, from May 1 to Oc- 
)ber 31. all species of California 
lussels are under quarantine as 
nflt for human consumption. The 
tate Board of Public Health ha.s 
jtablishcd the quarantine to ex- 
ind along the entire coa.st of Cali- 
irnia. a.s well as all bays, inlets 
id harbors, including San Fran- 
sco Bay. The purpose of this an- 
ial quarantine is to protect the 
iople of California from the high- 

to.xic poison found in the shell- 
ih during this time of the year. 
lussels may be used for bait, but 
list be broken open and placed in 
mtainers plainly labeled "Mussels 
ay contain poison. Unfit for hu- 
an food." During this quarantine 
iriod. the dark meat of clams can 
so be dangerous. Only the white 
Bat should be eaten; and the 
ims should be thoroughly cleaned 
id washed before cooking. In dig- 
ng clams, they should be taken 
ly from areas free of sewage 
ntamination. 
The source of mussel poisoning 

Gonyaula.x catenella, a micro- 
jpic organism found in plankton, 
lich serves as food for mussels 



and clams. In warm weather the 
organism may multiply to such an 
extent that the water is a deep rust 
red color. While the poison does not 
appear to be harmful to the mus- 
sel, it can prove fatal to man when 
he consumes the toxic shellfish. A 
prickly feeling in the lips, tongue 
and finger tips, followed by numb- 
ness are the first signs of poison- 
ing. An unsteady gait and other 
lack of muscular coordination and 
finally ascending paralysis mark 
the progress of the poisoning, with 
death from respiratory failure in 
two to twelve hours after consinrip- 
tion of the shellfish. Chemically, the 
poison is similar to strychnine, and 
is one of the strongest poisons 
known. Because it is heat stable, 
cooking by boiling or steaming 
does NOT destroy the poison. In 
fact, death has been known to oc- 
cur 15 minutes after eating toxic 
mussels. 

As the toxic shellfish cannot be 
distinguished in appearance from 
the harmless ones, the only safe 
rule to follow is: AVOID EATING 
MUSSELS OR CLAMS FROM 
CALIFORNIA COASTAL WA- 
TERS FROM NOW UNTIL OC- 
TOBER 31. 

(Continued on Page 13) 



TOUIOUSE 
FRENCH lAUNDRY 

Laundry & Cleaning 

821 Lincoln Way 
MO 4-1634 



Aliren''s Bakery 

Coffee House - Bakery Products 
1946 VAN NESS AVENUE 



BARTZ SALES & SERVICE 

Since 19J0 

Electrolux, Hoover and all other makes 

Repairing a Spci^ilty 

1906 Polk Street ORdway 3-1832 



TAD'S STEAKS 

injoy a Quality Steak. Reasonably 
Priced 

TAD'S STEAKS $1.19 

Including Salad, Baked Potato, 
French Bread and Butter 

Quickly Served 

in a Pleasant Atmosphere 

Imitated but Never Equalled 

at the Price 

120 Powell St. 
San Francisco 



^E-JULY, 1963 



NEDA'S FLOWER & GIFT SHOP 

1681 HAIGHT STREET 
KL 2.2020 



Stella Pastries 

446 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
VU 6-2914 



Hotel Golden Gate 

Clcnn - Rcasc.nahlc R.ilos 

549 KEARNY STREET 

DO 2.057S 



Hammer's Auto Repair 

Complete Service 

2941 GEARY BLVD. 

SK 1.7860 



Trader Henry's 
Vesuvio Cafe 



MIKE & JIM'S 
GARAGE 

Complete Automotive Service 

Automatic Transmission 
Specialty 

City Towing Service 

3950 - 24th Street 

VAIencia 6-1886 



Automatic Home 
Laundry Service 

For Service Call YU 2-0634 
60 CLARA STREET 



COLMA GOLF RANGE 

Lessons by LARRY MONTES, 

Golf Pro 

PL 5-8140 

3405 Junipero Serra Blvd., Colma 



VICTORIA CAFE 

BEST FOOD— RIGHT PRICE 
154 McAllister HE 1-0833 



A-1 DELICATESSEN 

MA 1-7371 

1430 HAIGHT ST. 

San Francisco 



Tel. UN 1-4411 



: Ho 



CIVIC CENTER CLEANERS 
AND LAUNDRY 

Kriil nickiiic I Mir .'^lu-.i.-ill v 

Ladies' and Gents' Alterations 

.n-.VI-; THu.MP.m i.x. (iw.ur 

61 McAllister St., San Francisco 2 



Baylacq French Laundry 

Reliable Laundry Service 
116 CLEMENT STREET 

SK 1-0971 



ELECTRONIC TRAINING LABORATORY 

Electronics - TV-Color 
Communications 

Residence Trade School Approved 
for Veterans 

4111 Broadway OL 8-1 114 



(Insist on the Best) 

SUPERIOR 
ORIVING SCHOOL 

llcini; a Superior Driver is the 
Best Insurance you can buy! 

1322 NORIEGA ST. 
LO 6-6800 



George Scharet^ & Sons 
DRAYMEN 

904 - 22nd St. MI 7-4932 

SAN FRANCISCO 7 

MAHEUCCI BROS. 
York Meat Market 

CHOICE MEATS, 
POULTRY, FISH and EGGS 

2794 - 24th STREET 
VA 4-5419 



DICK CHIN 



Real Estate and Itisurance 
Specializing in 

NORTH BEACH 8C 
CHINATOWN PROPERTY 

813 Clay Street EX 7-3255 

San Francisco 



Cordova Hotel 

521 Post St. OR 3-4321 

and 

Beresford Hotel 

635 Sutter St. OR 3-9900 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Modern-Reasonable Rales 



527 CLUB 

527 BRYANT STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



G & B GARAGE 

OV 1-9282 

1271 - 48th Avenue 
San Francisco 



Kuchel Fights For 
Coastal Shipping 




THOMAS H. KUCHEL 
U. S. Senator 

According to a telegram received 
by G. L. Fox, executive vice presi- 
dent of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, from Senator Thom- 
as H. Kuchel, the Senate commerce 
committee has rejected proposed 
legislation which would have per- 
mitted a vessel built in a foreign 
shipyard to compete in the han- 
dling of domestic water-borne com- 
merce, particularly between Seattle 
and points in Alaska. 

Laws of the United States have 
required that domestic water-borne 
commerce be handled by American 
flag vessels built in American ship- 
yards and this has been important 
to the American merchant marine. 
Fox said. 

Legislation has recently been in- 
troduced in Congress whereby 
amendment of the federal law was 
proposed to permit a Japanese- 
built train fen-y to be used in the 
Alaska service. 

"The San Francisco Chamber 
contends this would have been det- 
rimental to the welfare of the 
American merchant marine and 
commends Senator Kuche! for his 
work in regard to the proposed 
legislation," Fox stated. 



Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Est.iblishcd 1894 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 

E.vccutivc Office and Engineering Department 

1 12 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, California 

Fotenos Bros. Meat Co. 

Since 1909 

WHOLESALE MEATS 

UNderhill 1-4226 1220 Howard Street 

S.AN FRANCISCO 



Italiaii-Aiiierican Social Club 

Catering 

WEDDING BANQUET DINNERS 

Telephone: )V 4-9918 

24 Russia Avenue San Francisco, Calif. 

Borden Priiitinpj Co., Inc. 

Color Prinling-Direcl Mail-Calalogi-Commercial Formi 

Adyertising Typography— Lithography 

Phone: GA 1-2320 

WALTER A. PETERSON, Executive Vice President 

329 Minna Street San Francisco 

CASTANOLA Fine Sea Food Restaurant 

Andrew B. Castagnola PRospect 6-5015 San Francisco 11 

FOOT OF JONES STREET - FISHERMAN'S WHARF 

CRAB STAND - PRospect 5-1040 

EVERGREEN MORTUARY 

No Finer Edifice for the Final Tribute 

McAVOY, O'HARA CO. 

Establiihed 1850 

SK 1-0077 4545 Geary Blvd. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Westlake Insurance Agency 

All Forms of Insurance 

36 PARK PLAZA DRIVE - DALY CITY 

WALTER F. BRODIE, Manager 

Telephone: PLaza 5-7113 Residence Phone: MOntrose 4-5188 



"THE TERMITE MAN" 

State Licenced 

/ 5 Years Experience 

INSPECTION - REPORTS 

ESTIMATES - REPAIRS 

Termites - Dry Rot 
Beetles 



"THE EXTERMINATOR" 

SPECIALISTS IN 
EFFECTIVE TREATMENTS 

OF 
Rats - Mice - Insects 



7 DAYS A WEEK 
7 a.m. +o 9 p.m. 

UN 12328 

The 
Halperin Company 

4042 20th Sf., San Francisco 



Colden Gate 
Hospital 

1065 SUTTER ST. 

OR. 3-2600 
SAN FRANCISCO 



ACE METALS CO. 

TOP PRICES FOR 

Copper — Brass — Lead 

Auto Generators 8C Starters 

1420 FAIRFAX VA 6-4545 



KOTZBECK GALLERIES 

Fine Prints - Expert Framing 

OriK.nals in Water Colors 

and Oils 

2031 Fillmore St. FI 6-5620 



CUNEO BAKING CO. 

523 GREEN ST. 

EX 2-4969 

San Francisco 



American Elevator Co. 

24-Hour Service 

1354 FAIRFAX AVE. 

MI 7-3822 



ANDY'S DONUTS 

FRESH DONUTS DAILY 

Open 24 Hours 

460 Castro St. MA 1-9122 



TRICOLOR 
FRENCH RESTAURANT 

Dinner after 4 P.M. - Closed Mon 
4233 Geary Blvd. BA 1-8707 



Clyde E. Bentley 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

405 Sansome St. GA 1-1042 

San Francisco 



RANCHO FIESTA 

MEXICAN CUISINE 
Open Fri. a: Sat. till 4 A.M. 
AK.)— Orders lo Take Out 
1650 Valencia at Mission 
MI --')'> 54 or MI ~-8"78 



ROOSEVELT CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CY WEIT2 

New Homes — Apartments 

Carpentry — Remodeling 

a: Repairs 

102 Hamilton St. JU 7-4273 



I WHIT HENRY 

' (Contimieci from Page 111 

With Slimmer now well under 
my. many of iis are giving some 
hought to vacations and places to 
isit in the months ahead. One 
lace of real interest, according to 
he National Automobile Club, is 
he Oregon Caves National Monu- 
lent in southern Oregon. 

On an August day in 1874 Elijah 
)avidson was out after bear in the 
liskiyou Mountains of southern 
)regon. After some beating around 
1 the bush he managed to spot a 
ear and wounded it. The wounded 
ear, however, disappeared into an 
pening in the rocks and Elijah, 
rmed with a torch and his rifle, 
allowed after it. He thus became 
he first white man to happen 
cross the natural wonder that has 
ince come to be known as the Ore- 
on Caves. 

The story of these vast caves is 
ne that starts far back in the 
ges. It starts back at a time when 
ome ancient ocean that then cov- 
red the land was depositing great 
lyers of lime, which later hard- 
ned into limestone. Under terrific 
.eat and pressiu'e generated within 
he earth this limestone was turned 
D marble and the whole area was 
hrust up above the surface of the 
ea and formed into what is now 



known as the Siskiyou Mountains. 
Rain fell and mi.\ed with decaying 
vegetation to form carbonic and 
other acids, and this acid ran 
through the fractures foi'med in 
the marble during the period of up- 
heaval to carve out the great tun- 
nels that became the Oregon Caves. 

As the acid water ate away the 
marble in one place it would de- 
posit it in another. As the water 
dripped slowly from the ceiling it 
would evaporate slightly before 
falling and leave some of the lime 
it was carrying as a deposit. And 
as it struck the floor and evapo- 
rated it would deposit more lime 
there. In this way the fantastic 
stalactites and stalagmites were 
formed, hanging icicle - like from 
the ceiling, rising cone-like from 
the floor. Often these stalactites 
and stalagmites would join togeth- 
er to form Strang natural columns 
in the underground caves. 

Today the caves are an as yet 
not completely explored wonder 
filled with strange corridors and 
chambers that have been visited by 
many tourists and have been given 
such names as the Garden of the 
Gods, Paradise Lost, Neptune's 
Grotto, Dante's Inferno, King's 
Palace, and Cathedral Arch. 

Putting Oregon Caves on your 
list of places to visit this sinnmer 
might be well worth your while. 



STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

815 BRYANT ST. at 6th MArlcct 1-3063 

San Francisco 3, California 

Mme. J. G. DUPORT 

MODEL FRENCH LAUNDRY 

1861 UNION STREET 

Phone WEst 1-5984 San Francisco 9, California 

EDGEWATER HOTEL 

Nenest Redecorated Hotel on the Waterfront — Sensational Vierf 

226 EMBARCADERO EXbrook 7-2928 

Reasonable Rates — Cocktail Room 

SOON A FINE NEW RESTAURANT 

Tliomasser & Associates 

1228 Twentieth Avenue 
Lombard 4-0180 



WEINSTEIN CO. 

1041 MARKEI' SI REOT 
YOUR IRIENPI.Y DEPARTMENT STORS 

BRANCHLS: 

100 Market Street 820 Clement Street 

615 Market Street 150 West Portal 

1620 Polk Street 





ims 


Claude Bcrhouct and Cl.mdine Berhouet, Props. 

Hotel de France 




J^*" 


BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL 






780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

Sweetheart Hams and Bacon 
"Idaho Quality Fed Beef" 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



SINCE 1947 

FRANK'S BODY SHOP 

COMPLETE BODY and FENDER REPAIR 

Foreign Car Speci.ilist — Spray Painting 

Free Estimates — All Work Guaranteed 

MONDAY - FRIDAY, 8:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 

MA 1-4300 724 Valencia Street San Francisco 

Sunshine Corner Rest Home 

Good Food — Pleasant Atmosphere 
1521 Masonic Ave. UN 3-4470 

PAUL WHITMARSH 

T&W Enameling Company 

LACQUER and BAKED ENAMEL FINISHES 

To Specification — Satisfaction Guaranteed 

MI 8-1595 1562 BANCROFT 

East of 5700 Block . 3rd Street 



UNE-JULY, 1963 



BAY WINDOW 

(Continued from Page 3) 

..on either is or isn't so, "The only 
thing I'll probably get a unanimous 
vote on is my resignation." Blake 
said resignedly . . . 

Speaking of campaigns, the four 
candidates for the Board of Super- 
visors who will be supported by 
the Volunteers for Better Govern- 
ment constitute an interesting but 
not surprising group: Incumbents 
Clarissa McMahon and Jack Fer- 
don, J. Max Moore who is succeed- 
ing James Leo Halley, and Alan 
Nichols who ran with Volunteers' 
support in 1961 but lost. ... In 
making their selection the Volun- 
teers passed over Supervisoi-s 
Charles A. Ertola and Jo.seph M. 
Casey, both veteran vote-getters 
. . . With six to be .selected, it is 
our hunch the race could feature a 
Garri.son finish between Nichols 
and KPIX publicist Al Baccari . . . 

The Volunteers' support is valu- 
able because the group raises funds 
and provides campaign direction, 
two highly desirable assets which 
the two lads in the Big Arena 
already seem to have: Dobbs with 
Whitaker & Baxter, Shelley with 
Gross & Roberts. . . . The cam- 
paigpn closest to our heart is one 
we'd like to raise a fund of 
$1,000,000 for and employ Herb 
Caen to direct: Get Rid of the 
Pigeons! Talk about population ex- 
plosion is shallow indeed; the real 
threat to San Francisco is the 
pigeon population explosion! Soon 
no one will be safe, and Hitchcock's 
"Birds" will be a bedtime story 
by comparison! . . . 



On a calmer note, a tip of the 
hat to Charlie Ayrcs. new a.ssistanl 
manager of the Chamber of Com- 
merce publicity dept. A veteran of 
every local paper, he'll be working 
with Chamber Publicist Joe Haug- 
hey. . . . Another hat-tip to The 
Chroncile's Art Hoppe, accoladed 
in Newsweek as "the best political 
humorist in the countiy." New.s- 
week's right. . . . And. in closing, 
we'll take off the hat and throw it 
high in the air as a tribute to The 
Examiner's Russ Cone for his ex- 
ceptionall.v perspicacious, penetrat- 
ing — and perturbing - analysis of 
the racial situation in San Fran- 
cisco today. . . . 

P.S. TO BAY WINDOW: The 
following "Florence to Florence" 
note was received by Mrs. George 
H. Allen of the City-County Record 
from Mrs. Florence E. Douglas, 
recently elected the first lady 
Mayor of Vallejo, following last 
month's "Her Honor, The Mayor" 
story in Bay Window: 

"Dear Florence: 

"I read with sui-prise and a great 
deal of pride the fine article in 
OUR City-County Record. It is 
really heart-warming to have you 
do this! I often think of all the 
things we have shared and the fun 
we have had. 

"It is, of course, very rewarding 
to at last be able to do for the 
people of Vallejo many of the 
things I have advocated here. . . . 

"Excu.se the sciibble and haste. 
I do hope we can get together 
shortly. We are in budget sessions 
now and you know what that 
means ! 

"Affectionately . . . 
"Florence" 



John Ostrat Co., Inc. 
ENGRAVING 



CASA LINDA 

Mexican Food at Its Best 

Open 7 days from 1 1 A.M. 

3854 Geary Blvd. SK 2-5972 

WING SUN 
Chinese Funerals 

17 Brcnham Place YU 2-0719 

Lew Nelson's 
MOBIL SERVICE STATION 

3rd ac South Park DO 2-6680 

LOMBARD LIQUORS 
Beer ■ Wines - Liquors 

1418 Lombard St. GR 4-4212 



BELFAST BEVERAGES 

640 Valencia St. 
SAN FRANOSCO 



F. W. JONES 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

PHONES: UN 3-4777 

RESIDENCE: LY 3-5430 

741 Tehama St., San Francisco 3 



Bruce J. Scrievers 

AIRTRONICS 

1338 Mission St. MA 1-4500 

San Francisco ?, Calif. 



The WHITE MOTOR Co. 

5TH &: BRANNAN STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



GEARY MOTORS 

New 1963 Fords 

Hij;lic.st Quality Used Cars 
Lowest Prices 

Lowest Down Payments 
Longest Terms 

4700 GEARY BLVD. 
BA. 1-2300 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 
In.struments for Hand Surgery 
Active H.nnd St Finger Splints 

70 12111 STREET 
MA 1-6876 



CHINATOWN SMOKE SHOP 

727 Washington St. 
EX 2-9525 

Charles J. Grisez Co. 

REALTORS 

Dnvc-In Parking 
2430 Chestnut St. W.-K 1-6688 



OLD JOE'S PLACE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

220 TURK STREET 

Graystone 4-6836 

SAN FRANOSCO 



J. BIZON 



Mcrch.indise — We buy and sell 
Used Furniture and all kinds of 

856 McAllister street 

Phone Day or Night 
Bus. FI 6-6605 Res. MO 4-1809 



White House 
French Laundry 

J. p. CASSOU 
2549 Clay St. WEst 1-8073 



HOUSE OF POOLE 

Exclusive PLice to Dine 

MICHAEL GAGERRO 

New Owner 

30 Kearny St. YV 1-3066 



BRISTOL AGENCY 

Practical Nurses— Bahy Sitters 

24-Hour Telephone Service 

Bonded 6? Licensed by State 

PR 6-9100 641 O'Farrell 



THE HONGKONG 
AND SHANGHAI 

BANKING 

CORPORATION 

OF CALIFORNIA 

A Subsidiary of The Hongkong Banl 
Group which has more thon 140 
offices fhroughout the world . . . 







80 SUTTER STREET 
San Erancisco 

»r Federal Deposit Insur 



Custoni-Aire 
Products 

Division of Pacific Industries, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Forced Air - Gas Fired Heaters 

& Wall Furnaces 

Air Conditioning 

• 

600 Indiana Street 

VA 6-7171 



SACRED HEART 
HIGH SCHOOL 

ENROLL NOW- 
Fall Term Starii Sept. 3, 196} 

1075 ELLIS STREET 
San Francisco, California 



BILL NUTTER'S GARAGE 

specialists on Wheel Alignment 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visitacion Ave, JU, 7-702C 

Bill Barca San Francisco 



THE RECOR 



^LIFORNIA LARGEST U.S 
RODUCER OF CHAMPAGNE 

Nearly a fourth of the Cham- 
gne made in America goes for 
ne weddings, the wine industry 
igazines "Wines & Vines" says 

its annual Champagne issue. 
Editor and Publisher Irving Mar- 
s uncovered the dgiire through a 
irketing survey. 

Last year Americans consumed 
569.239 gallons of Champagne, up 

per cent over the five-year av- 
Bge. Of the total California ^ 
rgest U. S. producer of sparkling 
jies made 1.971,958 gallons. 
In his survey Marcus discovered 
at: 
Two bottles of Champagne out 

every five sold are pink or red, 
1th pink ahead. 
Three bottles of Champagne out 

every five are purchased through 
package store. 

Next to weddings, Christmas is 
.e most popular time for drinking 
Ibbly. New Years ranks only 
lird. Anniversaries of one kind or 
lother are fourth. 
Most Champagne is sold in fifth- 
Be bottles. 

Marcus said he also learned that 
jople have no qualms about ask- 
g donations of the most heavily 
ixed wine on the market. 
'■Judging from the answers re- 
iived, each producer is asked to 
mate Champagne an average of 
18 times a year." he said, "which 
dicates that the bubbly stuff 
ially has an appeal among those 
ho like to get something for 
Jthing." 

Marcus polled 82 firms and got 
ick 26 answers, for what he con- 
uded was a reasonable sample 
f the market. 



PG&E FILES 
$15 MILLION 
REFUND PLAN 

Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany filed a plan to pass on to its 
gas customers a $1^ million rcfimd 
received from El Pa.so Natural Gas 
Company for gas piu'chased by 
PG&E. 

S. L. Sibley, PG&E vice presi- 
dent and geenral manager, said the 
plan, filed with the California Pub- 
lic Utilities Commission, calls for 
a credit to be made on customers' 
gas bills in the majority of cases. 
The plan requires CPUC approval 

For all but large users, the 
credits will probably appear on 
August bills and will be based on 
gas consumption during February 
through May of this year. They 
will amount to an estimated $4 to 
$5 on the typical household gas 
bill, Sibley said. 

PG&E has more than 1.8 million 
natural gas customers in 33 of Cal- 
ifornia's 58 counties. El Paso Nat- 
ural aGs Company has supplied 
about 70 per cent of the gas sold 
by PG&E for nearly a decade. 

PG&E has led a long fight for 
lower rates for gas it purchases 
from El Paso in a series of pro- 
ceedings before the Federal Power 
Commission and the U. S. Court of 
Appeals. 

Last October the FPC ordered 
El Paso to reduce its rates and 
make refunds. PG&E passed on the 
rate reduction to its customers, and 
on May 20 it received the $15 mil- 
lion refund, covering El Paso gas 
prices from April 15, 1955, through 
December 31, 1957. 



Bell's Jewelers 

Hatch- Clock & Jcnelry Repm 
Watch Bands 

Longines — Bulova 

715 IRVING STREET 

MO 1-1080 

SAN FRANCISCO 



THE IRON POT 

Lunch - Dinners 

6J9 MONTGOMERY 

EX 2-2100 

San Fr.Tncisco 



ROYAL BAKING CO. 

4773 MISSION STREET 

JU 5-9655 

SAN FRANOSCO 



Garnero's Grocerteria 

FINEST OF GROCERIES 

"At the Right Price" 
544 Excelsior Ave. JU. 4-9993 

At Cor. Naples San Francisco 12 



UNIVERSAL MERCHANDISE CO. 

Gifts • Bazaar Supplies - Toys 
at Wholesale Prices 

744 Mission St., near 3rd St. 

EXbrook 7-5413 

SAN FRANCISCO 



RUSSELL NEWCOMB 

Creator of Original Designs for 

Artificial Foliage and Flowers 

190 FIFTH ST. 

San Francisco 3 YU. 6-5385 



LEARN TO SWIM THIS SUMMER 

Have a SAFER — More Enjoyable — Time 

• Register now for class sessions 

• Small individuolized groups 

• Private instruction by oppointment 

CHILDREN OR ADULTS 

Lylc Collet & Staff 

BERT'S SWIM SCHOOL 

609 Sutter St., Marines Memorial Building TU 5-2918 

"Mulhollaiid's ' J & B MOTORS 

Quality Used Cars 

1645 VALENCIA STREET 

Phone Mission 7-1645 San Francisco 10, California 

JIM MULHOLLAND 

CROWN DRUG CO. 

Pesricplion Specialists 

PL 5-8200 355 South Mayfair Ave. 

DALY CITY 

COLAN HEATING 8. SHEET METAL CO. 

Air Conditioning 

GUTTERS - DRAIN PIPES - CHIMNEYS - SKYLIGHTS 

GARBAGE CANS 

22 Patterson Street Phone ATwater 2-2616 



HAVISIDE CO. 

Derrick Barges 

40 SPEAR ST. 

EX. 2-0064 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BANK of CANTON 

555 MONTGOMERY ST. 

GA. 1-4886 
743 WASHINGTON ST. 

GA. 1-5215 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Bentley Engineers 

405 SANSOME ST. 

GA. 1-1042 

San Francisco, California 



ROBERT E. BOULWARE 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

Residential and Commercial 

1143 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

JO. 7-2211 



BARNON 

COMANY 

AUTOMATIC CAR WASH 

2150 LOMBARD ST. 
(betwn. Fillmore and Steiner) 



GOLDENRATH*S 
PENTHOUSE 

Bufieteria 

at H. LIEBES & CO. 

BREAKFAST-LUNCH-DINNER 

ON SHOPPING NITES 

GRANT AVE. at GEARY 

GA. 1-6240 



RUDY'S 

PAINT & BODY SHOP 

Finest Painting - Expert Work 

Call RUDY, JO. 7-4396 

1125 STEINER ST. 



UNE-JULY, 1963 



i 



FUB. LIBFL-mY PERIODICAL ROOU 

Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, Calif. 

52 X-1/59 (3077) 3630 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Snn Francisco, Calif. 
Pennit No. 4507 



^<n a uee4A cUtUti^ cxfrence^tce. 




Located at 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 









CLUB CATERING CO. 






^« '■''JI^ctP^ 




Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 




CLAREXCE X. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 

rruilv.ilc Ch.ipel 

nso FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIlog 3-4114 




Food Services 

1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. Diamond 2-6361 

BURLINGAME, California 




SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 







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HETCH HETCHY PROJECT 






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AROUND & ABOUT 






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By WHIT HENRY 

BAY WINDOW 










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HAROLD DOBBS— 






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F^ 


A PROFILE 






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ORAL 


L. 


MOORE, Gen.-Manager, Hetch Hetchy Projec 



SEPTEMBER - OCTOBER, 1963 



S. F. Firemen Deserve 
YES Vote on "Prop. F" 

For the first time in years, the pay of Police and Firemen is 
different. San Francisco, as well as every other City In California, 
has always paid its police and firemen the same. However, through a 
quirk in the wording of the Charter when it was changed in 1952 
by the San Francisco voters establishing a pay formula regulated 
by the Board of Supervisors and based on cities of 100,000 or more 
population in the State, the door was left open for a pay differential 
between police and firemen. 

The neighboring City of Berkeley voted this year to pay its 
policemen $16.00 more a month than its firemen. The Board of Super- 
visors, because of Charter language, granted the same pay differential 
in San Fiancisco to policemen over firemen. Proposition F, which has 
been unanimously approved by the Board of Supervisors and submitted 
to the votei-s, will correct this inequity in pay and so change the 
Charter that this may never occur again. 

Super\isors Favor Parity for Police and Fire 

The Board of Supervisors have always maintained parity between 
the Police and Fire Depaitments in pay. When the differential occurred 
in July they took immediate steps to correct this inequity and have 
submitted a Charter amendment with their unanimous approval to 
the voters in November. 

San Francisco Fire Insurance Rates Lowest in State 

The San Francisco Fire Department's rate of pay is based on the 
salaries paid in any city in the State over 100,000 population. Yet. the 
efficiency of the San Francisco Department by the Insurance Com- 
panies is the best as witnessed by the chart of insurance rates in 
these 13 Cities. 

Anaheim $1.30 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Torrance $1.30 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Fresno $1.20 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Sacramento $1.20 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Berkeley $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Glendale $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Long Beach $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Los Angeles $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Oakland $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Pasadena $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

Santa Ana $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

San Diego $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

San Jose $1.10 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

SAN FRANCISCO $1-00 per $1,000 Fire Insurance 

KEEP THE MORALE OF FIRE SERVICE HIGH 

The morale of the San Franci.sco Fire Department has never been 
higher. To downgi-ade the Fire Department could seriously impair 
this high morale. Examinations, risks, hazards and retirement benefits 
of the Police and Fire Departments are essentially the same, why 
should morale be impaired by the establishment of an inequity in pay ? 
RECRUITMENT 

One of the biggest reasons why police have been granted higher 
pay than firemen has been labeled as a recruitment problem. Statistics 
show that in recent years there have been a few more entrance 
examinations for policemen. However, the present situation may create 
the same predicament in the fire department, because downgrading 
the fire department salary-wise would eventually result in down- 
grading the protection and service received by the people of San 
Francisco as a result of the recruitment of inferior personnel. 

Promotional Opportunities 

The city in California that brought about the differential in pay 
between the two departments stated that promotional opportunities 
in the fire department were greater than in the police department, 
therefore the police should be given higher salaries. In San Francisco 
a .study was made to determine how this situation stacked up and it 
was found that the promotional opportunities in the police department 
are 27'/f whereas those of the fire department are 27.9'a this bare 
difference hardly constitutes a difference in opportunity. 



The neiu 
reffiigErator- 
ffrEEzers hold 

anything 



except frost 
—"V 




NO MORE DEFROSTING. That's the story on the new frostless 
refrigerator-freezers. And they hold up to 50 per cent more 
food — yet take no more kitchen space than refrigerators often 
years ago. That's because the walls are thinner, the insulation 
better, the design more modern. You'll find a wide choice of 
decorator colors, too. See 
your Reddy Recommended _J-» ^_y?jy'ili 

Facijlc Gai and EUttne Cunpani/ 

Appliance Dealer today. 

6n.E.863 




SAN FRANCISCO NATIONAL BANK 

A DISTINGUISHED NAME IN BANKING 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL INSURANCE CORPORATION 
FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



260 CALIFORNIA STREET 



YUkon 1-4100 



FOR THE BEST IN WOMEN'S and MENS SHOES 

THE SHOE RACK STORES 

WOMEN'S SHOES 

LATEST STYLES - BEST QUALITY - DISCOUNT PRICES 

STORE No 1, 1609 POLK STREET PR. 6-4007 

MEN'S SHOES 



STORE No. 2, 142') POLK ST., S.in Fr.i 



THE RECOR 



PERIODICAL OdPi'. 

OCT 'di 196J 

■an PRANCIHQU 

^uauQ uanAiiy 



bay "Wind. 




EW ERA AIRPORT: A week-long' series of invitational activities 

an Francisco International Airport was climaxed with a one-day 

Ic preview of the new $14 million South Terminal during which 

ral public officials acted agreeably like very human beings: 

id Mayor Geoi-ge Christopher, pointing at an enormous commemo- 

'e plaque and grinning at an assortment of news photographers: 

minal, you are dedicated!" 

, he turned to PUC President 

rt N. Greenberg and said: 

1, I guess that does it!" 

id Najeeb E. Halaby— the Ad- 

strator of the Federal Aviation 

icy who handled his somewhat 

exing roles during the various 

jrt events with the aplomb of 

)scar-winner — acted for the 

>graphers by pointing to the 

le and at the same time mar- 

g: "Never have I seen so much 



BSident Greenberg wore his 
of master of ceremonies like 
d shoe. He unveiled the plaque 
■ creation of N. Greenberg & 
—several times for the benefit 
le press and television cam- 
then moved to an impressive 
I for remarks. 

[lowing the remarks — during 
1 he recalled the days some 36 
I ago when Charles A. Lind- 
got stuck in the mud attempt- 
j take off — he spotted Halaby. 
IS seconds too late for the top 
ic cop of the nation's airlanes: 
ras trapped. So he returned, 
■eenberg's behest, to the mike 
jjounee that there were three 




thoughts he would take back to 
Washington and to the President: 
1 1 An impression of "great, bur- 
geoning prosperity" at San Fran- 
cisco International Airport, an air- 
port designed to .serve "not merely 




STUART N. GREENBERG 
President, Public Utilities Commission 



MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 



FY-COUNTY RECORD 

Magazine of Good Government 

an Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN 
Editor and Publi.^her 

tablished at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-1212 

Subscription $5.00 Per Year 

SEPT. -OCT, 1963 
umc 30 Number 5 



CLUB CATERING CO. 

Mrs. Dorothea Guttman Gansburg, President 
A. Jack Gansburg, General Manager 

Inflight and Industrial 
Food Services 



1461 Old Bayshore Blvd. 



Diamond 2-6361 



BURLINGAME, California 



a vast area —but the entire world." 
21 An impression of "the great, 
lovely, warm hospitality that is 
always San Francisco." 

3l Wonder that Miss Universe 
had not been selected from the 
"magnificently endowed stew- 
ardae" at San Francisco Airport. 
( "Stewardae" is a natural enough 
plural form employed by Halaby 
on behalf of the esoteric, Latin- 
minded New Frontier.) 

(Continued on Page 141 



ALITALIA 
AIRLINES 



Super DC-8 Rolls Royce Jet-Liner 
Services from the U.S.A. and Can- 
ada to Europe, and the Near East, 
Asia, Africa and Australia. 

Immediate connections by 
CARAVELLE lET 

EX 7-4848 
364 POST ST. 



STANLEY P. SATTERFIELD 

QUALITY PAINTING & 
PAINT BURNING 

Residential — Commercial 
Industrial 

Licensed Contractor 

INSURED FOR P.D. ac P.L. 

1553 FULTON 
FI 6-9632 



EMBER - OCTOBER, 1963 



ORAL L MOORE 

GENERAL MANAGER, HETCH HETCHY PROJECT 
City and County of San Francisco 



By DEAN ST. DENNIS 



In late October, the Federal Power Commission in Washington, planning for the city's water needs 

D.C., will make a decision of vital importance to the city of San after 2015? 
Francisco. "The year 2015 is too far away 

It will be a decision affecting everyone in the city who uses water — for us to begin planning definite- 



How much higher? About 12 
cent to the average home ovn 
Moore said. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



ly," Moore said. "Desalinization is 

who one possibility for the future." he 

said, adding: "It will boil down 

r\entually to a matter of econ- 



and that means every single resident of San Francisco: 

Everyone who turns the tap to got a drink of water, everyoi 
sprinkles their lawn, the house- 
wives who draw water for washing _^^^^^^»^ 
clothes and dishes, the industrial titP^9tK^^ "niy." 
and business firms for whom water ^^ ^^^B^ '^^^''^ '^ *" interesting sidelight 
is a dire necessity. / ^ t» the matter of current economy 

„, J . . . , J V . fi,„ k i 111 the city's water supply. 

The decision to be made by the 1 ^ "= •' ^'^ ■' 

FPC will be whether to grant a f -i "Our department is the one that 

license for construction of the New flpk ^j?^ ^«»' O'W P'ovides Hetch Hetchy water to 

Don Pedro Dam and Reservoir on ^ff tT^ ' \ ^M the San Francisco Water Depart- 

the Tuolumne River some 100 ■ A '^^^ ment and in a sense we're the 

miles due east of San Francisco V >. . flh^^H "^y'^ ^^'^'' wholesaler. We also 

,^ .^ ,. . , , ,. „ „;,,, w^iST 1 'l^^^^^^H generate hydroelectric power — 

If the license IS granted, the city IHC^- — < ^XR^^^^I . , , ^, . ., ^ 

.„ ,_ v,„ » .„ ^^r^ "^^t^^^M which defrays the cost of water to 

will have no worries about an ^K Bi^^^H 

,- J ^ . „,., „, ., W V^^H the customer, Moore said, 

abundant water supply until well W ^ ^^H 

after the turn of the century. If ^^^K,^^ ^^M "^^^ ''^''^^ existing generating 
it is not granted, the city could ^^^V*^ ,^^H P'*^"'^ "°^ produce 215,000 kilo- 
be in real trouble. ^^^^^^H ^^ ^^^^^k watts of power — and a fourth now 
. . ^^^^^^^V ^^^ ^^^^^^1 under construction will add some 
One person who is not worried ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ 

about the outcome of the FPC ORAL L. MOORE ^°'°°° •<>l°^a"«- 

deliberations is Oral L. Moore, gen- chief, Hetch Hetchy '"^^ f"''"'^h all municipal de- 

eral manager of the Hetch Hetchy partments with power and all the 

Project and Utilities Engineering with the rest coming from the street lights. We also sell power," 

Bureau of the city Public Utilities '^'t-V's partners in the project-the Moore said, "to a variety of in- 

Commission. Turlock and Modesto irrigation dustrial and irrigation district 

The FPC hearings have been districts. customers. 

completed, all the plans and data The project would take about "This power is a by-product of 

have been submitted, and now it four years to complete. And it the water system, but a very luc- 

is just a matter of waiting until could be started, Moore said, in rative one. Without this, the cost 

the decision is handed down late the spring of 1964. of water would be much higher," 



in October. 

Moore is confident of the out- 
come. "There is little chance the 
FPC will turn down the Don Pedro 
Dam permit," he said in a recent 
interview. 

The Hetch Hetchy system cur- 
rently has a delivery capacity of 
160 million gallons of water a day, 
and throughout the year probably 
averages actual delivery of 150 
million gallons a day. 

If Don Pedro is built, the city's 
supply can be increased to 295 
million gallons a day, Moore said. 

"It would provide for the needs 
of San Francisco and its service 
area until the year 2015," he 
added. 

The Don Pedro project would 
cost about $90 million- with San 
Francisco's share of the cost about 
$42 million. The Federal govern- 
ment would contribute $5 million. 



Is there any need now to .start Moore said. 



E. MARTINONI CO. 

Wholesalers and Rectifiers of 
Distilled Spirits 

"Established 1874" 

70 BERRY STREET 

San Francisco, California 
EXbrook 7-2760 



TOULOUSE 
FRENCH imW 

Laundry & Cleaning 

821 Lincoln Way 
MO 4-1634 



TAD'S STEAKS 

Enjoy a Quality Steak, Reasonafa 
Priced 

TAD'S STEAKS $1.19 

Including Salad, Baked PotatOf 
French Bread and Butter 

Quickly Served 
in a Pleasant Atmosphere 

Imitated but Never Equalled I 
at the Price 

120 Powell St. 
San Francisco 



(Insist on the Best) 

SUPERIOR 
DRIVING SCHOOL 



Being a Supe 
Best Insuran 



,r Drirer is the 
' you can buy! 



1322 NORIEGA ST. 
LO 6-6800 



BILL NDTTER'S GARAGE 

specialists on Wheel Alignmen 

Brakes and Motor Tune-up 

MACHINE SHOP 

515 Visltacion Ave. JU. 7-'>l 

Bill Barca San Frand 



THE RECC 



Arouud and About 



By WHIT HENRY 

in Franciscans who want to see good intercollegiate sports without 
Ing the city should acquaint themselves with San Francisco State 
!gC. 

in Francisco State College is a member of the Far Western Con- 
ice. The other members of the FWC are University of California 
lavis. Sacramento State, Chico State. Humboldt State, University 

evada and Alameda State. As 

llameda Sate does not compete Gator athletes in intercollegiate 
Otball. competition are required to meet 

le Gators play their home foot- strict NCAA and FWC academic 
games at David J. Cox Sta- standards. The athletic and recrea- 
I, a concrete structure in a (ion program was conceived to pro- 
ral bowl setting on the campus yj^jg maximum benefits to all stu- 
h is located within the San dents during their college and pro- 
.cisco city limits. Parking fa- fessional careers, 
es are available on and off the gne link whcih has long been 
)us near the stadium. Press— missing in the chain between farm- 
— TV facilities are located in p,. producer and \n-ban consumer in 
?ress Box on the south side of gan Francisco has been a modern, 
leld. efficient wholesale produce market, 

r. State is a co-educational. With the dedication of the new San 
lenominational state college. Francisco Produce Terminal, this 
IS a present enrollment of ap- can no longer be said, 
imately 14.000 full-time and The new terminal at Islais Creek, 
time students. The college was built on a 25-acre site, incorporates 
led in 1899 with an initial en- every modern device for the fast, 
lent of 82 pupils. The modern economical, receipt, storage and 
campus is on a 100-acre site distribution of perishable produce 
looking beautiful Lake Mer- at an estimated savings of $2,000.- 
ind within sight of the Pacific qqq or more annually for con- 
n. Three popular modern resi- sumers. 

al and shopping communities -phe move from the old outmoded 
sstlake. Stonestown and Park "commission district" near the Bay 
ed — surround the campus. city's Ferry Building was not, how- 

cilities and super\'ision are ever, accomplished overnight. As a 
ided at the college for all types measure of the time it took, con- 
.thletic and recreation pro- sider that when the San Francisco 
IS. SFSC is a member of the Chamber of Commerce agricultural 
jnal Collegiate Athletic Asso- committee was created 22 yeais 
)n I NCAA) and the Amateur ago. it chose as its "Project No. 1" 
Jtic Union of the United States promotion of a modern, new whole- 
U). (Continued on Page 111 






MORTUARY 


I5«0 FRUITVAIE AVENUE. OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 


Phone 533.4M4 



REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 

1600 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco 9, California 

PRospect 6-0880 



VOLKSWAGEN 

— Distributors — 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA - NORTHERN NEVADA - UTAH 

ARTCRAFT NEON CO. 

2230 THIRD STREET MA. 1-8282 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

LARRABURU BROS. INC. 

The Bakers Who Made San Francisco French Bread Famous* 

Sold in Most Markets 

365 THIRD AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 21 

BAyvicw 1-4112 

* B.ikcts' Day" A«,itJ. PHl.E., Fifsl Prf!c. S.,n Friinci,>c.,, I'Mi 

Pacific Coast Builders 

No. 1 South Park 
San Francisco 



rEMBER - OCTOBER, 196} 



Lee McDonough Cites Need For Leadership, Action and 
Economy In Sheriff's Office 



A. V. (Lee I McDonough, candi- 
date for Shei-Uf and a veteran of 
14 years with the San Francisco 
Police Department, called for a 
return to efficient law enforcement 
and economy of operation as his 
campaign swimg into high gear 
early this month. 

McDonough, a former Police 
Sergeant, resigned his position in 
mid-June of this .year when the 
Police Commission twice denied 
him leave of absence without pay 
to run for the Sheriff's office. Mc- 
Donough based his request for 
leave on Section 5 of the City 
Charter which had previously been 
declared unconstitutional in a rul- 
ing by the then Judge of the 
Superior Court, John B. Molinari. 

"Leaders from all walks of life." 
McDonough said, "are alarmed at 
the inaction and Ineffciencies dis- 
played by the incumbent. He has 
shown a remarkable lack of leader- 
ship, slight knowledge of adminis- 
trative procedures and has dem- 
onstrative apparent disregard for 
the taxpayers' dollars during the 
past seven and one-half years." 

McDonough said that "it is time 
for a change in the Sheriff's office" 
and declared: 

"During the coming weeks, 1 will 
pinpoint the many deficiencies of 
the incumbent and will fully ex- 
plore his lack of performance of 
official duties." 

Frank F. McBean, retired Cit.v 
employee and prominent labor 
leader, is McDonough's campaign 
chaii-man. Said McBean: 

"Lee's resignation after 14 years 
of dedicated service is proof pos- 
itive that he will wage an all-out 
campaign for victory in November. 
At the same time, he does not 
believe that public employees 
should be looked upon as second- 
class citizens with forfeiture of 
their positions hanging over their 
heads if they want to run for elec- 
tive office." 

Prior to resigning, McDonough 
headed an undercover squad, 
known in the Department as "Mc- 
Donough's Raiders." He supervised 




A. V, (Lee) McDONOUGH 

all motorized patrol vehicles for 
the Southei-n Police Station be- 
tween the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 
3:00 a.m.. and conducted all under- 
cover investigations in the South 
of Market area. 

McDonough's background com- 
bines far-ranging experience in 
both fields of business and labor. 
He was a laborer, truck company 
owner, and a licensed real estate 
salesman. As a combat veteran of 
World War II, he was twice 
wounded during action in Dutch 
New Guinea and the Philippines. 

By training, experience and na- 
ture, McDonough is especially 
mindful of the need to conserve 
the City's tax dollars. 

Long active in programs for 
civic and youth improvement. Mc- 
Donough is a member of the Police 
Athletic League. Commonwealth 
Club, Veterans Political Council, 
Crocker- Amazon Improvement 
Club. Apartment House Associa- 
tions Consolidated, American Le- 
gion Police Post 456. Sons of Italy, 
San Francisco Irish- American 
Club, plus various church groups 
and other organizations. 

A San Francisco home owner 
and taxpayer, McDonough is 38 
.years of age and is married to the 
former Lena Boccaleoni, a native 
San Franciscan. They have two 
children, Rickey, 14, and Deanna 
Lee, 12, who atend Portola Junior 
High School. McDonough and his 
family reside at 5.551 Mission St. 



WEINSTEIN CO. 

1041 MARKET STREET 

YOUR hKIENDl.Y DEPARTMENT STORS 

BRANCHES: 

100 Market Street 820 Clement Street 

615 Market Street 130 West Portal 

1620 Polk Street 



EAGLESON 
ENGINEERS 



615 Sansome Street 
San Francisco 11, Californij 



STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

815 BRYANT ST. at 6th MArket 1-306J 

San Francisco 3, California 



DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-4700 
751 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIl 

Sweetheart Hams and Bacon I 

"Idaho Quality Fed Beef" ■ 




Claude Bcrhouet and Claudine Bcrhouct, Propi, 

Hotel de France 

BAR - RESTAURANT - HOTEL J 

780 BROADWAY — SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone GA 1-6410 



FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP 
EARL FILBROOK 

AUTO - FIRE - TRUCK - LIFE 



2TO4 5LOAT BOULEVARD 



supervisor Harold Dobbs 



HERO FIREMEN RECEIVE AWARDS 



When Supervisor Harold Dobbs 
mounced his candidacy for May- 
; he made one promise — a big 
le. 

And on that promise he has and 
111 continue to make good. He 
id he will face up to every issue 
the campaign. He said he will 
ntinue his twelve years study of 
ty problems as Supervisor — and 
;ting Mayor, on many occasions 
and he will come through with 
>rkable answers without regard 
votes, but with careful attention 
facts and what appears best for 
I the people. 

Because he lives here, tours the 
;y weck-in-and-week-out, talks to 
ople to get their thinking re- 
rdless of their economic status, 
irold Dobbs decided the first 
lue to tackle was crime on our 
:eets, the right of a person to 
ke a walk, remain secure in his 
me or conduct his neighborhood 
)rc without looking up at a cus- 
nner and facing a hoodlum with 
gtm in his hand. 
What did Harold Dobbs do? He 
ide plank one in his campaign 
»tform the addition of at least 
D more policemen to the San 
ancisco Police Department — not 
in patrolling in cars but men 
unding beats. 

"Put the bluecoat on the street 
d the hoodlums will soon observe 
it he can't run amok in this 
y." said Dobbs. 

[n addition to these patrolmen. 
Mayor, he will ask the Board of 




HAROLD DOBBS, Supervisor 

Supervisors for money for a new 
lighting system. Two examples of 
what adequate street lighting can 
do now exist, he pointed out, in 
the vicinity of Presbyterian and 
St. Mary's Hospitals. 

In speaking of these two trial 
lighting systems, Dobbs says: 

"Take a look at them. It is lit- 
erally the difference between day 
and night." 

Asked if San Francisco can 
afford the cost of additional police 
and sufficient lighting to make the 
streets sate for law abiding cit- 
izens, Dobbs replied: 

"There is a simple and conclu- 
sive an.swer to that question. San 
Francisco can't afford not to make 
the streets safe. 

(Continued on Page 12 1 



CINCOTTA BROTHERS 

Distributors 

MARINE HARDWARE 
FISHERIES SUPPLIES 



169 JEFFERSON STREET 
San Francisco 11, California 

Branch: Monterey, California 
Telephone: PRospect 5-8977 




From left to right — Fireman Jerome Green, Joseph Kocher, Nelson Lee, Fred 
Fredann. (Fireman Fredann was later awarded the gold medal as "Fireman of 
tfic Year"), John Healy and Captain Donald Beck. 

Chet Born, Official PhotuKrapher S.F.F.D. 
CAPTAIN DON BECK 
LIEUTENANT JOHN HEALY 



Recommended for a "C" Award 
for their meritorious conduct F'eb- 
ruary 4, 1982, in the rescue of a 
man trapepd by fit e and smoke un- 
der the bridge ramp at Fremont 
and Harrison Streets. 

FIREMAN MARIO FREDANN 

Recommended for a "C" Award 
for his meritorious conduct on 
April 6, 1962, on the rescue of an 
unconscious man from a burning 
room of a second story apartment. 

FIREMAN NELSON LEE 

Recommended for a "C" Award 
for his meritorious conduct on Jan- 
uary 23. 1962. in the rescue of a 
man from a blazing room on the 
third floor of an apartment house 
at 3906 Mission Street. 

FIREMAN JEROME GREEN 
FIREMAN JOSEPH KOCHER 

Recommended lor a "D" Award 
for their meritorious conduct on 
August 19, 1962, in the rescue of a 
nine-year-old boy from practically 
certain death when the boy fell 
into the rapid flow of an open 
sewer. 



Goldenrath's Penthouse Buffeteria 

Vf H. LIEBES & CO. 



GRAND Ave. and 



Ieary 



Mike & Jim's Garage 

VA. 6-1886 
3950 - 24th STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Civic Center Cleaners 

61 McAllister street 

UN. 1-4490 
San Francisco, California 

DARRELL'S 
RESTAURANT 

128 EMBARCADERO 
SU. 1-6252 



JIMBO'S BOP CITY 

1690 POST STREET 

FI. 6-2412 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Vote YES on Proposition "P' 



PTEMBER - OCTOBER, 1963 



DIRECTORY OF CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



"*^°"-i,y Hall MA 1-010:1 

•><^orpc Christopher. Mayor 

John r> Sullivan. Executive Secretary 
Uobort M. Smalley. Confidential Secretary 
Marearet Smith. Personal Secretary 
John U Mootz. Administrative Assistant 
Irwin J Mussen. Urban Kenowal Coordinator 
Cyril J. Roche. Principal Administrative Analyst 

SUPERVISORS. BOARD OF 

23', Citv Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets Monday at 2 P.M. 

Peter Tamaras. President. 1020 Harrison 

William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 

Uoeer Boas. 2323 Gear}' St. 

Joseph M. Casey. 2528 Ocean Ave. 

Harold S. Dobbs. 351 California St. 

Or Charles A. Ertola. 2S3 Columbus Ave. 

John J. Ferdon. 1S5 MontKOmery St. 

J Max Mnore. .i9,S Potrero Ave. 

Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 703 Market St. 

Jack Morrison. 2.''>00 Creenwlch St. 

Joseph K. TInney, 2517 Mission St. 

Robert J. Dolan. Clerk 

TJlllan M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial & Industrial Development — Boas. Blake. 

County State and National Affairs— Ferdon, Dobbs. 

McMahc 
Edu 



itio 
Casey 



Parks and Recreation — Ertola, Blake. 



Halley 



Reve 



and Taxation — Dobbs. Ferdon 



Judiciary. Legislative and Civil Service— TInney, 
McMahon. Morrison 

Police — Casey. Ertola. Tinney 

Public Buildings. Lands and City Planning — Mor- 
rison. Roas. Tinney 

fubliu Health and Welfare — McMahon. Halley, Mor- 
rison 

Public Utilities— Halley, Dobbs. Ferdon 

Streets and Highways — Blake. Boas. Ertola 

Rules — Tamaras. Dobbs. Ertola 

ASSESSOR 

ini Citv H.all KL 2-1910 

Russell L. Wnlden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

L'06 I'ilv Hall HE 1-1322 

Thomas M. O'Connor 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

SSii Brvant St. KL 3-9111 

Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDIER 

S.-,(l Hrvant St. KL 3-1157] 

Edward T. Mancuso 

SH ERIPF 

331 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Matthew C. Carberry 

TREASURER 

110 City Hall HE 1-2121 

John J. Goodwin 



COURTS 



. Harold Caulfield, Presiding 

aymond J. Arata Edward Moikenbuhi 
arl H. Allen Clarence W. Morris 
vron Arnold H.Trr-- ,! N'. nl.rnlh 
r.lin \V. Hussey \\ > ' • l;ii. i. 



iirper 



l.lvyn 1 

oriiian Elkington 
oseph Karesh 
erald S. Levin 
rancis McCarty 
ohn B. Mollnari H. A. van der Zee 

Joseph M. Cummins. Secretary 

480 City Hall UN l-8i 



C.eoiKe W. S.lumfelcl 
William P. Traversu 
Alvin E. Weinberger 



MUNICIPAL. JUDGES OF 
Third Floor. City Hall 



KL 2-3008 



Andrew J. Eyman. Presiding 
I'ltz-Gcrald Ames. Sr. Elton C. I^awless 

Albert A. Axelrod Iceland J. Lazarus 

lOmmet Daly Clarence A. Linn 

Robert J. Drewes George B. Maloney 

Bernard B. Gllckfcid Lawrence S. Mana 

< 'lay ton W. Horn Lenore D. Underwood 

Joseph <;. Kennedy James J. Welsh 

James M. Cannon. Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2-3008 

A. C. McChesney, Jury Commissioner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

850 Bryant St. 
James Leddy. Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

■(.'•.7 City Hall 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
James J. Donohue. Foreman 
Richard L Swig. Secretary 
Ralph A. Sheehan. Statistician 



ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

880 Bryant St. KL 3-9111 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick VauKhan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser. 6S1 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 399 Fremont St. 
Adolph L. Pierotti. 240 Upland Drive 
Frank Ratto. 405 California St. 

JUVENILE COURT 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SB 1-6740 

Hon. Melvyn I. Cronin. Presiding Judge 
Thomas F. Strycuia, Chief Juvenile Probation Olticer 

JUVENILE JUSTICE COMMISSION 

Meets 2nd Thursday of month; 1:00 P.M. 

375 Woodside Avenue 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman. 79 New Montgomery St. 
Reverend Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
Reverend John A. Collins. 225 - 32nd Ave. 
Reverend James B. Fiynn. 1S25 Mission St. 
Miss Myra R. Green. 1362 - 30th Ave. 
Mrs. Horace A. Guittard, 3871 Jackson St. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
William M. Reedy, 55 Fillmore St. 
Mrs. Mathew O. Tobriner. 3494 Jackson St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2S9 City Hall IlK 1-2121 

Sherman P. Duckel 

Joseph Mignoia, Executive Assistant 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harr.v D. Ross 

Wren Middiebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

Maurire Shean 

1545 - ISth Street. N.W., Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. Cleary 

El Mirador Hotel. Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

lliO I.iirkin 

Meets 1st Monday 

Harold L. Zellerbach. President, 1 Bush St. 
Bernard C. Begley M.D., 450 Sutter St. 
Mrs. Albert Campodonico, 2770 Vailejo St. 
Joseph Esherlck. 2065 Powell St. 
Mark Harris, 1600 Hoiloway 
John K. Hagopian. 220 Bush St. 
Betty Jackson. 2835 Vailejo St. 
William E. Knuth. 1600 Hoiloway Ave. 
Burton L. Rockwell. 50 Green St. 
Nell SInton, 1020 Francisco St. 

Ex-Offlcio Members 
Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President, City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 
President. Recreation and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr., Executive Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkln St. HE 1-1 

.Meets every Thursday at 2:30 P.M. 

Louis Mark Cole. President, 1958 Vailejo St. 
Alvin H. Baum. Jr., 2009 Green St. 
James S. Kearney. 400 North Point 
Gardner W. Mein. 315 Montgomery St. 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter, 142 - 27th Avenue 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utilities 

James R. McCarthy, Director of Planning 

Thomas G. Miller, Secretary 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hail IN 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 

Hubert J. Sober, President, 155 Montgomery .- 
Richard C. Ham. 200 Bush St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick. 827 Hyde St. 

George J. Grubb, General Manager, Personnel 



EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

136 Van Ness Avenue 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 
170 Pell St. 



Edward Kemmitt, President. 601 Polk St. 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper, Jr., 10 Walnut St. 
Samuel A. Ladar. Ill Sutter St. 
Mrs. Edward Matzger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. 361 California St. 
James E. Stratten, 800 Presidio Ave. 
Adolfo de Urioste, 512 Van Ness Ave. 

Dr. Harold Spears. Supt. of Schools and ; 



FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 



Philip Dindia. President, 536 Bryant St. 

Dr. Peter Angel. 1867 - loth Ave. 

Charles R. Greenstone. 182 Second St. 

William F. Murray. Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes. Chief. Division of Fire 

Prevention & Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy, Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

450 McAllister St. HI-; 1- 

Meels 2nd Tuesday of month at 4 P.M. 

Frank J. Collins.President, 2614 - 16th Ave. 
George W. Cuniffe, 1627 - 25th Ave. 
Donald M. Campbell. M.D.. 977 Valencia St. 
Donald J. McCook. 220 Montgomery St. 
Thomas W. McGrath, 2940 - 16th St. 

O'Connell, Executive Director 



Lyle 



-Officio Members 

3 Committee, Board of 



Supervi: 
City Attorney 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Joseph P. Mazzola, Chairman. 1621 Market Si 
John E. Gurlch, 300 Montgomery St. 
Solomon E. Johnson. 704 Market St. 
T. Kong Lee. 715 Sacramento St. 
Melvin M. Swig. Fairmont Hotel 

John W. Beard, Executive Director 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

450 McAllister St. Ill 

Meets every Thursday. 4 P.M. 



David Thomson. Chairman. 65 Berry St. 

Arthur S. Becker. 3475 California St. 

Donald Magnin. 77 O'Farreli St. 

G. Baltzer Peterson. 2910 Vailejo St. 

John E. Sullivan. 69 West Portal Ave. 
Vlnlng T. Fisher, Director 
Thomas J. O'Toole. Secretary 



ERMIT APPEALS. BOARD OF 



yilllani H. H. Davis. President. 9S4 Folsom .si, 
V. Allen Ehrhardt. 2 San Rafael Way 
leorge H. Glllln. 4091 - 19th Ave. 
aek Riordnn. 990 Geary 

)r. TlK.s. \V. S. VVu. Vli-e Pn-s., Mil StiKl<l"n .si. 
.1. Rdwin Mnttox. Kxeeutive Seerttiiry 

iQLICE COMMISSION 

S!10 l{r.vant Street KI. :i-91ll 

Moet.s every Monday at 5:00 P.M. 

larold R. MeKinnon. I're.sident. 255 California SI. 

ttui -A. HisslnKtr. n.-. Saiisc.nu- St. 

Ion Kay.ac-kerifv. s.M ll.uvaid Si. 
Thomas J. l-ahill. c ■|ii.l ,.f Police 
Alfred J. Xeldcr. ntpulv I'hief of Police 
rapt. Cornelius P. Mnriihy, t'hief of Inspectors 
I. Thomas Zaragoza. Ilirector of Traffic 
Capt. John T. Butler. Department Secretnrv 
Lt. William J. O'Hrlcn. Comniissl<in Secretary 



'UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center UK 1-2121 

Meets 1st Tuesday of moiilli at :;::;n P.M. 



Bhn M. Hransten, President. 665 - :)rd St. 

I. Morris Cox. Mills Tower 

o.-se M. KanucchI, 1445 Stockton St. 

lortinier Fliishhacker. Jr.. 601 California St. 

[arearet V. Cirdner. 21.10 Fulton St. 

award E. Heavey. 68 Post St. 

[ilton K. T,epetieh. 1655 Polk Street 

[rs. .1. Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 

lev. William Turner. 1642 Broderick St. 

homas W. S- Wu. P.D.S.. 1111 Stockton St. 
William U. Holman. Librarian 
Frank A. Clarvoe. Jr., Secretary 



UBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

tuart N. Greenberg. President, 765 Folsom St. 

ert Simon, 1350 Folsom St. 

eorere F. Hansen. 215 Market St. 

homas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 

homas F. Stack. 703 Market St. 



Bureaus and Departments 
ccounts, 287 City Hall llIC 1-2121 

George Negri, Director 
irport. San Francisco International, S. F. 2.S 

Belford Brown. Manager 761-0800 

etch Hetchy, 425 Mason St. PK 5-7UO0 

Ural L,. iloore. Gen. Mgr. Hetch Hetchy Project 
and Utilities Kngineering Bureau 

unicipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. Fl e-OUSli 

Vernon \V. Anderson, General Manager 
ersonnei & Safety, 001 Presidio Ave. FI 6-6656 

Paul J. Fanning, Director 
ubiic Service, 287 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons, Director 
'ater Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

James H. Turner, General Manager 



UBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 
5!>5 Bush St. 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday eacl 
at 9:30 A.M. 



'llliam P. Scott, Jr., President, 249 Natoma St. 

r. Xavier Barrios, 2325 Ocean Ave. 

en Blumenthal, 682 Mission St. 

rs. Margaret K. Murray, 8 Ijocksley Drive 

rs. Jacqueline Smith, 657 - 10th Ave. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 
Mrs. Eulala Smith, Secretary to Commission 



ECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren IxidBe. Golden Gate Park SK 1-4866 
Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month 
at 3 P.M. 



alter A. Haas. Sr.. President. 98 Battery St. 

iter Bercut, 1333 Jones St. 

ary Margaret Casey. 532 Mission St, 

'llliam .M. Coffman, 525 Market St. 

ihn F. Conway. Jr.. 3600 Third St. 

r. Francis J. Herz, 450 Sutter St. 

rs. Joseph A. Moore. Jr., 2000 Washington St. 
Raymond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
Uary B. Connolly, Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

625 Golden Gate Ave. UN 3-77; 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 

Everett Griffin, Chairman, 465 California St. 
J;unes H Black. Jr.. 1 Hush St. 
James A. Folper. III. 101 Howard St. 
Walter F. Kaplan. 835 Market St. 
Lawrence R, Palaclos. 355 Hayes St. 

M. Justin Herman, Executive Director 

M. C. Hermann, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

450 McAllister St. HE l-2i: 

Meets every Wednesday at 2 P.M. 

James M. Hamill, President, 120 Montgomery St. 
James M. Crane, 333 Montgomery St. 
Daniel A. Diez, 2261 - 36th Ave. 
William T. Reed, 2161 - 18th Ave. 
Martin F. Wormuth, 4109 Pacheco 

Ex-Officio Members 
President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

Daniel Mattrocce, Secretary 



WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 
VcUrans UuiliUng 
.Meets 2nd Thur-sday each m. 



nth ; 



Ralph J. A. Stern. President. 434 Brannan St. 

Eugene D. Bennett, 225 Bush St. 

Philip S. Boone, 343 Sansome 

Frederic Campagnoli, 300 Montgomery St. 

George T. Davis, 111 Sutter St. 

Frank A. Flynn, 1601 Noriega St. 

Prentis C. Hale, International Bldg. 

Sam K. Harrison, 431 Bryant St. 

Harold B. Hubbard. 6100 Geary Blvd. 

Wilson Meyer, 333 Montgomery St, 

Samuel D. Sayad. 35 Aptos Ave. 

Edward Sharkey, Managing Director 
E. Lawrence George. Executive Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2040 

George D. Culler, Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT 

1701) Jerrold Avenue. Room 201 VA 4-3463 

Raymond L. Bozzini, Commissioner 
Farmers' Market, Bayshore & Alemany 

Frank J. D'Connell. Market Manager .\II 7-9423 

CORONER 

850 Bryant St. KL 3-1694 

Dr. Henry W. Turkel 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-2121 

D. O. Townsend, Chief 

Doyle L. Smith, Superintendent of Electrical Main- 
tenance UN 1-8000, Ext. 324 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

170 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Virgil Elliott. Director 

County Clerk- Recorder HE 1-2121 

Martin Mongan, 317 City Hall 
Public Administrator HE 1-2121 

Cornelius S. Shea, 375 City Hall 
Registrar of Voters HE 1-2121 

Charles A. Rogers, 156 City Hall 
Tax Collector HE 1-2121 

Basil Healey, 107 City Hall 
Records Center HE 1-2121 

John J. Riordan, 160 Otis 

PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-4701 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox, Director of Public Health 
Dr. Francis J. Curry, Asst. Director Public Health 
Arthur G. Burns, Asst. Director Public Health for 

Hospital Services 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City EM 6-4633 

Dr. Szu T. Tsou, Superintendent 
Laguna Honda Hospital, 7lh Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

L'.iuis A. I^Ioran. Superintendent MO 4-1680 

San Francisco General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Dr. T. E. Albers, Superintendent MI 8-8200 

Emergency Hospital Service (Five Hospitals) 

Eirl Blake. Superinliiident KL 3-1574 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens, Director 

R. Brooks Larter, 

Assistant Director. Administrative 

3. Myron Tatarian 

Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 
Accounts, 260 City Hall HE 1 

J. J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
Architecture. 265 City Hall HE 1 

Charles W. Griffith, City Architect 
Building Inspection, 450 McAllister St. HE 1 



Robert C. I.«vy. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army HE 1 

A. If. Kkenberg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 450 McAllister St. HE 1 

Sidney Franklin. SupervLsor 
Egineering, 3.59 City Hall HE 1 

Clifford J. Oeertz. City Engineer 
Sewer Repair & Sewage Treatment, 2323 Army 

Walter H. Jones. Superintendent HE 1 

Street Cleaning, 2:i23 Army St. HE 1 

Bernard M. Crotty, Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St. HE 1 

Charles McFadden. Acting Superintendent 
Urban Renewal. 450 McAllister St. HE 1 

Bernard A. Cummlngs. Analyst 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall HE 1- 

Ben Benas, Purcha.ser of Supplies 

T. F. Conway. Chief Assistant 
Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 800 Quint 

A. M. Flaherty. Superintendent 
Equipment and Supplies, 15th and Harrison Sts. 

J. E. Leary. Supervisor 
Tabulation and Reproduction, Room 60 

George Stanley. Supervisor 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

450 McAllister St. HE 1- 

Philip L. Rezos. Director of Propertv 
James T. Graham, Auditorium Mgr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS A MEASURES 

6 City Hall HE 1- 

O. C. Skinner, Jr. 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



-2121 

-2121 

-2121 

•2121 

■2121 

-2121 

St. 
■2121 
2121 

-2121 

-2121 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-5100 

l>r. c.corge E. Lindsay 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF 
THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday, Jan., April, June, Oct. 
3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 
Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, Honorary President, 

2 Pine St. 
William R. Wallace. President. 100 Bush St. 
Mrs. Alexander Albert, 2320 Lyon St. 
E. Raymond Armsby. 631 O'Fanell St. 
Louis A. Benoist, 3/ Drumm St. 
Joseph M. Bransten. 665 - 3rd St. 
Osgood Hooker. 55(1 Eucalyptus Rd.. Hill.-iliorough 
Walter S. Johnson. 2740 Hyde St. 
Mrs. Bruce Kelham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 
Charles Mayer, San Francisco Examiner 
David Pleydell-Bouverle, Glen Ellen, Calif. 
Mrs. Henry Potter Russell, 1420 Montgomery St. 
John N. Rosekrans, 333 Montgomery St. 
Whitney Warren. Ill Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach, 1 Bush St. 

Ex-Officio Members 
Mayor 
President, Recreation & Park Commission 

Thomas Carr Howe. Jr.. Director 

Capt. David J. Walsh, Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Mon. Jan., April, June, Oct.. 2.30 P.M. 

Mrs. George T. Cameron. Honorary President 

Richard S. Rheem. President 

Adm. E. B. McKinney. Executive Secretary 

Sheldon (^. Cooper. Garret McEnerney. II. R. Gwin 

Follls, Clifford V. Heimbucher. Koscoe F. (lakes, 

Charles Page. Richard S. Rheem. Charles de Young 

Thieriot. 

Board of Trustees 

.Miss Louis.- A. Bnyd. 210 Post St. 

.Mrs. Go irgc T. Cameron. Box 506. Hurlinganu- 

.Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon G. Cooper, 669 Hyne Rd., San 
Mateo 

Mr. and Mr*. R. Gwin Follls. 3690 Washington St. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford V. Heimbucher, 220 Bush St. 

.Mr. and Mr.s. Garret McEnerney. U, 3725 Washing- 
ton St. 

.Mr. and Mrs. Grover A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel. 
.\pt. A. Powell and Gearv Sts. 

Roscoe F. Oakes. 2006 Washington St. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Page. 601 California St. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Rheem, 1659 Russ Bldg., 
2.!5 .Monlanm.rv St. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Charles de Young Thieriot, 1802 Florl- 
bund.a Ave.. Hillsborough 

.Mrs, William P. Roth. Filoll. San .Mateo. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Jn.seph (), Tobin. Hibernia Bank. 1 



LAW LIBRARY 

436 City Hall HI 

Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBLIC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. M> 

i Charles W. Frledrichs, Executive Secretary 



iPTEMBER - OCTOBER, 1963 



MOORE 

(Continued from Page 4) 

A vital part of the water supply 
system is its transmission facili- 
ties, and the city is making a big 
step forward in this field. 

A new. 47-mile-long pipeline is 
now being built across the San 
Joaquin Valley. Eleven miles of it 
is completed, and the project is 
scheduled to be finished in 1967. 

In addition to furnishing water 
to San Francisco. Moore's de- 
partment also distributes Hetch 
Hetchy water to a large number 
of communities on the Peninsula. 

But his department has more 
jobs than that. 

"Our bureau is a service bureau 
of the public utilities family which 



provides engineering services to 
the Municipal Railroad, the air- 
port, and Hetch Hetchy. We han- 
dle all design and construction. 
This is a very Important phase of 
our work." 

Moore, who is 42, assumed his 
present post in March of 1961. 

He has been in city service since 
1948. when he became a junior 
engineer supervising construction 
for the Municipal Railway. 

Later, he became resident en- 
gineer for construction of the 
Cherry Valley Dam and in 1957 
was named construction engineer 
for all three of the city's utilities 
departments. 

He and his wife, Katherine, have 
fovu- children: Kathy, 15; Jim, 13; 
Joann, 11; and Marjorie, 2. 



The Lowrie Paving Co., Inc. 

J. F. Lowrie, President — James W. Lowrie, Vice-Presidenl 

S.in Francisco Yard: 2170 Oakdale Ave, San Francisco 24, Calif. 

R. J. Kilroy, Superintendent 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

C'.rading - - Pavinsj — Underground Construction 

Main Office and Yard: Lowrie Avenue, South San Francisco, Calif. 

(415) PO 1-2265 (415) JU 3-3574 



Fuller Paint — DuPont Paint 

SCOn'S HARDWARE 

ED HERM.ANY 
Homewarcs — Builders Hardware 
2501 IRVING (Cor. 26th Ave.) 

Phone SE 1-1149 



H & R TRANSMISSION 
SERVICE 

BOB SMITH 

Wc Give New Lilc to Your Ci 

764 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

TU 5-5025 



C&MMEATCO. 

Wholesale Jobbers 

I'iKjncv AS J-3461) — AS 3-8747 

2842 San Pablo Ave 

BERKELEY 



A-1 Glen Hunter Moving 

EXPRESS 8C TRANSFER 

Stale-Wide Service 

3330 ORTEGA STREET 

MO 1-2644 LO 6-4300 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturers of 
Instruments for Hand Surf^ery 
Active H.ind 3C Finger Splints 

70 -12th STREET 
MA 1-6876 



PICKWICK 
Motor Hotel 

0. C. CAMPBELL, Mgr. 
Sth & Mission Sts. 

San Francisco 

GA 1-7S00 

Free Overnight Parking 

Bus to Ball Park at Front Door 
Visit Our 

BYLINE 

Coeklail Lounge 



George E. Chase 
& Associates 

114 SANSOME STREET 
GA 1-1277 



PARK HOTEL 

Clean ■ Reasonable Rates 

1040 FOLSOM ST. 

UN 1-9397 



SHELLEY ATTACKS 
CITY'S PROBLEMS 




JOHN F. SHELLEY 

A smashing attack on problems 
of housing, employment and edu- 
cation in San Francisco was 
pledged by Congressman John F. 



Shelley recently at the offici 
launching of his campaign t 
Mayor. 

San Francisco, he told a sell-o 
civic luncheon of nearly 1.000 pt 
.■ion.s at the Sheraton Palace Hot 
is staggering under the impact 
ethnic and economic changes th 
threaten to turn the city "into 
dismal jungle." 

His program for city gover 
ment includes filling in of tidelan 
to bring manufacturers of ele 
tronics and rocket hardware 
San Francisco, a Co-ordinator 
Planning, Housing, and Develo 
ment to bring order out of t 
present "disgraceful mess," gres 
ei- regional co-operation; and 
revitalization of demoralized ci* 
agencies. 

He called for .scenic recreation 
parkway along the perimeter 
San Franci.sco from Fort Funsti] 
to Mission creek, city control 
the State-owned harbor, and der 
olition of the Embarcadero Fre 
way — declaring he would like 
sling the first sledgehammer i 
bring down "the Monster of Ui 
Embarcadero." 



Vote YES 

on "F" 



FIREMEX 



GEORGE KWOK - General Agent 

Manhattan Life Insurance Co., N.Y. 

752 SACRAMENTO ST. 
EX. 2-0989 



GEORGE ERK.SON 
Chevron Station 

4801 MLSSION STREET 
JU 4-5400 



Pacific Meat Co. 

New Management • JIM MARSHALL 

6386 MISSION ST. 

PL. 5-9670 i 

DALY CITY i 



Baylacq French Laundry 

Reliable Laundry Scrvl.. 

116 CLEMENT STREI I 

SK l-OO-l 



THE RI;X OP 



WHIT HENRY 

K'onlinueii from Page 5) 
sale produce market. 

At about the same time, the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, in the 
flr.st of a series of studies, .spelled 
out why the niaiket should be mod- 
ernized and how much it would 
save. 

A group of merchants resisted 
the move to the bitter end, fighting 
a roar guard action that will go 
into the history books as a classic. 
Not until the city's need for the 
area for the $80 million "Golden 
Gateway" project became para- 
mount could the move be com- 
pelled. 

Some merchants pulled out and 
formed a rival produce terminal in 
South San Francisco. But the Islais 
Creek terminal is San Francisco's 
Jfficial terminal. Its operations will 
i)e watched with interest. Farmers 
:an congratulate them.selves on 
jetting faster, better handling of 
their produce and city consumers 
should get an added dividend of 
savings from speeding produce to 
Jieir dinner tables. 

The new produce terminal at 
Islais Creek, replacing the century 
)Id "commission district" near the 
rerry Building, formerly was a 
Harine Corps supply base. 

On a 25-acre site, foui' huge 



buildings will house a total of 84 
stalls in which the produce mer- 
chants will store their merchandise 
and from which they will conduct 
their operations. 

In contrast to the old district 
where trucks were imloaded on 
crowded streets, the new ware- 
houses are truck-bed high. Produce 
trucks can be unloaded at floor 
level. Savings from this and other 
innovations are estimated to save 
local consumers more than $2 mil- 
lion a year. 

The terminal will include three 
restauarnts, a bank, service station 
spur tracks, office building and 
dormitories. 

In the old days of gold in Cal- 
ifornia, winter in the mountains 
could be a very dreary thing. It 
wasn't only that it was cold, it was 
lonely, and many a homesick miner 
spent long winter nights wondering 
about the mail from home that 
might be waiting for him over at 
Carson City in Nevada. 

This was the sad situation, points 
out the National Automobile Club, 
(Continued on Page 13) 



ROBERT ALCHIAN 

JEWELER - WATCHMAKER 

Diamouds-Anliques-Gifts 

1123 Taraval Street OV 1-6389 

PORTOLA DRAYAGE 

Cargo Insured, Local i Lonq Distance 

FREDERICK C. GOMES 

1467 VAN DYKE AVE. 

MI. 8-3160 



OUR LADY'S NURSING HOME 

24 HOUR NURSING CARE 

FOR CONVALESCENT and ASED 

Martha Ellsworth. Operator-Manager 

1354 - 27th Ave., San Francisco 



BRADLEY CAMERA 

SALES - SERVICE 

Budget Plan 

1126 MARKET STREET 

HE. 1-7476 



Harold J. Cassidy Co. 

REAL ESTATE 

1900 IRVING STREET 
MO. 1-3550 
San Francisco 



CIGAR 



HESS 

; LIQUOR STORE 



DON S CARLENE RIDINGTON 

DOMESTIC t IMPORTED LIQUORS 

2280 Chestnut St. WE. 1-8668 



BRISTOL AGENCY 

Baby Sitters - Nurses 

641 OFARRELL ST. 
PR. 6-9100 



RICK'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

General Repairs • E»pert Mechanics 

Pronnpt Service — Reasonable 

RICK THOMPSON, New Ownetr 

902 BUSH STREET 

OR. 3-5567 



BAY MEAOOWS HOTEL 

Clean - Reasonable Rates 

116 MASON STREET 

GA. 1-9809 



STAGI LIQUORS 

Complete Line of 
WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 

3055 SIXTEENTH ST. 

UN. 3-3123 



GEORGE'S 

Hallmark Cards for All Occasions 

3237 - 22nd Street 
AT. 2-0881 



A&B La DEW 
ENGINEERING. INC. 



1370 WALLACE AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Mission 8-8585 



LUMBER -TOP QUALITY 

City-wide Delivery 



1532 NOREIGA STREET 

LO. 4-5440 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1917 JUNIPERO SERRA 
PL. 6-3833 
DALY CITY 



WHITE LUMBER COMPANY 



AMPLE PARKING - Hours S A.M. •till 5 P.M. 



INOUSTRIAL CARPENTERS UNION, LOCAL 2565 



ROSE M. WHITE, Business Representative 



3608 - 19tli St. 



MA. 1-7819 



San Francisco 



Jordan and Smith, Masonry Contractor 

FIREPLACES. BRICK, STONE and BLOCK »^ORK 

137- lOth AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO 18 

Phones: BA. 1-3523 and SE. 1-3712 

fVE OFFER STATE-WIDE SERVICE 

ROBINSON 

Brokerage ■ Real Estate ■ Insurance 
1754 DIVISADERO ST. Telephone WE. 1-7177 



EPTEMBER - OCTOBER, 1963 



DOBBS 

( Continiiefi from Page 7 i 

"Every big city has experienced 
in the last few years an increase 
of street violence. 

"San Francisco is no exception 
but due to our efficient police force, 
our rate of crime increase has been 
much lower. 

"In addition to putting hluc:'outs 
on our sidewalks sii there is less 
or no room for the law l>reaker. 1 
am satisfied di'|>arlim>nl effeetive- 
ni-ss can l>e str<'ni;theni>d through 
the aildiliiin of a |>oliee conuiiission 
member professionully trained in 
law enfon-ement work 

"His experience would blend 
with that of the other members of 
the commission in the determina- 
tion of department policy. 

"Every man. woman and child 
in this city is entitled to protec- 
tion on public transportation, on 
the streets, in their homes, or 
wherever they go." 

Supervisor Dobbs, watching the 
growth of San Francisco, acceler- 
ated in the last few years, saw at 
a glance that the log jam resulting 
from the so-called Freeway revolt 
of 19.'J9 had to be broken. 

That revolt came from San 
Franciscans in all walks of life. 
They balked at the tyranny of the 
slide rule thinkers in Sacramento. 
The people of this city refused to 
watch their homes and the beauty 
of their city destroyed by the 
cookie-cutter policy of the engi- 
neers at the State Capitol. 

Aware of public opinion, Harold 
Dobbs led that suecesfnl re\olt a.s 
a member of the BoanI of Super- 
visors. The ;ify thus served notice 
on the Stale it would not be sliced 
to pieces b,v non-residents nor be- 
come simply a freeway interchange 
for persons djashing through at 
the e.vpense of the local taxpayers. 

With that notice served on Sac- 
rnmento, the Supervisor then set 
about planning an intelligent move- 
ment of traffic. He did not want a 
plan which would be satisfactory 
today and unsatisfactory by the 
time it was in opeiation. He 
wanted and has drawn by hard 
work, hard thinking and inspection 
of methods in other cities, a pro- 
gram which should solve the Free- 
way problem once and for all. 

It is now before the Board of 
Supervisors. It is a document 
backed up by facts obtained within 
and without San Francisco. 

As one newspaper editoriall.v ap- 
praised the plan: 

"The Dobbs' program struck us 
as imaginative and affirmative, a 
welcome light in the murk of free- 
way controversy. 



"If San Francisco is to maintain 
its role as the Bay Area's core 
city, it must be of ready access to 
the traveler and cure its internal 
traffic ills." 

Highlights of the Dobbs plan, as 
proposed cit.v policy, are: 

( 1 1 A totally new, completel.v 
undergrounded Golden Gate Free- 
way. The freeway would move 
traffic underground in the vicinity 
of the Embarcadero and Lombard 
Street, tunneling beneath Tele- 
graph and Ru.ssian Hills for ap- 
proximately 1 'i miles, with local 
traffic exits and entrances near 
Fort Mason. The tunnel would then 
connect with an imderwater tube 
along the shoreline outside the 
Marina seawall to Crissy Field in 
the Presidio where the route would 
tie to the presentl.y planned 
widened approach to the Golden 
Gate Bridge. 

(2) A corollary plan to provide 
an approach to a second crossing 
to Marin by means of an under- 
water tube to the submerged island 
of Blo.ssom Rock, a possible bridge 
anchorage site one half mile off 
the San Francisco shoreline which 
would eliminate any bridge con- 
struction in the Telegraph-Russian 
Hill areas. 

(3) Extension of the stub-ended 
Central Freeway by construction 
of a Pacific Heights crosstown 
tunnel. The State currently has 
under study two proposals, not 
necessarily exclusive of each other, 
the tunnel and the Panhandle 
Freeway. These studies will be 
given full study when completed. 

( 4 ) Speed up of surface traffic 
flow by the application of inex- 
pensive new electronic traffic con- 
trol systems already in use in 
Michigan. Canada, Western Ger- 
many and elsewhere. 

The systems inspected by Dobbs 
include Toronto's new program of 
tying signalized intersections into 
a computer control center, and 
electronic traffic pacer system in 
Warren. Michigan, and closed-cir- 
cuit television surveillance system 
on the John C. Lodge freeway in 
Detroit, Michigan. 

"San Francisco cannot afford to 
maintain a horse and buggy traffic 
system in this electronic age." said 
Dobbs. 

What kind of a man is Harold 
Dobbs apart from the inevitable 
political aspects of a citywide cam- 
paign ? 

Son of a carpenter, he was born 
to a middle cla.ss family, worked 
his way through college and was 
graduated from the University of 
California, Hastings College of 
Law. He is currently in practice 
(Continued on Page 15) 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Est.ihlished 1894 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PROTECTION ENGINEERS 
Executive Office and Engineering Department 

142 Ninth Street UNderhill 1-7822 

San Francisco 3, California 

E. A. ROCHETTE 

Agent: WESTERN GREYHOUND LINES 



214 AIRPORT BOULEVARD 

45 SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



JUno 8-11264 



CRAFTSMEN TOOL RENTAL, INC. 

1265 FOLSOM STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. UN. 3-8383 

A UNITED CRUSADE AGENCY 

BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 

COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTER 

JAMES E. STRAHEN, E«ec. Director 

800 PRESIDIO AVENUE WAlnut 1-4758 

San Francisco 15 

MEL WILLIAMS COMPANY 

CANNED & FROZEN FOOD SERVICE 

15 CALIFORNIA STREET 

EX. 2-7366 

MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT and SUPPLIES 

All Types Broom Fibres and Wire — For Street Sweepers, Street Push 

Brooms — Street Flushers and Sewer Cleaning Equipment 

GEORGE L. AVERY 

4516 MOLLIS ST.-OAKLAND 8, CALIFORNIA -OLympic 4-5254 

New Method Laundry & Dry Cleaners 

All Your Laundering and Cleaning Problems Solved with One Call 

MA. 1-0545 40" SANCHEZ ST. 

FRENCH and DANISH PASTRIES — SPECIAL OCCASION CAKES 
Phone JU, 5-9JI3 

RED CHERRY BAKERY 

Diicounti for All Chufchei, Clubs and Oiqjnlijtioni 
4617 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 



12 



THE RECORD 



WHIT HENRY 

(Continued fi-om Page 11) 
^hen in the year 1851 a tall Nor- 
iJegian by the name of John 
'honipson moved into the little 
ettlenient that was then known as 
langtown and is now known as 
'laceiville. John saw the isolation 
if the miners and came to the con- 
hision that something should be 
one about it. 

Having been raised in Norway. 
le knew the ways of snow and the 
rays to get over it, ajid it wasn't 
eiy long before he had managed 
o fashion out of a pair of stiudy 
ak staves a pair of homemade 
kis that were crude but effective. 
Vith these on his feet he set out 
cross coimtry and soon had estab- 
;shed between Hangtown and Car- 
on City a 90-mile route over which 
le brought mail to the lonely 
liners. 

Thompson's route was over a 
i\\d and primitive terrain and the 
lack he carried on his strong 
houldei's usually ran anywhere 
rom 60 to 100 pounds in weight, 
'he eastward journey was mostly 
iphill and working his way through 
he deep .snowfalls and the bliz- 
ards it usually took him around 
hree days to make Carson City. 
)n his way back the going was 
letter and he'd make it into Hang- 
own in a good two days. At night 
16 would shelter beneath some 
ree or in some crevice between 
arge boulders and light a fire close 
ly to keep the frost out of his 
lones. 



Carrying the mail, however, was 
only the routine business of the day 
for "Snowshoc" Thomp.son. Rescu- 
ing of exhausted miners or be- 
wildered parties of immigrants 
gave him an even greater satisfac- 
tion. It is little wonder that the 
man became widely known and 
admired and that even today num- 
bers of visitors journey to his grave 
in Genoa near Reno in Nevada to 
look with great interest on the 
crossed skis that are carved on his 
tombstone. 



I like good music and I feel that 
it is a necessary part of our lives, 
but I can't understand why we 
must be bombarded with it during 
all our waking hours. Airports, 
elevators, restaurants, coffee shops, 
shoe shine stands, stores and so on 
ad nauseum broadcast sounds con- 
tinually. And now I read advertise- 
ments that an airline is featuring 
talking pictures while you fly! If 
I have occasion to fly and am given 
a choice I'll take the opposition 
plane company. 



Here is a bit of verse I learned 
many yeais ago: 

"Go to my father," was all that 

she said; 
But she knew that I knew that 

her father was dead ; 
And she knew that I knew the 

gay life he had led; 
And she knew that I knew what 

she meant when she said: 
"Go to my father!" 



First 

Presbyterian 

Church 

REVEREND E. W. RIMLEY 

Van Ness at Sacramento St. 

PR. 6-5552 



JACK TAR HOTEL 

Van Ness and Geary 

PRospect 6-8200 

San Francisco, California 



Westlake Insurance Agency 

Alt Forms of Insurance 

36 PARK PLAZA DRIVE - DALY CITY 

WALTER F. BRODIE, Manager 

Telephone: PLaza 5-7113 Residence Phone: MOntrose 4-5188 



DELEUW, GATHER & COMPANY 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 



Public Transit 
Traffic t Pdrliing 
Highways 
Urban R«ne»al 



Subways 
Railroads 
Municipal Works 
Porf Development 



1256 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 

UN. 1-1302 

OKLAHOIvfA CITY CHICAGO NEWARK 

WASHINGTON NEW YORK BOSTON BUFFALO 

ENROLL NOW 
BOYS - GIRLS - ADULTS-7th through 12th Grades 

ALL COURSES ACCREDITED — "Prep" for Entranse Exams for West Point, 

Annapolis. Air Force. Coast Guard, Maritime Academies, Naval Reserve and 
College Board. 

ENGLISH FOR FOREIGNERS— Laboratory Chemistry for Nurses 
SECRETARIAL COURSES — Regular High School Courses — Accelerated (two 
years in one) — Private Tutoring — Day and Night 

DREW SCHOOL 

2901 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone FI. 6-4831 



SPECIAL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 

OAKLAND SCAVENGER COMPANY 

2601 PERALTA STREET - OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone TEmplebar 2-3412 

SOUTHSHORE LINES 

Courteous, Prompt Service 
342-3561 

BURLINGAME CHARTER BUSES 

WILSHIRE GASOLINE 

RUELAS & SOLTERO 

Automotive Service 

17th and So. Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, California 

Telephone: KL. 2-2539 

SQUARE DEAL PAINT STORE 

REIHDAR RASMUSSEN 
3600 - I7lh STREET SAN FRANCISCO HE, 1-4054 

Palace Prescription Pharmacy 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS - SUNDRIES 
2800 GENEVA AVE Phone JU. 51334 



EPTEMBER . OCTOBER, 1963 



BAY WINDOW 

I Continued from Page 3) 

Then it was the Mayor's turn: 
Christopher, almost out the door. 
had paused once too often to greet 
a friend. He. too. was trapped by 
the resounding voice of Master of 
Ceremonies Greenberg. who sum- 
moned him back to the mike. 

The Mayor demonstrated, again. 
the aplomb bom of experience from 
participating in many a mixed-up 
ceremony. He returned to the 
stage, leaned toward the mike and 
declared: "I dedicate this great air- 
port structure to all of the people 
of Northern California." 

THE AIRPORT BACKSTAGE: 
Innumerable persons had been in- 
volved in the events leading up to 
the public preview. Among the 
leaders: 

Bud ( Henry, Jr. I Bostwick. affa- 
ble, knowledgeable manager of the 
potent San Mateo County Develop- 
ment Association, who had put to- 
gether the unique activity of the 
week — a day-long New Era Con- 
ference for business and industry- 
that brought hundreds of the 
West's top industrialists to Hilton 
Inn to hear all phases of the air- 
port's economic impact examined. 
(Among the interested auditors 
was Nils Eklund. President of the 
Oakland Chamber of Commerce 



and Chairman of the Oakland Air- 
port Save the Jets Committee.) 

Frank Olson of Barrett Trans- 
portation and George Piquette of 
Interstate Host President and 

Vice President respectively, of the 
Airport Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce — who produced an unusual 
"Junior Press Day" featuring some 
50 young journalists froni Penin- 
sula high schools. 

Ross Game. Editor of the Napa 
Register and Northern California 
Chairman of the Associated Press 
News Editors Conference, who 
brought a State-wide group of ed- 
itors to the airport for a long, 
drinking look at the South Ter- 
minal and who left with the re- 
quest: "Let us know when you 
open the North Terminal — we'll be 
back!" 

Mrs. John Menzies. the Airport 
Women's Committee Chairman, 
who organized the invitational New 
Era Reception and who drew scores 
of the most well known San Fran- 
cisco hostesses to assist her in 
making it a fabulous event. 

25 YEAR NOTE: May we take 
this occasion to congratulate a man 
who over 25 years of pushing a 
daily Ccept Saturday! column 
through the Chronicle, the Ex- 
aminer, and then the Chronicle, 
again, has never, never once lost 
his deep hatred for those obscenity 



obscenity obscenity pigeons who 
lou.se not only the grrass, alas, but 
also public places and, more im- 
portantly, people. Herb Caen, who 
long ago passed the 32nd degiee of 
columning and is well into the 
realm of legend. 

But even while tilting our .som- 
brero to the incomparable Caen, we 
should note a rival shadow of no 
insignificant proportions in the 
columning field: Rumor has it that 
the Examiner is about to bring 
back Bob Pattei-son. the "Freddie 
Francisco" who attracted readers 
by the thousands, who wrote like 
an angel, who unfortunately ran 
afoul of a number of accepted cus- 
toms during the pre-war days. 
Rumor also has it an old friend 
of ours, Rumor lives next door with 
his three wives and six happy chil- 
dren who are constantly throwing 
rocks through their glass house- 
that the Ex will re-introduce him 
by telling All, then letting him pick 
up from there, over the prostrate 
bodies of the innumerable would-be 
columnists who have come to 
doomsday tilting with Caen. 

If Rumor's right it should be a 
battle grand. 

Anyway — before the battle'.s 
joined — happy silver anniversary, 
Herbeil I 



SACRED HEART 
HIGH SCHOOL 

1075 ELLIS STREET 
San Francisco. California 



CARROLL BROS. 

MONUMENTS 

1730 MISSION STREET 
PL. 5-2818 
COLMA 

■•t»Mn HOLY CHOSS and 
CYPRESS LAWN CEMETERIES 



CONSTRUCTION 
AGGREGATES 
CORPORATION 

50) MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 5 

I>0. 2-1718 



SUNSHINE 
REST HOME 

719 - 36th Avenue 
SK. 1-7705 

24 Hr. Care for Ambulatory Guests 

M.n and Women— Elevator Service 



IRMA & JEAN 

HAIR STYLISTS 

E.perl Hair Slylincj — Tinti ■ Dyes 
Permanent Wavet 
For Appointment 

Call LO. 4-0575 

2143 TARAVAL STREET 

San Francisco, California 



McKale's Service Station 

Reaoan E. Howe t Ken Silveitri 

BRAKE SERVICE - TUNE UPS 

GENERAL REPAIRS 

EXPERT MECHANIC— PROMPT SERVICE 

6900 GEARY BOULEVARD 

SK. 2-0430 



PIER FORTY LUNCH 

SALLY and BABE 

Good Food ■ Beer - Wine 

PIER 40 EMBARCADERO 
SU. 1-9514 



Moler Barber College 

D. E. BROWN, M^r. 

Short Course 

Lon Tuition — Easy Terms 

lil FOURTH STREET SA. |.«7? 

Free Literature 



FREE DELIVERY 

ENGDAHL'S INC. 



PAINTS - UNFINISHED FURNITURE 



DAY & NITE CAFE 

Fine Foods 

24 HOUR SERVICE 

1611 ELLIS STREET 

WA. 1-9884 



AMPERE ELECTRIC 

Electrical Contractor 

22 58-B GEARY ST. 

WE. 1-0144 
l'.rr,oH Bradford 



MAR VISTA 
PHARMACY 

■LET US HELP SUPPLY 
YOUR FAMILY SEEDS' 

3035 Taraval St. 

overland 1-1330 

San Francisco 



1' 



CITY TOWING SERVICE 

MIKE & JIM'S GARAGE 

Complete Automotive Service 

3950 - 24th STREET 
VAIcncia 6-1886 

M. FUENTES. JR. 



Sutter Furniture Mfg. Co. 

CUSTOM FURNITURE 



275 CAPP STREET 

San Francisco 10 

MA. 1-5447 



FREDERICK MEISWINKEL 
Incorporated 

Contracting Plasterer 

JOrdan 7-4694 

2155 TURK STREET 

San Francisco 15 Californi.t 



TELEPHONE MARKET 

GROCERIES ■ PRODUCE -BEER 

WINE 

2895 PINE STREET 

JO. 7-9679 



GREEK • AMERICAN 
VETERAN CLUB 

161 EDDY STREET 



MABEL HINTON 
Guest House 

1090 Page St. HE. 1-9253 



For TuneUps 

ROY W. JOHNSON 



FAR EAST CAFE 



THE RECORD 



DOBBS 

(Continued from Page 12) 
th William L. Ferdon. 
But the law was not enough to 
;upy the driving mind and phys- 
1 energy of Harold Dobbs. With 
lartner, ho pioneered the drive-in 
itaurant business in San Fran- 
co in 1946. The enterprise grew 

a highly successful group of 
ve-ins, restaurants and recrea- 
nal centers in San Francisco. 
i throughout the Bay Area. 

:n 1951, Dobbs made his first bid 
public office membership on 
! Board of Supervisors. He was 
cted. re-elected in 19.'i5 and 
»in in 1959. 

ie is presently chairman of the 
pervisors' Finance Committee. 

1 group which takes out what- 
!r water there may be in the city 
Iget, for the benefit of the tax- 
irer. He has served as chairman 



or member of a variety of com- 
mittees and as President of the 
Board. 

At 44, he has earned the reputa- 
tion of a dynamo when it comes 
to analyzing the needs of the 
people of San Francisco and de- 
termining what the Board can do 
to make this a better city in which 
to live. 

Sandwiched in with liis other 
activities have been directorships 
in a variety of organizations in- 
cluding St. Elizabeth's Infant Shel- 
ter, the Jewish Home For The 
Aged, and the San Francisco Boys' 
Club. 

Dobbs, a devoted family man, 
campaigns with his wife, Annette, 
and a devoted task force of vol- 
unteers. 

The Supervisor and his wife 
have five children. They live at 
1601 Monterey Boulevard. 



Bell's Jewelers 

H'a/cA- Clock & Jewelry Repaii 

Watch Bands 

Longines — Bulova 

715 IRVING STREET 

MO 1-1080 

SAN FRANCISCO 



BOB'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

P.iris - .Auco Repairing - Lube 

Body Reconstruction 
360 - 20th St. San Francisc 

VA. 4-2722 

ROBERT BARILE 



Bentiey Engineers 

405 SANSOME ST. 

GA. 1-1042 

San Francisco, California 



ROYAL BAKING CO. 

4773 MISSION STREET 

JU 5-9655 

SAN FRANCISCO 



KOTZBECK GALLERIES 

Fine Prints - Expert Framing 

Oru;.nals in Water Colors 

and Oils 

031 Fi